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If YOU were guest programmer, your selections would be:


GenRipper66
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Modern Times - my fav Chaplin film

M - Fritz Lang's indictment

Dodsworth - classic tale of people wanting different things in life

Paths of Glory - Kubrick's homage to French military thinking

 

I think too many people have seen Dr. Strangelove and my goal would be to introduce movies they might not have seen even though many of these get a lot of TCM airplay. Favorite movie list would be different.

 

Oops... One too many... Bye homage to Orson.

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Funny Girl- the first classic film I saw 

Klute-my first Jane Fonda film in which I actually paid attention to her amazing talent. 

The Philadelphia Story- essential Katharine Hepburn

Carmen Jones- Dorothy Dandridge essential

Shanghai Express- Dietrich and Anna May Wong, need I say more?

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Paths of Glory - Kubrick's homage to French military thinking

 

 

LOL

 

Reminds me of what the Mankster once said after a showing of this film on TCM a couple years ago now. It went somethin' like this:

 

"PATHS OF GLORY was banned for many years in France because the French Government viewed its message as an affront to the French Military....insert your own French Military joke here!"

 

 

(...man, I STILL crack-up every time I think of that...and coincidentally, THAT'S when I started warmin' up to the guy!) LOL

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LOL

 

Reminds me of what the Mankster once said after a showing of this film on TCM a couple years ago now. It went somethin' like this:

 

"PATHS OF GLORY was banned for many years in France because the French Government viewed its message as an affront to the French Military....insert your own French Military joke here!"

 

 

(...man, I STILL crack-up every time I think of that...and coincidentally, THAT'S when I started warmin' up to the guy!) LOL

Yeah, not high on any Frenchie recommended viewing list. But, this could be many country's militaries. The good ol' USA has a very black mark on it for its conduct at the end of WWI. After the armistice was declared to go into effect at the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month, our generals sent countless of our soldiers to their deaths in one last grasp for territory. It was sickening and pathetic. Can you imagine the Germans knowing the end was near, having to machine gun down all these young boys who thought they'd survived the war?! It was a huge scandal because all these families were getting death notices of their boys as the war was ending. If not for the fact that the country was trying to heal itself, these generals (including Pershing) would have been tried for war crimes. It reminds me of that Clemenceau quote 'war is too important to be left to the generals...' I disagree...LOL. Ok... Getting lost in Dr. Strangelove...

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Random Harvest (1942)

Penelope (1966)

Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967)

Sunset Boulevard (1950)

 

It is a good thing that there is a limit of four films, otherwise I would go on for days.

Sunset Boulevard will always be dear to me because introducing the main character floating in the pool was awesome. Kind of like the intro to 'Lolita'.

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Wow! This is tough, but here goes:

 

1. "The Victors" (1963) -- Carl Foreman's harsh and gritty tale about American soldiers in World War II features an international all-star cast, including the late Eli Wallach, George Peppard, Melina Mercouri, George Hamilton, Romy Schneider, Vince Edwards, Elke Sommer, Peter Fonda, Jeanne Moreau, Albert Finney and Senta Berger.

 

2. "That Man from Rio" (1964) -- French director Philippe de Broca's riotous comedy is a spoof of the James Bond films and stars Jean-Paul Belmondo as a Parisian who becomes involved in international intrigue. Françoise Dorléac, the sister of Catherine Deneuve, plays the fiancée who becomes an unwilling participant. 

 

3. "L'Avventura" (1960) -- Michelangelo Antonioni's extremely frustrating story of a casual outing on a boat in the Mediterranean, and the tragedy that results during the trip. The film stars Monica Vitti, Gabriele Ferzetti and Lea Massari. 

 

4. "Repeat Performance" (1947) -- I've been hoping that TCM would do movies about New Year's Eve on December 31st, including "The Poseidon Adventure" and this film, which stars Louis Hayward, Joan Leslie, Virginia Field, Tom Conway and Richard Basehart. Leslie plays a stage actress who kills her husband (Hayward) on New Year's Eve, but somehow gets a chance to relive the previous 364 days.

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4. "Repeat Performance" (1947) -- I've been hoping that TCM would do movies about New Year's Eve on December 31st, including "The Poseidon Adventure" and this film, which stars Louis Hayward, Joan Leslie, Virginia Field, Tom Conway and Richard Basehart. Leslie plays a stage actress who kills her husband (Hayward) on New Year's Eve, but somehow gets a chance to relive the previous 364 days.

