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sorry to hear this, always felt him a real gentleman.

 

One of my favorite Garner roles:

 

the-americanization-of-emily-charlie-in-

 

 

 

 

"We crass Americans didn't introduce war into your little island. This war, Ms. Barham to which we Americans are so insensitive, is the result of 2,000 years of European greed, barbarism, superstition, and stupidity. Don't blame it on our Coca-cola bottles. Europe was a going brothel long before we came to town."

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"We crass Americans didn't introduce war into your little island. This war, Ms. Barham to which we Americans are so insensitive, is the result of 2,000 years of European greed, barbarism, superstition, and stupidity. Don't blame it on our Coca-cola bottles. Europe was a going brothel long before we came to town."

Yeah, the smugness of Europeans is nauseating sometimes. I loved this when he said it. They owe a lot to us and few remember our sacrifices on their soil.

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I just heard about this.  He’d been in declining health for a while so this was not unexpected but dreaded nonetheless.  Another actor whose career I watched being born and was there at the end.  I almost can't imagine his not being around.  

 

The first time I saw him was on the last page of the 1957 Fall Preview edition of TV-Radio Mirror.  His photo took up the whole page.  He was in a dark jacket with a light turtleneck and smiling from ear to ear.  He had me right then.  The caption said he was starring on a new series, Maverick, Sunday nights on ABC which crushed me because we didn’t have anything but CBS in Jacksonville then.  When the show became such a hit they made room for the summer reruns and found space on the fall schedule for seasons 2-3   (Yes, the networks were civilized enough back then to do things like this.)   When it starting running on Encore Westerns I finally got to see the early ones I’d missed and later ones from the time I was I was in other places living elsewhere.  Mom never liked the show-she thought it was immoral-but we kids sure did.)   I was delighted when he made it in films and had more success in TV.  He deserved the Emmys he won and that Oscar nomination.

 

From his book I found he was very critical of himself and his films and often rated his work or movies much lower than I did.  He was honest about himself and definitely not swell-headed.  Having a lasting family life for over 50 years was the best revenge for the awful childhood he experienced.  Thank you, Sir, for sharing yourself with us.  The world is a little bit emptier today.

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I had the pleasure of working with James Garner in 1969 on a Barbara Eden special at ABC in Hollywood. During the 2 or 3 days shoot, I found him to be a friendly, relaxed professional. Joking with the crew, he never played the "star" .I always considered him a pleasure to watch on the small or big screen.He had a "quality" about him the made you want to root for his character. I really can't think of a film he did that I didn't like him, maybe not the film, but he always came across as someone you cared about..a fine actor..R.I.P.

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I had the pleasure of working with James Garner in 1969 on a Barbara Eden special at ABC in Hollywood. During the 2 or 3 days shoot, I found him to be a friendly, relaxed professional. Joking with the crew, he never played the "star" .I always considered him a pleasure to watch on the small or big screen.He had a "quality" about him the made you want to root for his character. I really can't think of a film he did that I didn't like him, maybe not the film, but he always came across as someone you cared about..a fine actor..R.I.P.

Thanks for sharing that, Fred. I think it's safe to say that James Garner always gave his fans the impression that he was very much a good guy, a down to earth professional who never developed a swelled head about himself. He said that when it came to his work it was the pleasure of the "doing" that was most important to him, far more than the reception that the show or film would later receive (though, obviously, from a practical viewpoint, that is important, too - it just wasn't as much of a priority for him).

 

Garner is one of the few actors that I would have liked to have met. I doubt that I would have been disappointed.

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I just heard the news. He had to be one of the most consistent and versatile actors that I'd ever seen; I don't think that he ever gave a bad performance, no matter what he starred in (and he played in pretty much every genre). I loved his sense of humor and no-nonsense approach to his craft, and he never seemed to let the appeal of stardom go to his head. I don't recall him getting into any feuds or spats with fellow actors either. To say the he'll be missed is an understatement.

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Just finished watching Grand Prix.  It was an excellent film; albeit I think Frankenheimer went a little nuts with the split screens.  I know I was praising it in the beginning and in most of the film, the split screens were effective; however, some of them seemed superfluous.  I also tired of the marching band music; but that didn't really detract from my enjoyment of the film.

 

I liked Garner's character and Yves Montand's character the best.  Eva Marie Saint was good; although I think I liked her in some of her other films better-- like North By Northwest. The car racing scenes were exciting as were the crashes.  I hate watching car racing on TV; but fortunately, the film kept the race scenes relatively short-- even though there were a lot of them.  I'm glad they broke up the monotony of watching cars drive around the same track a million times with different scenes. 

