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News: SUTS Schedule Change on August 16


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I updated the changes over on the TCM Programs forum. 

 

DUEL IN THE SUN has been dropped from Herbert Marshall's day (it will still air later in August for Joseph Cotten's tribute) and so has THE LADY CONSENTS (off the schedule entirely). In their place we now have the Crawford version of WHEN LADIES MEET, ANDY HARDY'S BLONDE TROUBLE and TROUBLE IN PARADISE.

 

The times have changed slightly for the other morning films. The primetime schedule for August 16 has not changed.

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I updated the changes over on the TCM Programs forum. 

 

DUEL IN THE SUN has been dropped from Herbert Marshall's day (it will still air later in August for Joseph Cotten's tribute) and so has THE LADY CONSENTS (off the schedule entirely). In their place we now have the Crawford version of WHEN LADIES MEET, ANDY HARDY'S BLONDE TROUBLE and TROUBLE IN PARADISE.

 

The times have changed slightly for the other morning films. The primetime schedule for August 16 has not changed.

 

Well some good news there and some not so good.  I wanted to see The Lady Consents with Ann Harding,  but I don't need to see Duel in the Sun again.      While I enjoy When Ladies Meet TCM does show this fairly often since it features 3 stars other than Marshall (Crawford, Garson, and Robert Taylor).    Trouble in Paradise is great but that was just on when TCM had the Kay Francis tribute.   Oh well,   it is what it is.

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Well some good news there and some not so good.  I wanted to see The Lady Consents with Ann Harding,  but I don't need to see Duel in the Sun again.      While I enjoy When Ladies Meet TCM does show this fairly often since it features 3 stars other than Marshall (Crawford, Garson, and Robert Taylor).    Trouble in Paradise is great but that was just on when TCM had the Kay Francis tribute.   Oh well,   it is what it is.

Yes, and TROUBLE IN PARADISE is also lined up for the Pre-codes spotlight in September. 

 

I am glad DUEL IN THE SUN was removed from his day-- it is a long film and he does not have a substantial amount of screen time in it. At least with WHEN LADIES MEET, his character is much more relevant to the plot.

 

I had forgotten he made an Andy Hardy movie. I guess he was slumming for awhile at MGM before he returned to roles in more prestigious cinematic projects.

 

I hope the Ann Harding picture, THE LADY CONSENTS, is rescheduled in December or January.

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... I had forgotten he made an Andy Hardy movie. I guess he was slumming for awhile at MGM before he returned to roles in more prestigious cinematic projects. ...

 

"Slumming" in an Andy Hardy picture?  Hold your tongue!  ;)

The Hardy pictures may not be prestigious, but they're good, solid entertainment, and Herbert Marshall, as Dr. Standish, the dean of Wainwright College in ANDY HARDY'S BLONDE TROUBLE, makes this one even more solid!  With Andy off at college and Judge Hardy back in Carvel, Marshall stepped in as the father figure whose good advice Andy inevitably ignores.  Marshall was just right in the role, and how much more can you ask of an actor?  A good example of his lighter work.

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No one slums in Carvel and I absolutely love Andy Hardy pictures;  everyone is respected by Judge Hardy regardless of their position in society and truth and ethics even win out...especially after Andy learns his lesson.  No one is slumming in an Andy Hardy movie, it helped the career Judy Garland with loads of experience and always makes me nostalgic for the days of neighborhoods and gas stations with attendants. 

 

Herbert Marshall is an exemplary artist for Andy Hardy and it takes him out of his "poor me" roles found in The Letter and The Little Foxes, among others his characters had to suffer through. 

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No one slums in Carvel and I absolutely love Andy Hardy pictures;  everyone is respected by Judge Hardy regardless of their position in society and truth and ethics even win out...especially after Andy learns his lesson.  No one is slumming in an Andy Hardy movie, it helped the career Judy Garland with loads of experience and always makes me nostalgic for the days of neighborhoods and gas stations with attendants. 

 

Herbert Marshall is an exemplary artist for Andy Hardy and it takes him out of his "poor me" roles found in The Letter and The Little Foxes, among others his characters had to suffer through. 

 

Judy Garland was young and just starting her career.   Most actors in their early years just want to work so they get exposure. 

 

Marshall was a very experienced actor that was the lead male actor in many high quaility productions prior to him being cast in a Hardy movie.

 

Ok,  maybe 'slumming' isn't the right term,   but I get where TB is coming from.     Funny you mention The Letter and The Little Foxes.   I'm assuming Marshall really welcomed being cast in those first rate 'A' pictures,  but not so much being cast as a character type actor in a Rooney picture.    Under the studio system actors had to play the role assigned to them or face suspension (which means NO paycheck).

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Ok,  maybe 'slumming' isn't the right term,   but I get where TB is coming from.     Funny you mention The Letter and The Little Foxes.   I'm assuming Marshall really welcomed being cast in those first rate 'A' pictures,  but not so much being cast as a character type actor in a Rooney picture.    Under the studio system actors had to play the role assigned to them or face suspension (which means NO paycheck).

Yes. And while the Rooney-Hardy films are enjoyable, they are not as prestigious as other offerings from the period. Shortly after this, Marshall was no longer at MGM-- he was appearing in high-brow classics like THE ENCHANTED COTTAGE and THE RAZOR'S EDGE.

