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NOVEMBER SCHEDULE IS UP!


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So far... I see silent movies on Monday nights, it might be our SOTM. The spotlight appears to be something along the lines of "road" movies. I see no relistings of canceled films.

 

Thanks for the link!

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So far... I see silent movies on Monday nights, it might be our SOTM. The spotlight appears to be something along the lines of "road" movies. I see no relistings of canceled films.

 

Thanks for the link!

I think it was probably a little too late for the rescheduling of the Ingmar Bergman films bumped for Garner's tribute. And since December is devoted to holiday films and the selling of DVDs, DVDs and more DVDs of family classics, I would expect the Bergman batch to show up in January or March.

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I think it was probably a little too late for the rescheduling of the Ingmar Bergman films bumped for Garner's tribute. And since December is devoted to holiday films and the selling of DVDs, DVDs and more DVDs of family classics, I would expect the Bergman batch to show up in January or March.

 

Well, I may be alone, but I'm still holding out hope for the sci-fi Silent/Import of, you guessed it, The Mysterious Island and Genocide, (and The X From Outer Space, which was canceled, too) which were buried with Mickey Rooney. (Rest in peace, Mickey.)

 

(P.S, Now that I look again, I do see another Joe E. Brown tribute listed (oh sarcastic joy!) on the 24th, I don't know if it's all the same films. And one Ingmar Bergman film, Wild Strawberries.)

Edited by Kay
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Hey, I just remembered, we never got our silent Oliver Twist when it was canceled last December (for Joan Fontaine/Peter O'Toole day, I think), along with some Import that was going to be a follow-up to that depressing one with the donkey. There's something to expect come December. I doubt I'll be getting my sci-fi flicks, though.

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I'm happy to see that Navy Blues (1941) is on the schedule for November 18. It was a Million Dollar Movie favorite in the old, old, days. It's a lot of fun, with a hilarious performance by Martha Raye and some good songs, the best of which is sung by Ann Sheridan.

 

Also noteworthy from my POV: Five Million Years to Earth (aka Quatermass and the Pit) on November 22. One of the most literate sci-fi/horror movies, ever.

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Also noteworthy from my POV: Five Million Years to Earth (aka Quatermass and the Pit) on November 22. One of the most literate sci-fi/horror movies, ever.

 

Except they've shown it at least 6 times in the past 2 years

 

Where, oh where, is 'Enemy from Space' (aka Quatermass 2)?

 

A lost classic.

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Except they've shown it at least 6 times in the past 2 years

 

Where, oh where, is 'Enemy from Space' (aka Quatermass 2)?

 

A lost classic.

Haven't seen QII in yonks. Btw, if you want to talk about frequent repeats, just look at what's showing on November 1 at 11:45 PM. No don't look -- I'll give you one guess!

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Seems like more repeats than usual, but I'm glad they're running those Richard Dix Whistler movies again.  I loaned a set of them to a friend, but I've yet to get them back in two years, and he lives way across the river.

 

IMO the most "intriguing" title comes on the last night of the month:

 

2:30 AM Army, The (1944)  

A sickly young man from a military family fights to earn a place in the Japanese Army.

 

BW-87 mins,

 

 How many Japanese movies made during the war are we likely to see?  Here's a description from the "Cinema Talk" website:

 

Rikugun / The Army (1944)

10 03 2013

It might be some good luck on my part, but it seems that most of the WWII-era Japanese films I’ve managed to see haven’t seemed too propagandic.  I wouldn’t say they’re all subversive, but the restrictions that came into play in 1939 didn’t seem to trouble directors like Mizoguchi, Ozu, or Naruse. This film, one of Keisuke Kinoshita’s earliest efforts, is strikingly anti-war. Kinoshita’s pacifism would resurface, but it feels particularly strong here, especially because he’s projecting it in a film that was intended to be pro-war. It’s not exactly a great film, but it’s statement is particularly powerful considering the context.

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The story begins with a young Tomosuke, being taught about his (and everyone else’s) duties towards the emperor. Years pass, Tomosuke was involved in a war peripherally and he now has a family. We see him force the same values into his son, Shintaro, who he fears to be somewhat weak, much like the way he was. Still, through the constant preaching from him and his wife, Waka, Shintaro grows to an athletic young man. He’s called into the army quickly, in a role that we expect to be of greater importance than Tomosuke’s.

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On paper, this probably seemed like an ideal setup for the government officials supervising the film, but Kinoshita takes approaches all the concepts of duty, honor, and so on in a (justified) negative light. There’s scenes where Tomosuke, played by Chishu Ryu somewhat out of his element in a “louder” role, micromanages his son’s behavior. Oddly, he’s critical of his wife, Waka (Kinuyo Tanaka) when she does the same thing. It’s all very much on the nose, which would be problematic and enough to dismiss a film in a different context. However, the fact that Kinoshita managed to make such an anti-war film out from a pro-war sentiment is impressive enough on its own, even if the film itself doesn’t seem exactly like anything great.

