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Actors Whose Images/Personas Have Not Aged Well


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Actually, Humphrey was not Vice-President at the time of the release of this film just over one week before President Kennedy was killed on November 22nd. Humphrey did not become VP until January, 1965, the start of Lyndon Johnson's only full-term of presidency.

Thank you for that clarification. From what I read though, Humphreys was a major supporter of the civil rights movement and of the development of social safety net programs that would be developed under Johnson's administration. 

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I do know that on the set of State of the Union, Katharine Hepburn and Adolphe Menjou only talked to each other when filming, because she was upset that he was so supportive of McCarthy. 

 

Hmmmm...sounds like me and one of the guys I play tennis with.

 

(...and who keeps sendin' me all those damn paranoid right-wing themed emails all the time that I keep tellin' him on the courts to stop sendin' to me!) LOL

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I also wonder if we could add Lana Turner to this list. She basically had two speeds; unapologetic sex goddess, or hardworking sex goddess in trying situations. I realize that much of this has to do with the studio, and she did lobby for meatier parts, but still.

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I was reading this conversation on my phone and logged on using my laptop to comment on this very topic.  There are so many teenage girls/women who claim that Marilyn Monroe and/or Audrey Hepburn are their favorite actress(es).  Usually these people will have either actresses' picture emblazoned on something they're wearing-- whether it's a shirt, purse, etc.  Me, having a genuine interest in classic film and in both Hepburn and Monroe, will ask what Monroe/Hepburn film is their favorite.  (Note: I don't ask this of strangers I see, just people I meet)  Usually the response I get is: "Oh, I've never seen one of her films." I'm always pleasantly surprised when they can actually answer the question.

 

I have an acquaintance who claims to be a "huge Marilyn Monroe fan."  Intrigued, I asked her what her favorite Monroe film was.  "Oh, I've never seen any of her films," she says.  "Mmhmm," I say.  Finally, I made her watch "Some Like it Hot" just so that she could at least have an answer to that question if anyone ever asks again.  Personally my favorite Monroe performance is "Niagara."  My favorite Hepburn performance is "Funny Face."

 

Monroe and Hepburn are enduring icons of classic Hollywood cinema and Hollywood in general, not because of any of their performances, but because of images perpetuated by the media.  Of course, many of these images are from classic films that Monroe and Hepburn appeared in, i.e. Marilyn's white dress scene from "The Seven Year Itch" and Hepburn's black dress from "Breakfast at Tiffany's."  However, I doubt that a majority of their "huge fans" would be able to identify which films the images were culled from.  Male stars who I think may fall into this category would be James Dean and John Wayne. 

 

Finally, as a side note to those who look up to Monroe because she shows that "heavier women are beautiful" (I read that in a thread further down), I wish that they'd actually watch one of Monroe's films and see that she was not all that heavy.  She wasn't svelte like her contemporary Audrey Hepburn; but really who is? Monroe's weight does fluctuate in her films; but for the most part, she is thin.  She isn't a size 14 or whatever it is that the media is claiming these days.  I'd say at the most, she was today's size 6 or 8.

 

The dissonance between the screen image and the manufactured one in terms of what sells (the t-shirts, mugs, posters, etc.) is glaring. Personally, I would rather have someone not buy anything altogether rather than only appreciate a small part of the performer's legacy.

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The dissonance between the screen image and the manufactured one in terms of what sells (the t-shirts, mugs, posters, etc.) is glaring. Personally, I would rather have someone not buy anything altogether rather than only appreciate a small part of the performer's legacy.

 

I'll bet my house Priscilla Presley doesn't feel this way!

 

(...a house, I might add, MUCH more modest than Graceland) ;)

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Hmmmm...sounds like me and one of the guys I play tennis with.

 

(...and who keeps sendin' me all those damn paranoid right-wing themed emails all the time that I keep tellin' him on the courts to stop sendin' to me!) LOL

Dargo, it seems your tennis partner might be suffering from hearing- only- things -he- wants- to- hear syndrome. I am afraid the only way to treat that on the tennis court is to beat him every time, as people like that hate to lose. 

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Dargo, and so long as it is a fair game of tennis and this person knows how to be a friend outside of the court. It would stink if this player was trying to coerce a response out of you out of the discomfort of his own skin and/or the lack of confidence in his own convictions that would lead him to pepper you that way. 

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Dargo, and so long as it is a fair game of tennis and this person knows how to be a friend outside of the court. It would stink if this player was trying to coerce a response out of you out of the discomfort of his own skin and/or the lack of confidence in his own convictions that would lead him to pepper you that way. 

 

Why are you whispering?

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The dissonance between the screen image and the manufactured one in terms of what sells (the t-shirts, mugs, posters, etc.) is glaring. Personally, I would rather have someone not buy anything altogether rather than only appreciate a small part of the performer's legacy.