 

Now, continuing our Garner tribute, we're watching Move Over Darling which is currently on the Netflix Instant Queue.

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The Dallas Mavericks.

 

Yes! That is correct! I didn't believe it the first time I heard about it. But Garner talked about it once in a television interview. Although he was no longer a team owner when the Mavs won the 2011 NBA title over the Miami Heat, he must have been proud.

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Yes! That is correct! I didn't believe it the first time I heard about it. But Garner talked about it once in a television interview. Although he was no longer a team owner when the Mavs won the 2011 NBA title over the Miami Heat, he must have been proud.

I would think he would have been proud, too :).

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I had the pleasure of working with James Garner in 1969 on a Barbara Eden special at ABC in Hollywood. During the 2 or 3 days shoot, I found him to be a friendly, relaxed professional. Joking with the crew, he never played the "star" .I always considered him a pleasure to watch on the small or big screen.He had a "quality" about him the made you want to root for his character. I really can't think of a film he did that I didn't like him, maybe not the film, but he always came across as someone you cared about..a fine actor..R.I.P.

fredb- that's the exact impression that I was left with after reading James Garner's autobiography. Some of his fellow actors, crew members,friends, etc commented about him in the book, and they all basically had the same glowing feelings that you experienced. Thanks for sharing with us your memories of working with James Garner

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08pola.533.jpg

 

Watching these two together in their 30 second Polaroid commercials was more fun in the late '70s-early '80s than ninety percent of the shows that were on television at the time.

 

Mariette Hartley would also appear in at least one Rockford Files episode, if memory serves me correctly, but she once lamented that an opportunity to work in a film with Garner never did materialize for her.

 

For those who care, a number of their Polaroid bits are available for viewing on You Tube.

 

 

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Just finished watching Grand Prix.  It was an excellent film; albeit I think Frankenheimer went a little nuts with the split screens.  I know I was praising it in the beginning and in most of the film, the split screens were effective; however, some of them seemed superfluous.  I also tired of the marching band music; but that didn't really detract from my enjoyment of the film.

 

I liked Garner's character and Yves Montand's character the best.  Eva Marie Saint was good; although I think I liked her in some of her other films better-- like North By Northwest. The car racing scenes were exciting as were the crashes.  I hate watching car racing on TV; but fortunately, the film kept the race scenes relatively short-- even though there were a lot of them.  I'm glad they broke up the monotony of watching cars drive around the same track a million times with different scenes. 

 

Now, continuing our Garner tribute, we're watching Move Over Darling which is currently on the Netflix Instant Queue.

I'm not usually one to quote myself... but I wanted to follow up on my opinion of Move Over Darling

 

A few minutes into this film... I began thinking: "Hmm.. I've seen this before..." sure enough, after a quick visit to imdb, I realized that this film was a remake of My Favorite Wife.  Also, on imdb, I learned that this film was the final version of Something's Gotta Give, which originally was going to star Marilyn Monroe and Dean Martin.  Monroe was fired and Martin refused to make the film without her.  The film was shelved until the next year when it was finally made with Doris Day and James Garner.

 

I haven't seen Cary Grant and Irene Dunne's My Favorite Wife for quite some time, so I can't comment on that one.  However, what I can say is that I enjoyed this film much more than I did Day and Garner's other effort The Thrill of It All.  Garner was smokin' hot back in the day too.  I definitely couldn't overlook that.  I really enjoyed the storyline and the supporting actors.  Who doesn't love Don Knotts?  and Gomez from "The Addams Family" was good in the small role he had.  Edgar "Uncle Joe" Buchanan was hilarious.  He's a great character actor and I didn't realize what a prolific career he had prior to Petticoat Junction.  I can't say that I enjoyed Polly Bergen too much.  Her voice bothered me.  It just wasn't a sexy sounding voice.  I know that's probably weird-- but I couldn't see what Garner saw in her.  Thelma Ritter was also a fun surprise.  The more she pops up in various films I'm watching, the more I'm really enjoying her work.  I think she has a SUTS day coming up, I'll have to check out more of her films.  It was interesting seeing her in a grandmother role, I'm used to seeing her as a wise cracking maid or friend or something. 

 

Anyway, Day and Garner made a great team, I wish that they would have made more films together.  I'd almost go as far to say that they made a better team than Day and Rock Hudson.  Even though I enjoy those films as well. 

