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Watergate and John Dean


noah80
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  I once saw this PBS program about Watergate, apparently before the scandal John Dean had a different image with his long hair. But when Dean had to testify during the Watergate trial, he tried to change his image by getting a hair cut and putting on glasses.  (maybe he was going for a nerdy image).  In any case, it seems to me he put a lot of effort in trying to change his image.  Which is why I find it difficult to believe his words.

 This incident is not noted much in the media.  It would be great if someone could comment or elaborate on this.

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  I once saw this PBS program about Watergate, apparently before the scandal John Dean had a different image with his long hair. But when Dean had to testify during the Watergate trial, he tried to change his image by getting a hair cut and putting on glasses.  (maybe he was going for a nerdy image).  In any case, it seems to me he put a lot of effort in trying to change his image.  Which is why I find it difficult to believe his words.
 This incident is not noted much in the media.  It would be great if someone could comment or elaborate on this.

 

 

I got SICK of the Watergate hearings back then (only 4 channels on the TV). Wonder how big of a deal if all those tapes were converted to MP3 , transferred to a single flash drive and placed on Nixon's desk. No one will pay any attention, would they.  LOL!

 

The reel to reel era

0724nixontapesB.jpg

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  I once saw this PBS program about Watergate, apparently before the scandal John Dean had a different image with his long hair. But when Dean had to testify during the Watergate trial, he tried to change his image by getting a hair cut and putting on glasses.  (maybe he was going for a nerdy image).  In any case, it seems to me he put a lot of effort in trying to change his image.  Which is why I find it difficult to believe his words.
 This incident is not noted much in the media.  It would be great if someone could comment or elaborate on this.

 

 

 

John Dean looked like the preppy he meant to be when he worked in the Nixon White House. He might have grown his hair longer and tried to change his image in the aftermath of Watergate but I always remember him as we see him in the video clips from back then, a preppy looking lawyer who lost sight of his morals when he needed them most.

 

 

Are you sure you aren't thinking of another White House staffer?

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  I once saw this PBS program about Watergate, apparently before the scandal John Dean had a different image with his long hair. But when Dean had to testify during the Watergate trial, he tried to change his image by getting a hair cut and putting on glasses.  (maybe he was going for a nerdy image).  In any case, it seems to me he put a lot of effort in trying to change his image.  Which is why I find it difficult to believe his words.
 This incident is not noted much in the media.  It would be great if someone could comment or elaborate on this.

 

 

If you were advising a gang member who was going to trial would you tell him to continue to look like a gang member or try to get him to wear a suit, ensure his tattoos are covered up,  get a hair cut etc..?      Would you find that gang member more truthful keep their original look? 

 

Most defense attorneys would advise their client to change their image,  but maybe that POV backfires on some jury members.

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4a93cf759b09c05fab5851cd598f1147.jpg

Theodore Bundy and John Dean at a Young

Republicans meeting, circa 1968.

 

OMG!!! THE "Ted Bundy", eh?!

 

Well, as Churchill once famously remarked: "If you're young and a Conservative, you have no heart......."!!!

 

(...I ain't gonna continue on with that quote of that pudgy little English bulldog's, 'cause he ONLY got the FIRST part of that famous line correct!!!)

 

LOL

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I went back and put the just kiddin' eye wink emoticon on it because

it's not really Ted Bundy or John Dean, though there is a bit of a

resemblance. I just remember reading that Bundy, before he took

a different career path, was involved in the GOP.  Insert your own

joke here.

 

LBJ grew his hair long after he got out of office. Weird.

 

Oh...okay.

 

(...but I think my Churchill quote STILL might apply here, RIGHT?!) ;)

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Oh oh, we've got trouble, right here in river city. Like so many famous quotes,

Chruchill's one about heart and brains is misattributed, IOW, there is no

evidence that he ever said it. I've seen it in a number of places over the

years and sometimes it is attributed to other people, who didn't say it either.

Anyhow, it's a pretty silly overgeneralization. Even if Winny didn't say it,

I'm still not a big fan and I'll leave it at that.

 

 

Hmmmm...then how about the one where he supposedly told some women who was aghast at his over-imbibing: "Yes Madam, but tomorrow morning I will be sober, whereas you will still be ugly!"???

 

(...not that Winny was ever the most handsome man in the world anyway, you understand) ;)

 

(...OH, btw...yes, I agree with you...whoEVER said that earlier one WAS guilty of an over-generalization...no doubt about it) 

Edited by Dargo
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The disillusionment keeps on coming. Sorry. He was supposed to have said that to Lady Nancy Astor,

but alas, it is doubtful he ever did. There is also a supposed second dialogue betwen the same two

people. LNA: If I were your wife, I'd put poison in your coffee. WC: If I were your husband, I'd drink it.