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Yes. And while the Rooney-Hardy films are enjoyable, they are not as prestigious as other offerings from the period. Shortly after this, Marshall was no longer at MGM-- he was appearing in high-brow classics like THE ENCHANTED COTTAGE and THE RAZOR'S EDGE.

 

Did MGM not renew Marshall's contract or was he just loaded out for 3 - 4 years (I assume the former).   If MGM did end their contact with him, why cast an actor in a prestigious film when that actor isn't in the studio's future plans?    Instead cast him in a serial film and than cut him lose.   My guess is that if MGM studio bosses felt they were going to renew his contract they wouldn't of cast him in a Hardy film.   I also find most of the Hardy films enjoyable and entertaining but these type of serial films typically don't enhance the over market value of supporting players.  

 

Of course maybe MGM just felt Marshall's best days were way behind him since he was 53\54 when that Hardy movie was made.  But he did continue to make movies up until he was 75.

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Did MGM not renew Marshall's contract or was he just loaded out for 3 - 4 years (I assume the former).   If MGM did end their contact with him, why cast an actor in a prestigious film when that actor isn't in the studio's future plans?    Instead cast him in a serial film and than cut him lose.   My guess is that if MGM studio bosses felt they were going to renew his contract they wouldn't of cast him in a Hardy film.   I also find most of the Hardy films enjoyable and entertaining but these type of serial films typically don't enhance the over market value of supporting players.  

 

Of course maybe MGM just felt Marshall's best days were way behind him since he was 53\54 when that Hardy movie was made.  But he did continue to make movies up until he was 75.

Yes, and I don't know what the studio politics were like at MGM at that time, involving Marshall's contract. Mary Astor was also on contract with MGM and they were mostly using her for mother roles supporting the younger stars, or else lead roles in smaller budgeted programmers. Probably Marshall went to MGM because it was guaranteed income for a few years, and it was considered a high-class studio.  But if they were not using him in the kinds of films he was accustomed to making, he may have been the one who wanted outside assignments with David Selznick and Darryl Zanuck after this.  Though he did make a few more pictures at MGM in the 40s, notably HIGH WALL and THE SECRET GARDEN (and he's perfectly cast in that one).

 

It's a shame that MGM didn't use Marshall with Greer Garson in some of her melodramas. Doesn't it seem like he should be in MRS. MINIVER or THE MINIVER STORY, or in THAT FORSYTE WOMAN? I certainly think so. And it would have been very funny if he had been paired with Wallace Beery in a comedy-- can you imagine if they had been brothers separated at a young age, who turned out quite differently! 

 

Mayer probably didn't know how to use him (or appreciate his unique talents) as well as Selznick and Zanuck did. 

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i'm glad to see that both versions of The Letter (1940 and 1929) are still on the schedule for midnight and 1:45 AM edt. Marshall appears in both productions. in the 1940 film he's the wronged husband and in the 1929 flik he's the dead victim.

 

while the 1940 film is the better of the two, the 1929 version has the much acclaimed but troubled stage actress Jeanne Eagels giving a solid overall performance and she has a terrific final stunning scene. this was Eagels only talking picture to have survived and is worth a look (or a recording if it's too late to view.)

 

Marshall is quite good in both films.

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I updated the changes over on the TCM Programs forum. 

 

DUEL IN THE SUN has been dropped from Herbert Marshall's day (it will still air later in August for Joseph Cotten's tribute) and so has THE LADY CONSENTS (off the schedule entirely). In their place we now have the Crawford version of WHEN LADIES MEET, ANDY HARDY'S BLONDE TROUBLE and TROUBLE IN PARADISE.

 

The times have changed slightly for the other morning films. The primetime schedule for August 16 has not changed.

Oh boy, today's a 24 hour TCM day.

 

Doing what they do best, as they used to do, back when they showed movies like today's classically classic movies all the time.

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Oh boy, today's a 24 hour TCM day.

 

Doing what they do best, as they used to do, back when they showed movies like today's classically classic movies all the time.

WOW! Just about all the films were good, and how couldn't they be with Cary Grant in them, but Hot Saturday, new to TCM? Zowie. :o

 

A scene like no other scene I've ever seen in a b/w movie, pre-code or narrow-minded priggish Hays the idiot code movies, either one. And as RO said, quite an ending. And that '32 roadster with the chrome hood and the '31 Packard Dual Cowl Phaeton? H-o-o-c-h-i-e (speaking of narrow minded idiot censors) mama.

 

Wow.

 

Happily today is a dark set day.

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Well, that was a treat. New to me, Riptide was excellent from start to finish. Having Crawford follow Shearer just proves I'm right about Crawford.

 

Crime of it was, I missed the first 15 minutes and there was apparently an amazing costume party, with Walter Brennan as a chauffeur. Oh, and the gowns were gorgeous - Orry-Kelly? And the French 75 sounds divine. Wonder if they still make these today?

 

Was Montgomery that good out of the box? Never mind! I just looked him up on IMDb and he had 29 movies under his belt before Riptide. Wow. Too bad TCM doesn't show more of his early ones.

 

Poor Marshall, so good here and he had to participate in an Andy Hardy movie?

 

Looks like the next good one is Trouble in Paradise. Thank you, TCM. Would that your films were like this 365 days a year.

 

Oh well.

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