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Come And Get It & Creepy Old Men


hepclassic
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I remember watching this film a while back ago, and while it has the first Oscar winning Best Supporting Actor performance, not to mention, Frances Farmer in the flesh, I'll admit I was creeped out by Edward Arnold's character, who *spoiler* does not get with Farmer and ends up lusting after her daughter. 

 

I understand it was the thirties and this was a period piece at that, and while it is a good movie, it has been forever since I saw it because Arnold's character was just so creepy. What do you think and remember? 

post-29241-0-01012800-1400169194_thumb.jpg

 

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I remember watching this film a while back ago, and while it has the first Oscar winning Best Supporting Actor performance, not to mention, Frances Farmer in the flesh, I'll admit I was creeped out by Edward Arnold's character, who *spoiler* does not get with Farmer and ends up lusting after her daughter. 

 

I understand it was the thirties and this was a period piece at that, and while it is a good movie, it has been forever since I saw it because Arnold's character was just so creepy. What do you think and remember? 

I thought it was a clever use of a dual role. TO EACH HIS OWN does it too.  John Lund plays the man that Olivia de Havilland has an affair with in the beginning, then later, he plays her son.  So it's sort of the reverse of COME AND GET IT.

 

It certainly saves on having to hire two different actors.

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I thought it was a clever use of a dual role. TO EACH HIS OWN does it too.  John Lund plays the man that Olivia de Havilland has an affair with in the beginning, then later, he plays her son.  So it's sort of the reverse of COME AND GET IT.

 

It certainly saves on having to hire two different actors.

Yes, it does, but To Each His Own didn't have the stalkery, almost pedophiliac vibe to it like Come and Get It had. 

 

I am glad the Joel McCrea character got with the reincarnated Frances Farmer character in the end, but it still felt weird, like going-to-church-after-being-molested-by-the-priest weird. 

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Yes, it does, but To Each His Own didn't have the stalkery, almost pedophiliac vibe to it like Come and Get It had. 

 

I am glad the Joel McCrea character got with the reincarnated Frances Farmer character in the end, but it still felt weird, like going-to-church-after-being-molested-by-the-priest weird. 

Yes, I think that by adding the word 'creepy' in your subject header, you are going in a direction about the unsavory aspects of such storytelling. But I am not looking at it that way. I see it as economical casting, and also as clever writing. The ick factor doesn't have to be there, if you don't let it. And honestly, I doubt audiences at the time were creeped out by it.

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Yes, I think that by adding the word 'creepy' in your subject header, you are going in a direction about the unsavory aspects of such storytelling. But I am not looking at it that way. I see it as economical casting, and also as clever writing. The ick factor doesn't have to be there, if you don't let it. And honestly, I doubt audiences at the time were creeped out by it.

Of course they weren't freaked out at the time by it, but ask any woman today when an older guy hits on her in a similar fashion and how she chooses to respond to it in a way that announces the ick, I don't think victim blaming is appropriate in this department. I suppose if it were like in this film the genders were reversed and Alison Skipworth lusted after Joel McCrea, there would be a different take on the matter. 

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I watched this film again a few months ago and really enjoyed it.  I didn't find Edward Arnold's character creepy, but rather delusional and pathetic, thinking that this beautiful young woman could be in love with him.

I thought so too, but it took that character a mere 45-50 minutes for himself to realize how delusional and pathetic he was being. 

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The idea of Frances Farmer in a love triangle with Edward Arnold and Walter Brennan, as in the first half of the movie, seems distasteful. I don't think this seemed as creepy to 30s audiences as it does now to us.

 

I believe the notion of a man falling in love with the grown daughter of the woman he loved could be powerful, if you think of a character like James Stewart's Scotty Ferguson in Vertigo, but the subject would require careful handling.

 

Edward Arnold as a romantic lead just seems wrong to some of us, but he and Frances Farmer were also paired in The Toast of New York, where she ends up with Cary Grant.

 

 

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The idea of Frances Farmer in a love triangle with Edward Arnold and Walter Brennan, as in the first half of the movie, seems distasteful. I don't think this seemed as creepy to 30s audiences as it does now to us.