As witty as these exchnages are, they didn't happen. You'd be surprised how many of the well-known

quotes we take for granted were never actually said. To balance things out a bit, most of Uncle Joe

Stalin's "wtticisms," such as One death is a tragedy, a million is a statistic, are also false. Live and

learn, live and learn. :)

 

Well, if you're NOW gonna tell me that that old Mississippi riverboat pilot never said, "The report of my death was an exaggeration!"(yeah, yeah...I looked THAT one up to get the PRECISE quote, so THERE!!!) I'm gonna be in a big ol' funk ALL weekend, dude!!! ;)

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During the Watergate hearings I bought a bumper sticker saying Nixon is a Coxshucker, referring to the ousting of special prosecutor Archibald Cox.  My mother wouldn't let me put it on the car.

 

Not that offensive to some as this one.

 

$(KGrHqQOKosE6e)dl0OrBOozEhchwQ~~60_35.J

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Cheer up. That one is the real deal, though it's probably better known as the paraphrase 'The

reports of my death were greatly exaggerated.' That's fairly common too--the paraphrase is better

known than the actual quote. Just by coincidence, the local PBS station is repeating Ken Burns'

2002 documentary about Mark Twain late at night, not sure why though.

 

Probably because there is a new documentary out about Hal Holbrook's one man show about Mark Twain.

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One of my grandmothers was a pretty staunch Republican, Nixon supporter, and Yankees'

fan (strike three). She had a few mini-meltdowns during the whole Watergate affair. We

tried not to to rag her too much, but sometimes we just couldn't help ourselves. Jail to

the Chief.

The hearings were riveting, really fascinating TV.  I imagine they would have been hard for Nixon supporters, with new revelations coming out every day.  Not to mention the whole cast of characters involved!  

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My aunt (being retired) never missed a day of the hearings,  partly for she didn't trust Nixon since the Checkers era, and she thought it much better drama than the soap opera she used to watch.   After the Nixon's resignation, she really didn't go back to watching the soap operas either.   

 

A few weeks after she passed away in '82 we went to the home she owned to clear things out.  She had saved all the articles on the Watergate hearings, carefully and chronologically in a scrapbook, and had framed the front page of the Minneapolis Tribune "President Resigns!"  Big banner headline.  

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Oh, yeah....the "expletive deleted" thing.  Comic Robert Kline once went on about how the Watergate hearings brought about ridiculously bloated language with phrases like..."At that point in time"   Kline would rapidly blink his eyes and ask..."You mean THEN?"  or mention the other..."At this point in time", and, blinking his eyes rapidly would ask, "You mean NOW?"   As hilarious as some of the testimony you'd hear.

 

And the fact that a thug like J. Gordon Liddy would actually become some sort of CELEBRITY!  Akk!

 

Sepiatone

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My aunt (being retired) never missed a day of the hearings,  partly for she didn't trust Nixon since the Checkers era, and she thought it much better drama than the soap opera she used to watch.   After the Nixon's resignation, she really didn't go back to watching the soap operas either.   

 

A few weeks after she passed away in '82 we went to the home she owned to clear things out.  She had saved all the articles on the Watergate hearings, carefully and chronologically in a scrapbook, and had framed the front page of the Minneapolis Tribune "President Resigns!"  Big banner headline.  

 

Casa,

 

Your grandmother and I probably would have gotten along like gangbusters during that era. I was in high school and, like her, found the story riveting.

 

I have a shelf of books about Watergate in my library including "Woodstein's" All the President's Men, Jimmy Breslin's How the Good Guys Finally Won, Leon Jarowski's book and many, many more.

 

Wish I could have seen your gram's scrapebook!

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LZ, I wonder about that scrapbook now too.  I will check with my brother to see if he has it. While at that time I was working during the day, I could only see the compilation at night on the news and the revelations of the WH staff of what was to them business as usual.    I do remember my aunt telling me which members of the committee she seemed to think were handling the questions better.   She was partial to the Senate committee member Inouye, and liked his line of questioning.   I do remember a sense of professionalism and decorum we don't see now.

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Ah, right you are.  Like I really CARE what it really was.  But, it WAS "G".  Probably stood for "GOON".

 

Sepiatone

 

I did learn one thing from Liddy and that was how to deal with fear.   I read about how he got over his fear of rats,  he ate them.   Now I didn't do that but I did face my fears head on;   e.g. handle snakes until there was no more fear,   look at bugs close up etc.... 

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