 

WAIT! Are we talkin' sweet little Joan "H-A-Double R-I, G-A-N spells Harrigan" Leslie here???

 

Oooh, I GOTTA see this one!

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WAIT! Are we talkin' sweet little Joan "H-A-Double R-I, G-A-N spells Harrigan" Leslie here???

 

Oooh, I GOTTA see this one!

 

Yep! And she was legal in all 48 states and various U.S. territories when she made the movie. She celebrated her 22nd birthday four months before it was released.

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I'd pick four childhood favorites that are rarely seen:

 

1.  Adventures in Silverado (1948). Fun western, with odd casting of Edgar Barrier playing Robert Louis Stevenson!

2.  Gog (1954). Decent spy sci-fi thriller, enhanced by Herbert Marshall strapping on a flame thrower to kick a robot's a**

3.  Strangler of the Swamp (1946). Extremely creepy thriller with future director Blake Edwards playing the romantic lead

4.  Target Earth (1954). Sure, the alien robot wears a large codpiece, but you get to see Richard Reeves and Virginia Grey make out

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I'd pick four childhood favorites that are rarely seen:

 

3.  Strangler of the Swamp (1946). Extremely creepy thriller with future director Blake Edwards playing the romantic lead

 make out

 

I know. I've never seen it, but I am very much intrigued by it and would love to. It was in the top ten forties faves of the guy who wrote The Psychotronic Film Guide. Blake Edwards was pretty hot when he was young.

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My picks:

 

Battleground--grim, but realistic WW2 tale

Niagara--Monroe sizzles, Cotten fizzles (into a jealous rage)

Summertree--first leading role for Michael Douglas

Grand Prix--Eva Marie Saint with one of the great screen melt-downs as Yves Montand is loaded into the ambulance

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Sticking to movies that I know that TCM has already shown, but are relatively unknown to the general audience.  Sorry, but since they're all subtitled, they're not too well suited for multitasking. :)

 

Traffic in Souls (1913)  A powerful early melodrama about a girl forced into prostitution

 

The Penalty (1921) Lon Chaney as a cruel and legless cripple, out to avenge his maiming at the hands of a childhood doctor.

 

Children of Paradise (1945) Words can't do it justice.  One of the great international films of the postwar era.

 

Germany: Year Zero (1948) A brutally honest cinematic depiction of the German homefront in the aftermath of V-E day.

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Kind Hearts & Coronets -- my favorite film

 

Head (yes, with the Monkees) -- it's one of the most innovative films ever made in Hollywood (I really believe that)

 

So This Is New York -- the only film vehicle of cantankerous radio comedian Henry Morgan, adapted from a Ring Lardner novel. I saw this once 25+ years ago but remember it as quite amusing and innovative, with sarcastic narration and freeze-frame gags.

 

Fury At Showdown -- a B minus western programmer shot in five days, but brilliantly photographed by Joseph LaShelle (Laura) with extensive use of deep focus and low angles.

 

The Scoundrel -- With Noel Coward and Alexander Woolcott, as close as we ever got to a film of The Algonquin Round Table.

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If I were guest programmer:

 

1) Picnic- One of the great 1950s melodramas, a great score and perhaps one of the sexiest dance scenes ever between William Holden and Kim Novak.

 

2) Stage Door- Featuring many of my favorites: Katharine Hepburn, Lucille Ball and Ann Miller.  This film has great dialogue and I love the cattiness between Hepburn and Ginger Rogers.

 

3) Libeled Lady- One of the funniest screwball comedies ever, featuring a fantastic cast: Jean Harlow, Myrna Loy, William Powell and Spencer Tracy.  One of the funniest parts of the film is Powell trying to fish. 

 

4) Dark Passage- My favorite of the Bogart/Bacall collaborations.  I love the first-person perspective used to tell the first half of the story.  Sometimes the plot seems a little hodgepodge, but the interesting narrative mode, a unique storyline and the great 1940s San Francisco scenery more than make up for it.  Agnes Moorehead is excellent in her supporting role.