I think that some of these "fans" don't really know what they're a "fan" of.  For me personally, to be a fan of someone, you have to be familiar with what they originally did to even make these images worthy of being mass produced.  Random non famous people typically don't have entire product lines of their faces made for them.  I am a fan of Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn and James Dean; but I'm also familiar with their work and am a fan of such.  I recognize that some of the people who wear clothes adorned with these images may genuinely be fans; but a majority of them are in love with the image of Monroe and Hepburn created by the media-- which is a shame that the real stories of these remarkable women weren't more well known.  At least give people a real reason to look up to them.  I doubt we'll see shirts showing off Hepburn's UNICEF work or Monroe's rise from a horrible childhood to international star. 

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The dissonance between the screen image and the manufactured one in terms of what sells (the t-shirts, mugs, posters, etc.) is glaring. Personally, I would rather have someone not buy anything altogether rather than only appreciate a small part of the performer's legacy.

I don't care for the crass commercialization of some of these film stars' iconic images. And I too think it disheartening when a teen may wear or carry an object with one of these images knows next to nothing about that star, even when stating that person is their favorite. ButI do feel a certain small percentage of these kids are intrigued enough to read up on Marilyn, Audrey, etc. and maybe even seek out their films. And this can be an entry for some into the world of classic.Hollywood films, something I feel we here are all in favor of.

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I don't care for the crass commercialization of some of these film stars' iconic images. And I too think it disheartening when a teen may wear or carry an object with one of these images knows next to nothing about that star, even when stating that person is their favorite. ButI do feel a certain small percentage of these kids are intrigued enough to read up on Marilyn, Audrey, etc. and maybe even seek out their films. And this can be an entry for some into the world of classic.Hollywood films, something I feel we here are all in favor of.

I agree that these images can be an entry into classic Hollywood film and I hope that those who will be more apt to seek out resources to learn about these stars will do so.  That's how I started out.  I was a Nick at Nite junkie when I was in middle school-- had all my homework done by 8 so that I could be ready to watch my shows.  I Love Lucy became an instant favorite and I, being far beyond the books geared toward middle schoolers, read all of the Lucille Ball biographies and the few books they had about I Love Lucy.  I then learned that Desi Arnaz had an autobiography that I was lucky enough to find for $5 in the bookstore in my town.  I have never seen a copy of that book on sale anywhere since then.  Anyway, from there, it snowballed into watching TCM (when it was part of the extended cable package) and AMC before it sucked.  I also used to watch a lot of episodes of A&E's Biography.  Anyway, I know that there have got to be other younger people out there as curious as I am who will seek out these people and I hope they do so. 

 

I just keep running into those who seem to have no interest to learn anything about the person on their shirt other than that they take pretty pictures...

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I think that some of these "fans" don't really know what they're a "fan" of.  For me personally, to be a fan of someone, you have to be familiar with what they originally did to even make these images worthy of being mass produced.  Random non famous people typically don't have entire product lines of their faces made for them.  I am a fan of Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn and James Dean; but I'm also familiar with their work and am a fan of such.  I recognize that some of the people who wear clothes adorned with these images may genuinely be fans; but a majority of them are in love with the image of Monroe and Hepburn created by the media-- which is a shame that the real stories of these remarkable women weren't more well known.  At least give people a real reason to look up to them.  I doubt we'll see shirts showing off Hepburn's UNICEF work or Monroe's rise from a horrible childhood to international star. 

 

If someone is fan of an artist they should be familiar with that artist's work,  but I don't see a need to know about that artist's 'real stories' (i.e.  their personal life).

 

So to me the 'real reason to look up to them' is based only on their work.   To respect them for their work especially if one is involved in the same art form.   .e.g.  I look up to certain jazz guitar players but based on how they play not because of what they did or didn't do in their private lives.

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I agree that these images can be an entry into classic Hollywood film and I hope that those who will be more apt to seek out resources to learn about these stars will do so.  That's how I started out.  I was a Nick at Nite junkie when I was in middle school-- had all my homework done by 8 so that I could be ready to watch my shows.  I Love Lucy became an instant favorite and I, being far beyond the books geared toward middle schoolers, read all of the Lucille Ball biographies and the few books they had about I Love Lucy.  I then learned that Desi Arnaz had an autobiography that I was lucky enough to find for $5 in the bookstore in my town.  I have never seen a copy of that book on sale anywhere since then.  Anyway, from there, it snowballed into watching TCM (when it was part of the extended cable package) and AMC before it sucked.  I also used to watch a lot of episodes of A&E's Biography.  Anyway, I know that there have got to be other younger people out there as curious as I am who will seek out these people and I hope they do so. 

 

I just keep running into those who seem to have no interest to learn anything about the person on their shirt other than that they take pretty pictures...

Well, I'm seven years younger than you and I'm already a classic film junkie (and have been since I was what, five?) so rest assured that there are at least some younger people who are invested in this history.

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