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Favorite DISASTER movie of all-time...


GenRipper66
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Sitting here in the middle of the pond, I was wondering what some fans favorite DISASTER movie of all-time was... I grew up in the age of the all-star cast suffering through calamities or some plane disaster that occurred each year inexplicably.
 
First one that comes to mind is...  John Ford's The Hurricane (1937)
 
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This isn't my favorite, just the most appropriate.  'Favorite' can also mean a bad movie, like mine... Black Sunday (1977).

 

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I'm not a fan of disaster movies, General Ripper, but I guess I know why, with your current situation, you thought of THE HURRICANE. Presumably nothing will happen in the next few days to approximate anything that occurred in that John Ford production.

 

But that Ford film is a favourite of mine. It's a Ford film which Ford buffs almost never talk about, yet I think it's one of the best films of his career. Still stunning special effects plus a great cast of character actors (Thomas Mitchell, John Carradine, C. Aubrey Smith, Raymond Massey), with Jon Hall and Dorothy Lamour quite serviceable in the leads. And that great Moon of Manakoora score by Alfred Newman!

 

Hurricane2_zps274bb7a7.jpg

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I'm not a fan of disaster movies, General Ripper, but I guess I know why, with your current situation, you thought of THE HURRICANE. Presumably nothing will happen in the next few days to approximate anything that occurred in that John Ford production.

 

But that Ford film is a favourite of mine. It's a Ford film which Ford buffs almost never talk about, yet I think it's one of the best films of his career. Still stunning special effects plus a great cast of character actors (Thomas Mitchell, John Carradine, C. Aubrey Smith, Raymond Massey), with Jon Hall and Dorothy Lamour quite serviceable in the leads. And that great Moon of Manakoora score by Alfred Newman!

 

 

I totally agree about the special effects.  One of the longest storm sequences ever and the models built were pretty amazing. 

 

I live on Kauai so we are far up the chain from all the activity and it looks like we are going to straddle Iselle and Julio.  That's the goal, at least, because we remember Iniki all too well.  Key is to be up the mountain and away from the beaches.  Winds can suck but the storm surge is always the killer... Speaking of which... Winds are really beginning to pick up.  :mellow:

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I totally agree about the special effects.  One of the longest storm sequences ever and the models built were pretty amazing. 

 

I live on Kauai so we are far up the chain from all the activity and it looks like we are going to straddle Iselle and Julio.  That's the goal, at least, because we remember Iniki all too well.  Key is to be up the mountain and away from the beaches.  Winds can suck but the storm surge is always the killer... Speaking of which... Winds are really beginning to pick up.  :mellow:

 

First I want to say that I hope all turns out OK for you.    I'm also a fan of The Hurricane.    As noted,  many fine actors in the film but I want to mention Mary Astor and Raymond Massey.     Funny I forget it was directed by John Ford.   I guess I'm not use to seeing a Ford film with so much water.    In those Monument Valley pictures getting water is often a storyline.   

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First I want to say that I hope all turns out OK for you.    I'm also a fan of The Hurricane.    As noted,  many fine actors in the film but I want to mention Mary Astor and Raymond Massey.     Funny I forget it was directed by John Ford.   I guess I'm not use to seeing a Ford film with so much water.    In those Monument Valley pictures getting water is often a storyline.   

 

Well, ya know James. MISTER ROBERTS wasn't exactly filmed in the Mojave ya know. But yeah, I can see what ya meant here. ;)

 

And yep, GR. Hope you ride out those storms with relative ease.

 

(...and btw...I'm gonna put in a plug for the Gable/MacDonald/Tracy movie SAN FRANCISCO here)

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(...and btw...I'm gonna put in a plug for the Gable/MacDonald/Tracy movie SAN FRANCISCO here)

I have to say that San Francisco would have been my second choice. That earthquake sequnce is still as stunner, particularly that moment in which you see the street splitting into two.

 

I suspect the realize that Ford buffs dismiss The Hurricane is because the film falls into the category of South Seas adventure films. Even though it's unquestionably the best of that genre, it's still a genre not looked upon with much respect. (Think of all those sarong films with both Lamour and Hall, the two leads of this film, continuing in those lesser projects).