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I'd pick four childhood favorites that are rarely seen:

 

1.  Adventures in Silverado (1948). Fun western, with odd casting of Edgar Barrier playing Robert Louis Stevenson!

2.  Gog (1954). Decent spy sci-fi thriller, enhanced by Herbert Marshall strapping on a flame thrower to kick a robot's a**

3.  Strangler of the Swamp (1946). Extremely creepy thriller with future director Blake Edwards playing the romantic lead

4.  Target Earth (1954). Sure, the alien robot wears a large codpiece, but you get to see Richard Reeves and Virginia Grey make out

Must see the last one to see the codpiece!! LOL

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Sticking to movies that I know that TCM has already shown, but are relatively unknown to the general audience.  Sorry, but since they're all subtitled, they're not too well suited for multitasking. :)

 

Traffic in Souls (1913)  A powerful early melodrama about a girl forced into prostitution

 

The Penalty (1921) Lon Chaney as a cruel and legless cripple, out to avenge his maiming at the hands of a childhood doctor.

 

Children of Paradise (1945) Words can't do it justice.  One of the great international films of the postwar era.

 

Germany: Year Zero (1948) A brutally honest cinematic depiction of the German homefront in the aftermath of V-E day.

Ooh, ooh... I would DVRing this whole night...

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Celine and Julie Go Boating (Celine et Julie Vont en Bateau)  (1974) -- What can I say, except that this movie is sublime.

 

The Day of the Locust (1975) -- Brilliant depiction of the brutality and dashed dreams of old Hollywood. Donald Sutherland's finest performance.

 

The Light that Failed (1939) -- One of the most romantic movies ever made, in the truest sense of the word. Ronald Colman at his best. 

 

Peter Ibbetson (1935) -- Hollywood's unsung surrealist masterpiece, with Gary Cooper and Ann Harding.

 

 

 

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The Collector (1965) creepy plot with Samantha Eggar

 

Wait Until Dark (1967)  excellent thriller

 

The Major and the Minor (1942)

 

Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)  Teddy Roosevelt would have liked this one!

 

To Be or Not to Be (1942)

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In reality, I'd probably pick films I've never seen before, but I'll resist that urge here. These four films have all shown on TCM recently, which is when I first saw them (as I've only recently been watching TCM), and they all made a big impression on me.

 

Cairo Station (1958), directed by and starring Youssef Chahine. This is a well-told and creepy story, openly inspired by Lon Chaney's tragic romances. Mr. Chahine is excellent as the gnomish cripple.

 

The Ladykillers (1955), one of my favorite comedies. Following my previous choice, there are similar themes of train stations, suspicious luggage and inept murder attempts. Alec Guinness is cartoonish perfection.

 

A Thousand Clowns (1965), a very special film to me. This movie makes a strong statement about freedom from the system, but also sacrifice for love. The first time I saw it I was filled with profound joy, but I find I'm a bit lack for words on how to summarize it.

 

The Green Room (1978), directed by and starring François Truffaut. A dreary film that is rather discomforting to watch, but it's powerful and haunting. Mr. Truffaut's strange and obsessive characterization is surprisingly good, and quite mesmerizing. This must be one of his most underrated films.

 

I'm so glad you started this thread, GenRipper. This is a great way to get honest recommendations from our knowledgeable members. I'll definitely be keeping track.

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I'm so glad you started this thread, GenRipper. This is a great way to get honest recommendations from our knowledgeable members. I'll definitely be keeping track.

Yeah, I'm totally stoked to be finding some movies that I want to see... My list of movies I want to see has been getting thin but not anymore!! Thanks, TCM fellow film junkies!!

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I've chosen some of my favorites which are rarely (or ever?) shown here:

 

The Adventures of Prince Achmed,1926 (oldest surviving animated feature film)

Juliet of the Spirits, 1965 (enchanting Fellini film)

Don't Look Now, 1973 (set in Venice, but no travelogue!)

The Draughtman's Contract, 1982 (Peter Greenaway)

Performance, 1970 (amazing movie about identity; sent James Fox out of movies for years)

A Wedding, 1978 (everyone has a secret)

Contempt,1963 (has one of the most extraordinary scenes in movies and Brigitte Bardot)

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I've chosen some of my favorites which are rarely (or ever?) shown here:

 

Don't Look Now, 1973 (set in Venice, but no travelogue!)

 

Quite right, Don't Look Now is no travelogue! It is a film so terrifying that it put a friend of mine into labor. She went from the movie theater to the hospital. 

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