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Means he was a self professed bleeding heart liberal. I am not. Tore into Reagan as being an idiot and Heston too in his bio.

 

Still, I liked him immensely.

 

One real fine fellow.

I'm liking him more all the time. We need someone to balance that knuckle-dragger John Wayne. I'm not a liberal, but coming here making this political is BS. What's wrong?! Tired of conversing with fellow mindless dittoheads on The Drudge Report blogs?! This place is for MOVIES... There HAS to be an oasis from that SOMEWHERE...

 

OK... I see this was a response to someone else's digging so forgive me for jumping in the deep so quickly but the whole point was let him rest in PEACE. That means, I think he's pretty apolitical now.

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I'm liking him more all the time. We need someone to balance that knuckle-dragger John Wayne. I'm not a liberal, but coming here making this political is BS. What's wrong?! Tired if conversing with fellow mindless dittoheads on The Drudge Report blogs?! This place is for MOVIES... There HAS to be an oasis from that SOMEWHERE...

 

OK... I see this was a response to someone else's digging so forgive me for jumping in the deep so quickly but the whole point was let him rest in PEACE. That means, I think he's pretty apolitical now.

 

I think James Garners personal views are best reflected in this book. 

 

garner-files-cover.jpg

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Great bio and some really interesting facts that I had not known.

 

Abusive step mom

 

Lifelong weed consumer

 

The road rage beating.

Sounds like my life... LOL. Apparently, these things made him more HUMAN (you know, with a SOUL). Can you put away the manure spreader now, John Boy?!

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And let us not forget(that is if no one has mentioned this yet) that Garner was one of the first "television stars" to successfully make a career on the big screen, and primarily of special note because it was something few other working actors were able to do during the '50s and '60s.

 

(...RIP Jim)

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Sounds like my life... LOL. Apparently, these things made him more HUMAN (you know, with a SOUL). Can you put away the manure spreader now, John Boy?!

James Garner was a real person and not just a fictional character on a tv or movie screen. I am mourning his loss not the loss of Jim Rockford per se.

 

He is being discussed today and being remembered  for his great achievements for decades on screen but is also being remembered fondly as a real person.

 Do yourself a favor and read his bio...perhaps you'll appreciate him more as a person rather than an image.

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And let us not forget(that is if no one has mentioned this yet) that Garner was one of the first "television stars" to successfully make a career on the big screen, and primarily of special note because it was something few other working actors were able to do during the '50s and '60s.

 

(...RIP Jim)

Some do not recall that Garner actually appeared in SAYONARA before he started doing "Maverick".

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Some do not recall that Garner actually appeared in SAYONARA before he started doing "Maverick".

 

True finance, however it really wasn't until and after "Maverick" that Jim become more than just pretty much a bit player on the big screen.

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Some do not recall that Garner actually appeared in SAYONARA before he started doing "Maverick".

He was a supporting character in "Sayonara." He had more of a lead role in "The Children's Hour." His first film was in 1956. 

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Maverick started as a fairly conventional western series. Somewhere during the first season, though, it was discovered that James Garner could play comedy. He had a marvelous facility, not only with an intelligent delivery of clever dialogue, but with a subtle facial reaction, to bring a humorous edge to a scene.

 

Interestingly, though, after brother Bart (played by Jack Kelly) entered the serries, whenever the script writers put together a script, rather than call one character Brett (Garner) or Bart, their scripts simply said Maverick One and Maverick Two for the characters. Garner always had first pick as to which script he would play, one with Maverick One or Two, based, of course, on what he thought would work best for him.

 

I've also read that on the Maverick set it was Kelly that had the stronger sense of humour of the two actors, ironic since he couldn't pull it off in a scene with a tenth of the aplomb of Garner.

 

maverick-jc-jg.jpg

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When James left the series, interestingly the shows producers brought in a young  Roger Moore to fill in.

That was in the fourth season. There was still one more Garner episode that hadn't been shown yet (called The Maverick Line) in which Brett and Bart become owners of a stagecoach line. It was the last show of the series that Garner filmed and, IMHO, one of the best, delightfully tongue-in-cheek.

 

Viewers at the time must have been confused, though. Everyone knew that Garner had left the series, so they were tuning in weekly to see episodes with Kelly and Moore. Suddenly, one week on popped The Maverick Line with good ol' James Garner teamed with Kelly for the last time. After that it was back to Roger Moore and Jack Kelly once again.

 

The best of the Maverick series was over once Garner left it for the movie horizon.

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Garner also successfully sued Warner Brothers when he was suspended without pay during a writer's strike, and was let out of his MAVERICK contract. He never held a grudge against Warner Brothers afterwards, but he did against Universal. Even after agreeing to reprise his Rockford character in a series of TV movies beginning in 1996, he refused to film any of them at the studio.

He held a grudge against Jack Warner. Garner would work at any studio, but he openly admitted that he detested Jack Warner.

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Some do not recall that Garner actually appeared in SAYONARA before he started doing "Maverick".

 

But it was not released until Maverick had been on the air several months.

 

Garner filmed the Maverick pilot, then surprisingly was given the lead in Darby's Rangers when Heston dropped out, after which Maverick was picked up by ABC for the fall schedule.

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James Garner is one of my top 3 favorite actors, whether TV or movies. His character portrayals looked effortless, whatever the role. Some of his movies are not on my favorites list but I always have to watch them because James Garner was in them.TCM just played "36 Hours" last week and I had to drop everything to watch it. By and far my favorite Garner character was Jim Rockford. I grew up watching the Rockford Files and he had some of the best car chase scenes on TV, as good as many films, and he did his own stunt work. He had a race car business in the late 60's where he partnered with AMC to convert some AMC SCRamblers into racers that actually did quite well. He drove the Indy 500 pace car about 4 times. Garner just seemed like a guy you could connect with in his many roles, and always reported as just a genuine guy off screen. In that perennial dinner game of "if I could invite any 5 people to dinner", he is always on my list as one of the invitees. My best to his family. I hope TCM will have a days retrospective of his work.  

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Maverick started as a fairly conventional western series. Somewhere during the first season, though, it was discovered that James Garner could play comedy. He had a marvelous facility, not only with an intelligent delivery of clever dialogue, but with a subtle facial reaction, to bring a humorous edge to a scene.

 

Interestingly, though, after brother Bart (played by Jack Kelly) entered the serries, whenever the script writers put together a script, rather than call one character Brett (Garner) or Bart, their scripts simply said Maverick One and Maverick Two for the characters. Garner always had first pick as to which script he would play, one with Maverick One or Two, based, of course, on what he thought would work best for him.

 

Actually as an experiment one script (I forget which one) was written specifically for Jack Kelly.

 

I've also read that on the Maverick set it was Kelly that had the stronger sense of humour of the two actors, ironic since he couldn't pull it off in a scene with a tenth of the aplomb of Garner.

 

Offstage Dean Martin was the funny one, always joking around, in contrast to grimly serious Jerry Lewis.

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My family and I are watching Grand Prix right now in honor of Mr. Garner. 

 

So far, I'm digging Frankenheimer's style with the split screen showing the race on the left and right sides of the screen and a storyline going on in the middle section. 

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