 

While Ford buffs will be forever extolling the virtues of the director's westerns, don't hold your breath that The Hurricane will ever receive the same attention. And that's a shame. Quite frankly, I'd rather watch this beautifully photographed production than many of Ford's more celebrated films.

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I have to say that San Francisco would have been my second choice. That earthquake sequnce is still as stunner, particularly that moment in which you see the street splitting into two.

 

I suspect the realize that Ford buffs dismiss The Hurricane is because the film falls into the category of South Seas adventure films. Even though it's unquestionably the best of that genre, it's still a genre not looked upon with much respect. (Think of all those sarong films with both Lamour and Hall, the two leads of this film, continuing in those lesser projects).

 

While Ford buffs will be forever extolling the virtues of the director's westerns, don't hold your breath that The Hurricane will ever receive the same attention. And that's a shame. Quite frankly, I'd rather watch this beautifully photographed production than many of Ford's more celebrated films.

 

Funny thing is that THE HURRICANE is actually more than just a "South Seas adventure film" as you know, Tom. It actually might be one of the first films in which Ford explores the issue of "Culture Clash", and which when one thinks about it is a reoccurring theme in his most remembered for genres, the Western.

 

It also has an element of "Les Miserables" in it, what with the story primarily being the tale of an man being relentlessly hounded by a martinet.

 

(...yep, if it WERE just a "South Seas adventure film", it wouldn't be as interesting as it is...at least to ME anyway)

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Funny thing is that THE HURRICANE is actually more than just a "South Seas adventure film" as you know, Tom. It actually might be one of the first films in which Ford explores the issue of "Culture Clash", and which when one thinks about it is a reoccurring theme in his most remembered for genres, the Western.

 

It also has an element of "Les Miserables" in it, what with the story primarily being the tale of an man being relentlessly hounded by a martinet.

 

(...yep, if it WERE just a "South Seas adventure film", it wouldn't be as interesting as it is...at least to ME anyway)

Great point, Dargo, as to why THE HURRICANE is more than just a film with special effects.

 

It's a dramatically involving story about racial intolerance, long before all that wind and water arrives.

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I was never much of a fan of the disaster movie genre. While I think it was 'Airport' that started that whole all-star cast silliness - and it, along with 'The Poseidon Adventure', were reasonably entertaining at the time - very quickly the 70's began to ring up more and more boring entries that were mostly an insult to the formerly glorious actors who appeared in them.

 

So, my all time favorite has to be 'City on Fire' (1979) - the final entry of the 70's and just an overall flop of a movie with the fading stars (Henry Fonda, Ava Gardner, Leslie Neilsen, Shelley Winters, Susan Clark, Barry Newman and James Franciscus) sleepwalking through their roles.

 

But, there's just something about it. One critic put it best, I think, when he said it's "almost eerie in its badness". That's exactly how it feels - not good, but eerie.

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Would Roy Ward Baker's "A Night to Remember" (1958) qualify in this category?

I would think so, if a film like Towering Inferno qualifies.

I guess "Key Largo" (1948) only had a disaster backdrop and the 'disaster' itself was not the focus.

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post-35686-0-10054800-1407532224_thumb.jpg

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So, my all time favorite has to be 'City on Fire' (1979) - the final entry of the 70's and just an overall flop of a movie with the fading stars (Henry Fonda, Ava Gardner, Leslie Neilsen, Shelley Winters, Susan Clark, Barry Newman and James Franciscus) sleepwalking through their roles.

 

But, there's just something about it. One critic put it best, I think, when he said it's "almost eerie in its badness". That's exactly how it feels - not good, but eerie.

Ooh, ooh... I want to see this one. I got to a point where I basically tuned out a lot of the disaster movies and I apparently missed this one. I have a new appreciation for bad disaster movies after they showed that horrible 'Earthquake' (1974) movie recently where the stunt rider became one of the main heroes. Yuck... It also begs the question... Did Ava Gardner ever meet a disaster movie script she turned down?! Wow... And whatever happened to Marjoe Gortner?! He was in everything in the 70s.