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There are many inspired moments here. The film might be worth a viewing on the grounds that this is one of the few times (the only?) where we get to see Chishu Ryu and Kinuyo Tanaka be a married couple. Unfortunately, Kinoshita’s style doesn’t exactly give them time or space for performances they were capable of in the hands of much better directors. Still, Tanaka’s famous final sequence, while didactic, is absolutely wonderful. It begins with a minute-long static shot of Tanaka’s face, and then follows her as she tries to reach her war-bound son, in the middle of a military parade. This isn’t even the best film I’ve seen from Kinoshita but obviously, it’s hard to fault an effort as passionate as this one. Usually, this earnestness is a fault in his films, but he channels into a nice way here.

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SADIE THOMPSON with Gloria Swanson is scheduled for November 3 as part of the Star of the Month tribute to silent stars.

Presumably stills will be used to cover the footage from the missing last reel of the movie.

 

That night POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL with Mary Pickford and IT with Clara Bow are also scheduled.

 

And PANDORA'S BOX is scheduled during the late night.

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SADIE THOMPSON with Gloria Swanson is scheduled for November 3 as part of the Star of the Month tribute to silent stars.

Presumably stills will be used to cover the footage from the missing last reel of the movie.

 

That night POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL with Mary Pickford and IT with Clara Bow are also scheduled.

 

And PANDORA'S BOX is scheduled during the late night.

 

Those are all among the best movies of the month, although this will be the 4th time in recent years we've seen Pandora's Box.  Just for variety, it'd be nice to get Diary of a Lost Girl for a change.  It's 98% as good as Pandora's Box, with very much the same Brooks character, trapped in a situation that if anything is even more horrific.

 

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So we have two movies by Jean-Pierre Melville, and while Makavejev is not my favorite Eastern European director, or even my favorite Yugoslav director, having two of his movies sounds interesting.  And we're having Rohmer's Summer!  Yay!  I must confess I've never heard of Keisuke Kinoshita, though it makes sense that mid-century Japan would have more than four great directors.

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And we're having Rohmer's Summer!  Yay!

 

Triple yay!  That's part of Rohemer's "Comedies of the Four Seasons" series, and what a treat it'd be to see them all run together.  Throw in his six "Comedies and Proverbs" and his better known  "Six Moral Tales", and you'd have more than enough to fill one of the best SUTS days in TCM history. All 16 of these are among the greatest "slice of life" films ever made by any director.

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And we're having Rohmer's Summer!  Yay!

 

Triple yay!  That's part of Rohemer's "Comedies of the Four Seasons" series, and what a treat it'd be to see them all run together.  Throw in his six "Comedies and Proverbs" and his better known  "Six Moral Tales", and you'd have more than enough to fill one of the best SUTS days in TCM history. All 16 of these are among the greatest "slice of life" films ever made by any director.

  But which Rohmeresque "Summer" is it? He has two. "A Summer's Tale" is brilliant -- that's the one that's part of the quartet. The "Summer" that is called "Le Rayon Vert" in French is not one of my favorites.

 

Alas, I just checked. The one TCM is showing is not the one that's part of the quartet. It is the one that in French is "Le Rayon Vert." It's a highly regarded film; just not one of my favorites, whereas "A Summer's Tale" is as joyous a film as has ever graced the silver screen!

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I see I was confusing the titles, but the one I like the better of the two is the one that is actually  going to be playing, Le Rayon Vert.  Which means that by showing "Comedies of the Four Seasons" in its entirety, TCM can have four premieres in a row!

 

(Well, I can dream, can't I?)

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I see I was confusing the titles, but the one I like the better of the two is the one that is actually  going to be playing, Le Rayon Vert.  Which means that by showing "Comedies of the Four Seasons" in its entirety, TCM can have four premieres in a row!

 

(Well, I can dream, can't I?)

And maybe one day TCM will show Rohmer's very serious The Marquise of O, a very special film.

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I love that all three "That's Entertainment" movies AND "That's Dancing" are scheduled for Thanksgiving afternoon. Good counter-programming to football on a family-oriented holiday. Does anyone know anything about "TCM's A Night at the Movies: Fantasy" (2014)? It's programmed for 8 and 11:15 PM in hour-and-a-quarter slots, with a listed running time of 0 mins. and no descriptive info. I'm assuming it's a new original production, but I'd love to know more about it. 

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For me, the big news in November (the 23rd) is the showing of Leslie Howard's 1933 Berkeley Square for which he received a Best Actor Oscar nomination.  The film is virtually impossible to obtain.  I'm not sure if it has even been aired on TCM previously.

Second would be The Last Command on November 17 which is one of the films Emil Jannings won his Best Actor Oscar for.  That has proven hard to see too. 

I'm also happy to see La Cienaga, the Argentinian film by Lucretia Martel playing on the 23rd.

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For me, the big news in November (the 23rd) is the showing of Leslie Howard's 1933 Berkeley Square for which he received a Best Actor Oscar nomination.  The film is virtually impossible to obtain.  I'm not sure if it has even been aired on TCM previously.

Second would be The Last Command on November 17 which is one of the films Emil Jannings won his Best Actor Oscar for.  That has proven hard to see too. 

I'm also happy to see La Cienaga, the Argentinian film by Lucretia Martel playing on the 23rd.

It was on within the last year or two I believe. I'm glad they're showing it again, as I accidentally erased it before watching.

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