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08pola.533.jpg

 

Watching these two together in their 30 second Polaroid commercials was more fun in the late '70s-early '80s than ninety percent of the shows that were on television at the time.

 

Mariette Hartley would also appear in at least one Rockford Files episode, if memory serves me correctly, but she once lamented that an opportunity to work in a film with Garner never did materialize for her.

 

For those who care, a number of their Polaroid bits are available for viewing on You Tube.

Hartley and Garner were so convincing as husband and wife that many though they were really married, People would ask Garner how his wife was, meaning Hartley. The comm.'s were so popular that people would walk into a store and ask ask for James Garner's camera.

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When Garner played Jim Rockford, arguably the role for which he is best remembered today, that same character had, essentially, already been born 17 years before when he first played Brett Maverick.

 

Only this version, now a private eye, was set in modern times and had been around the block a few more times. He was more seasoned but still the same sly guy trying his best to avoid a fight, if he could, trying a con, whatever, with the bad guys. And always there was the charm and that low key sense of humour, a Garner trademark. He was the reluctant hero, par excellence. But despite his protests that he was no hero, the audience always knew him to be a person of honour and one who would, ultimately, do the right thing.

 

Rockford was also, in contrast to all private eyes that preceded him, a guy who lived in a trailer on the beach, and had a father who wanted him to get a "real career" going. He also had a weasel of a friend called Angel, a guy who would fleece him if he could but a guy that Rockford somehow could not turn his back on (as much as he may have deserved it).

 

James Garner was perfect in that role. Despite the fact that he was, to put it mildly, movie star handsome, Garner had that everyman quality about him with whom audiences could identify. He was one of us.

 

Hearing today of his death has genuinely saddened me, and in that I know I am not alone. Perhaps that is one of the greatest tributes there can be for an actor like him, a reflection of his sheer likeability. Few of us knew James Garner yet we somehow feel like we did.

 

So long, Jimbo. You won't be forgotten. You gave us a hell of a great ride.

 

imagesCABXI5A2_zps22158499.jpg

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Thanks, Dargo.

 

Speaking for myself, if there was one thing, above all else, that I loved the most about Garner it was the humour that he brought to a scene, even one of physical violence.

 

I don't think it was a case of audiences wanting to see Rockford take a beating from some hoods so much as it was the sheer pleasure of watching James Garner try to joke and charm his way out of that beating first.

 

"Please don't hit me," he'd say to the goon, or something to that effect, "I just finished paying my dental bill" followed by - POW - right in the kisser. Or, "Does your mother know what you do for a living?" - followed by a fast knee to the gut.

 

 

I think that Frazier Moore, of The Associated Press, nailed a description of the actor's subtle comedy technique when he wrote this about one of Garner's facial gestures yesterday:

 

Few actors could register disbelief, exasperation or annoyance with more comic subtlety. James Garner had a way of widening his eyes while the corner of his mouth sagged ever so slightly. Maybe he would swallow once to further make his point.

 

This portrait of fleeting disquiet could be understood, and identified with, by every member of the audience."

 

 

The man was a master.

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He also had a one season series in 81-82, Brett Maverick.  He was a gambler who won a saloon and also owned a ranch.  Stuart Margolin played an "indian."  Very entertaining shows.  Used to show up on Encore Westerns, but haven't seen them in a while.

Legalese is another very good Garner movie.  Available on DVD and was a TV movie (I think).  Ironically it is rated R, but really wasn't.  Wouldn't get a PG rating now.

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Y'know, this just s u c k s!  Bad enough I had another TIA incident and spent four more days in the hospital( got out yesterday afternoon). but also, when I first got to my room and activated the TV, I watched some news( on every station it seemed) about the plane tragedy, but for about 20 seconds or so in the middle of one of the "reports", NBC was kind enough to bum me out with the news of JOHNNY WINTER'S death.  Winter was just about my favorite blues singer and guitarist.  Made the hospital stay that much more depressing.

 

And now, JAMES GARNER.  Because as a kid I hardly missed an episode of MAVERICK, I grew to be a huge Garner fan.  Loved him in almost everything he did.  My wife, who I'm not sure knows he died yet, will be bummed.  She thought he was sooooo handsome, and also was a big fan. 

 

So, with the strokes and Johnny and Jim's deaths it's safe for me to say......Worst summer EVER!!!

 

Sepiatone

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