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I was never much of a fan of the disaster movie genre. While I think it was 'Airport' that started that whole all-star cast silliness - and it, along with 'The Poseidon Adventure', were reasonably entertaining at the time - very quickly the 70's began to ring up more a and more boring entries that were mostly an insult to the formerly glorious actors who appeared in them.

 

So, my all time favorite has to be 'City on Fire' (1979) - the final entry of the 70's and just an overall flop of a movie with the fading stars (Henry Fonda, Ava Gardner, Leslie Neilsen, Shelley Winters, Susan Clark, Barry Newman and James Franciscus) sleepwalking through their roles.

 

But, there's just something about it. One critic put it best, I think, when he said it's "almost eerie in its badness". That's exactly how it feels - not good, but eerie.

I happened to be around when pals were working on City on Fire and a few of the leading ladies were quite drunk most of the time.  Could you blame them?  Anyway when it came to looping afterward it was a case of putting sober words into mouths that were slurring and going every which way on the screen.  Not easy.  Perhaps it would be something to look for if viewing again.

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I agree with previous posts about "The Hurricane" being a good disaster film with regards to nature and human relationships!  For me though, I have to go with "The Poseidon Adventure".  Another film, which I have not seen, but got pretty good reviews was "Alive", although I realize this modern-day version of "What Really Happened to the Donner Party" would not be everyone's 'cup of tea'.  "San Francisco" and "Airport" were good too, and among my personal favorites.

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Just you let you know, Dargo, we did film MISTER ROBERTS in the Mojave, we just happened to use a LOT of blue paint for the background, :P

 

Oh...yeah...sorry, Mr.R.

 

I forgot about this still taken during the production shoot of that flick here...

 

ships-high-dry-aral-sea.jpg

 

(...don't worry...I won't forget again) ;)

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Sitting here in the middle of the pond, I was wondering what some fans favorite DISASTER movie of all-time was... I grew up in the age of the all-star cast suffering through calamities or some plane disaster that occurred each year inexplicably.

 

 

 

I just recently watched "Pompeii" (2014) and it is better than expected and what critics said about.

 

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"Deep Impact" (1998) great SFX's on a budget

 

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"2012" (200) good movie and that's one disaster that didn't eventually happen (like the 2000 end of the world Y2K bug, LM_AO).  The scene of the Earth crust displacement might have solved part of Noah's flood - by the way its ironic in the film, Arks were used  (made in China). Planning to watch "Noah" (2014) Saturday. Guess those Mayans were good practical jokers. Excellent SFX regardless

 

Scene-from-2012-directed--001.jpg

 

mayan-calendar-stone-ancient.jpg

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"Noah" (2014) was good, about time somebody finally got the shape of the Ark correct.  After all why go through all trouble in forming/shaping a bow if it has no function in this case - plus the box shape (as shown in past  ship tank test simulators) to be virtually unsinkable.

 

I recognized the Gnostic statement within the film but stretched dramatic license to the breaking point.

 

Like the way the producer illustrated how some animals might have appeared, i.e. the one dying at the beginning.

I've read some of the condemnations in other blogs (movie is a different type of "disaster")...well as the saying goes.,  When it rain, it pours.

 

 

Ark.jpg

 

 

The box shaped Ark concept has been around for awhile, but never portrayed in any film.

 

noahsark.jpg

 

 

Disclaimer: ...no CGI generated animals were harmed in the filming of this movie. :P 

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I am not a fan of disaster movies either, but one of my guilty pleasures is Independence Day, which is a sort of a send-up of every disaster film made--the uncaring bureaucrats, the courageous leader, the adorable child (2 of them!), the antihero, the scientist who everyone doubts, but who saves the day, the loser who redeems himself by sacrificing his life to save the day, any number of contrived coincidences (what are the odds that the guy who figures out the alien countdown would have an ex-wife who just happens to work for the president? or that aliens capable of interplanetary travel used Apple computers?) etc, etc. And the Dog and Cute Child in Jeopardy. I remember sitting in the theatre the first time I saw it and listing them all as they happened. 

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