 

I believe the notion of a man falling in love with the grown daughter of the woman he loved could be powerful, if you think of a character like James Stewart's Scotty Ferguson in Vertigo, but the subject would require careful handling.

 

Edward Arnold as a romantic lead just seems wrong to some of us, but he and Frances Farmer were also paired in The Toast of New York, where she ends up with Cary Grant.

In modern context, Scotty Ferguson could easily be in real life the obsessive kind of creep in the way he follows a woman around and gets her to degrade herself with an image of his past lover (spoiler not included) for his own voyeuristic fantasy. 

 

Edward Arnold's character is also fixated on the past, but creeps a different creep. 

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The idea of Frances Farmer in a love triangle with Edward Arnold and Walter Brennan, as in the first half of the movie, seems distasteful. I don't think this seemed as creepy to 30s audiences as it does now to us.

 

I believe the notion of a man falling in love with the grown daughter of the woman he loved could be powerful, if you think of a character like James Stewart's Scotty Ferguson in Vertigo, but the subject would require careful handling.

 

Edward Arnold as a romantic lead just seems wrong to some of us, but he and Frances Farmer were also paired in The Toast of New York, where she ends up with Cary Grant.

 

Okay, I have to ask here...

 

Could it more the case that with Edward Arnold never being "the most handsome guy in the world" that THIS might have some major bearing on this issue?

 

Ya see, and speaking of Cary Grant, I have to wonder if HE had played a character similar to this in his later years and where HE attempted to woo the daughter of the women he was once in love with, IF perhaps THIS would still elicit the same amount of "ecks"?

 

'Cause as I recall, it sure as heck was "acceptable" for Cary to woo a heck of a lot of women in films later in his career and who were half HIS age at the time.

 

(...food for thought, perhaps?)

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Okay, I have to ask here...

 

Could it more the case that with Edward Arnold never being "the most handsome guy in the world" that THIS might have some major bearing on this issue?

 

Ya see, and speaking of Cary Grant, I have to wonder if HE had played a character similar to this in his later years and where HE attempted to woo the daughter of the women he was once in love with, IF perhaps THIS would still elicit the same amount of "ecks"?

 

'Cause as I recall, it sure as heck was "acceptable" for Cary to woo a heck of a lot of women in films later in his career and who were half HIS age at the time.

 

(...food for thought, perhaps?)

Good point, Dargo. 

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Good point, Dargo. 

 

Thanks, hep! 

 

Yep, I would guess that almost any woman would probably "accept" being hit on by THIS guy even in his "later years"...

 

c13c06a63609c3255199e9ad2c95b71e.jpg

 

..over THIS guy...

 

Edward%20Arnold%20(1890%20-%201956).jpg

 

...and even in the latter's younger days!!!

 

(...what say you ladies???...I'm right, ain't I?!...in OTHER words, FACE it...YOU can sometimes be as "shallow" as us GUYS are!!!)  :P 

 

LOL

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I can only speak for myself here, but just because a couple of us are attention-seeking, shallow jezebels doesn't mean we all are. 

 

LOL

 

(...and now it's MY turn to say, "good point", hep!) ;)

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Happens all the time. Men never stop being affected by the beauty of young women.

Yes, but there is a distinct difference between love and lust, not to mention romance and obsession. The weirder thing is that women are always blamed for the man's choice of response. 

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Thanks, hep! 

 

Yep, I would guess that almost any woman would probably "accept" being hit on by THIS guy even in his "later years"...

 

c13c06a63609c3255199e9ad2c95b71e.jpg

 

..over THIS guy...

 

Edward%20Arnold%20(1890%20-%201956).jpg

 

...and even in the latter's younger days!!!

 

(...what say you ladies???...I'm right, ain't I?!...in OTHER words, FACE it...YOU can sometimes be as "shallow" as us GUYS are!!!)  :P 

 

LOL

You know, at least in the photos, I have more of a thing for Mr. Arnold.  But then Oscar Levant is my heart throb, so what do I know? :wub:

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You know, at least in the photos, I have more of a thing for Mr. Arnold.  But then Oscar Levant is my heart throb, so what do I know? :wub:

 

Eeh! I knew Oscar before he was a chain-smoking raconteur! ;)

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