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Blackboard Jungle


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Wow - watching Blackboard Jungle on TCM now. What a great film. Vic Morrow deserved an award for his performance. He was one terrific actor.

I don't like Ford's performance. He's too touchy. I mean how realistic is it to tell kids not to talk while they're filing upstairs? Then Dad-di-oh goes into the john and starts pushing around Poitier. I think Louis Calhern has it right and Emile Meyer is a hoot.

 

"An' anyone who starts trouble gets trouble right back!"  :D 

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I don't like Ford's performance. He's too touchy. I mean how realistic is it to tell kids not to talk while they're filing upstairs?

 

You obviously didn't encounter the same sort of "Assistant Principals" in Jr. High and high school that some of us at a certain age did every day.

 

Then Dad-di-oh goes into the john and starts pushing around Poitier.

 

There was a famous English teacher in our DC high school, an ex-Marine and Korean War vet, who constantly threatened talkers to take them outside and "wrap [them] around a telephone pole," making them quickly back down.  52 years later he's still known among alumni as "Telephone Pole Shumaker".  He could've eaten Vic Morrow for breakfast.

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Jamie Farr as Klinger in MASH was the best part of the show. There was 1 kid in Blackboard Jungle that sat behind Vic Morrow and his only line in the film was to stand up at 1 point and say "Not the FBI". He was the only kid wearing a suit and tie. Some of the kids looked older than the teacher. By the way, which kid do you think threw the baseball at the blackboard as the teacher was writing on it?

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I don't like Ford's performance. He's too touchy. I mean how realistic is it to tell kids not to talk while they're filing upstairs?

 

You obviously didn't encounter the same sort of "Assistant Principals" in Jr. High and high school that some of us at a certain age did every day.

 

Then Dad-di-oh goes into the john and starts pushing around Poitier.

 

There was a famous English teacher in our DC high school, an ex-Marine and Korean War vet, who constantly threatened talkers to take them outside and "wrap [them] around a telephone pole," making them quickly back down.  52 years later he's still known among alumni as "Telephone Pole Shumaker".  He could've eaten Vic Morrow for breakfast.

I remember not being allowed to talk and being ranked by the scruff of the neck for no reason wow what the teachers got away with back in the day

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By the way, which kid do you think threw the baseball at the blackboard as the teacher was writing on it?

 

That would've been Joe Pepitone, AKA "Joe Pep", a notorious Brooklyn punk who later took his act to the Bronx and wound up on Riker's Island.  His real name was Giuseppe Peppiscutto or something like that, and he left a trail of broken bats all over the country from Boston to Anaheim.

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Evan Hunter's book was just as entertaining.  Dadier and Josh get beat up much worse in the book than the movie. 

 

There was a teacher at my high school who fancied himself a sort of intellectual.  A gym teacher I worked for always called him---"That sawed off little runt".  Anyway, the "runt" tried to bust me for smoking the one rare time I wasn't actually smoking in the john, but he claimed he knew it was me---his explanation:  "Some kids try to gtet away with it by blowing the smoke against the wall.  But all I had to do was follow the trajectory of the smoke and see it was you".  Really?  He might know Keats and Shelly, but didn't know squat about physics.  I've tried it many times afterwards, and never COULD get smoke to ricochet!

 

Sepiatone

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Andy - I was wondering which kid in the film Blackboard Jungle threw that baseball at the blackboard? I thought perhaps Miller (played by Sidney Poitier), but it could also have been thrown by Artie West (played by Vic Morrow)

 

It's been so long since I've seen Blackboard Jungle from beginning to end that I'm afraid I couldn't even begin to guess. :wacko:

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Jamie Farr as Klinger in MASH was the best part of the show. There was 1 kid in Blackboard Jungle that sat behind Vic Morrow and his only line in the film was to stand up at 1 point and say "Not the FBI". He was the only kid wearing a suit and tie. Some of the kids looked older than the teacher. By the way, which kid do you think threw the baseball at the blackboard as the teacher was writing on it?

Vic Morrow or Artie Shaw.... He was going to be the next Ted Bundy. One thing to be a bully, but the calling of the wife to tell her Glenn Ford was having an affair is just devious. It would be worse if he knew she was pregnant and was trying to make her miscarriage.

 

This reminds me of a true story from my childhood. I grew up in a tough school. There were no gangs but it was out in the country and the kids overall, were pretty out of control. I could tell you some stories (like now) but they are so weird/strange, most of you wouldn't believe them. Well, back to the bat cave.... When I was in 5th grade, a kid in our 7th grade class brought a starter pistol to school. When his 7th grade teacher started giving him some crap, he stood up and pointed the starter pistol at her and fired. She fainted and fell over backwards in her chair. This was bad, but the worse thing is that she lost a child (no one knew she was pregnant and the couple had been trying for a long time to get that way). It was a really bad tragedy.

 

We were spanked in grade school and high school all the time. My wife thinks I went to school in a cave... LOL. It was just a tough farming community (one of the few that didn't live on a farm), and the kids were mean. Like I said, I could tell some tales that would make you wonder why we all weren't in juvie.

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By the way, which kid do you think threw the baseball at the blackboard as the teacher was writing on it?

I would say it was Belatzi since the ball came from the left side of the room although Dadi-oh seemed to imply it was Miller.

 

It certainly wasn't Santini.  :)

 

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I would say it was Belatzi since the ball came from the left side of the room although Dadi-oh seemed to imply it was Miller.

 

It certainly wasn't Santini.  :)

 

 

 

Well maybe it was a very young Tom Seaver,  and the ball did come from the right side of the room,  but he just had one mean curve ball!

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A curious thing though, one could easily get the idea that director Brooks wanted Glenn Ford's Dadier to be seen as a somewhat flawed and even impatient character. Someone chucks a baseball at the chalkboard while Ford is writing his name and he makes a crack obviously aimed at Miller. Dadier says and I quote "Whoever you are, you'll never pitch for the yankees, boy."

 

Doesn't teacher Dadier kinda blow his righteousness right there with a crack like that? I mean how dumb is this guy Dadier?

Artie West is cute with the cracks right off and yet Dadier thinks it's Miller?

I guess Dadier didn't like his attitude in the john.  :)

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A curious thing though, one could easily get the idea that director Brooks wanted Glenn Ford's Dadier to be seen as a somewhat flawed and even impatient character. Someone chucks a baseball at the chalkboard while Ford is writing his name and he makes a crack obviously aimed at Miller. Dadier says and I quote "Whoever you are, you'll never pitch for the yankees, boy."
 
Doesn't teacher Dadier kinda blow his righteousness right there with a crack like that? I mean how dumb is this guy Dadier?
Artie West is cute with the cracks right off and yet Dadier thinks it's Miller?
I guess Dadier didn't like his attitude in the john.  :)

 

 

We used to say "boy" all the time to everybody.

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A curious thing though, one could easily get the idea that director Brooks wanted Glenn Ford's Dadier to be seen as a somewhat flawed and even impatient character. Someone chucks a baseball at the chalkboard while Ford is writing his name and he makes a crack obviously aimed at Miller. Dadier says and I quote "Whoever you are, you'll never pitch for the yankees, boy."
 
Doesn't teacher Dadier kinda blow his righteousness right there with a crack like that? I mean how dumb is this guy Dadier?
Artie West is cute with the cracks right off and yet Dadier thinks it's Miller?
I guess Dadier didn't like his attitude in the john.  :)

 

 

I agree that the producers\director\screenwriter wanted Dadier to be a somewhat flawed and even impatient character.   I believe this relates to him coming back from the war,  which is mentioned at the start of the movie.     Like many noir movies the impact war has on people is a common theme.     Poor Dadier;  he left one war scene for another!   ;)

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I was wondering if any caught that "bottle" thing that Vic Morrow did in the beginning of the film when the girl walks past and the guys were looking at her from inside the schoolyard fence and as she starts walking past Morrow, he did something really shocking and suggestive for that time period. I'm sure that wasn't scripted - but wonder how it obviously got past the censors.

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Why would he bring an expensive record collection to the school - especially where there are such trouble students?

 

Poor Kiley;   he felt music would smooth the savage Morrow.   But he clealry didn't understand the inter beast brewing inside the young man. 

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