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Movies That Could Have Been Made Today


LonesomePolecat
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It's true that movies are mostly about The Human Condition which, of course, never changes. And although many movies still ring true today, and some don't at all, I'm wondering about the ones whose topics are so relevant you wonder if the filmmakers had a time machine and made them just for us.

 

For example, THE FORTUNE COOKIE:

A guy fakes an injury to win a lot of money in a lawsuit. Oh, and it's the lawyer's idea. Sounds familiar!

600full-the-fortune-cookie-screenshot.jp

 

In a more recent but still classic film (35 years old), you have a major custody battle between recent divorcees in KRAMER VS KRAMER:

03312009_kramervskramer2.jpg

 

Just two examples. How about y'all? Ever see a classic that could have been made today (in terms of topic of course--most of the actors are dead now :) )?

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I think Double Indemnity could be made today.  Man and woman scheme to kill woman's husband (while making it look like an accident) and run away together with the insurance money that they'll receive via the "double indemnity" clause in the insurance policy just recently purchased by the husband.

 

I also think The Lost Weekend could be made.  I would think the experiences that someone with a severe case of alcoholism would go through probably don't vary, no matter what decade it is.

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The Four Feathers -  today it may have end up on PBS.

 

Oh, you mean current story?   

 

The challenge is, so much of what drives plot are letters, notes, things that make reveals more problematic these days.   

 

Could you imagine The Letter being retold as The Text Message 

 

Meet John Doe actually could be a terrific update.  A number of men have taken to dropping out and permanent camping, and his popularity could be spread via social media.

 

I am on it.

 

 

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The challenge is, so much of what drives plot are letters, notes, things that make reveals more problematic these days.   

 

Could you imagine The Letter being retold as The Text Message 

 

 

 

Good point.

 

In THE RECKLESS MOMENT (a very good movie released in 1949 I discovered on TCM a couple of years ago), Joan Bennett plays a mother being blackmailed over letters her daughter had written to her (the daughter's) dead lover.  

In the equally good THE DEEP END (2001), adapted from the same novel as THE RECKLESS MOMENT, Tilda Swinton plays a mother being blackmailed over a video of her son having sex with his lover.

In both movies the mother mistakenly believes that her child has committed murder or manslaughter and a strange bond develops between the mother and the blackmailer. 

 

the-reckless-moment-shepperd-strudwick-j

bfi-00n-c8y.jpg?itok=R7NJz85V

tumblr_m526gu86JX1ql2w65o1_1280.jpg

THE RECKLESS MOMENT (1949)

 

deepend2.jpg

3696371_std.jpg

SwintonDeep%2BEnd.jpg

THE DEEP END (2001)

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I also think The Lost Weekend could be made.  I would think the experiences that someone with a severe case of alcoholism would go through probably don't vary, no matter what decade it is.

 

Speedy, I thought they pretty much did with this one, and in fact the guy who played the alcoholic in it won the Best Actor Oscar for his role and just like Ray Milland did for his portrayal of a guy with the similar affliction back in '45.

 

(...and of course I'm talkin' about Nicolas Cage in 1995's "Leaving Las Vegas")

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I think the 1940 Walt Disney film, "Fantasia", could be made today.  The computer programmers/ animators, would have a field day generating a three hour psychedelic type of film which still holds true to the original 1940 story of the best of western classical music, but add some jazz standards and some rock and roll music. The updated film could draw attention from demographics ranging from age 12 to 54.  

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It's true that movies are mostly about The Human Condition which, of course, never changes. And although many movies still ring true today, and some don't at all, I'm wondering about the ones whose topics are so relevant you wonder if the filmmakers had a time machine and made them just for us.

 

For example, THE FORTUNE COOKIE:

A guy fakes an injury to win a lot of money in a lawsuit. Oh, and it's the lawyer's idea. Sounds familiar!

600full-the-fortune-cookie-screenshot.jp

 

In a more recent but still classic film (35 years old), you have a major custody battle between recent divorcees in KRAMER VS KRAMER:

03312009_kramervskramer2.jpg

 

Just two examples. How about y'all? Ever see a classic that could have been made today (in terms of topic of course--most of the actors are dead now :) )?

 

Some are made today...it's called a remake.  :lol: 

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Could you imagine The Letter being retold as The Text Message ?

 

I love it!

 

Just think of how many thousands of pre-1995 screenplays would have been aborted if cell phones had been around. My wife and I got around to watching Jean Moreau's The Lovers this afternoon, and each of us noted that there's but one more movie whose plot would've been impossible today, given that Moreau would have nipped the entire second half of the movie in the bud by w h i p p i n g out her cell phone when her car broke down, and called to warn Maggy and Raoul not to get to her house before she did.  Her then-unrealized lover Bernard would've gone on his way, never to see her again, and her husband probably would have eventually killed everyone but Moreau's daughter in a fit of jealousy and rage, thus satisfying our local law enforcement officials' sense of decency and sparing that Ohio theater manager from the ignominy of arrest.  B)

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My wife and I got around to watching Jean Moreau's The Lovers this afternoon, and each of us noted that there's but one more movie whose plot would've been impossible today, given that Moreau would have nipped the entire second half of the movie in the bud by w h i p p i n g out her cell phone when her car broke down, and called to warn Maggy and Raoul not to get to her house before she did. 

 

Often the "no signal" complication is used in movies today. 

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Speedy, I thought they pretty much did with this one, and in fact the guy who played the alcoholic in it won the Best Actor Oscar for his role and just like Ray Milland did for his portrayal of a guy with the similar affliction back in '45.

 

(...and of course I'm talkin' about Nicolas Cage in 1995's "Leaving Las Vegas")

Watching the Wolf of Wall Street, you see how it starts.  

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Good point.

 

In THE RECKLESS MOMENT (a very good movie released in 1949 I discovered on TCM a couple of years ago), Joan Bennett plays a mother being blackmailed over letters her daughter had written to her (the daughter's) dead lover.  

In the equally good THE DEEP END (2001), adapted from the same novel as THE RECKLESS MOMENT, Tilda Swinton plays a mother being blackmailed over a video of her son having sex with his lover.

In both movies the mother mistakenly believes that her child has committed murder or manslaughter and a strange bond develops between the mother and the blackmailer. 

 

the-reckless-moment-shepperd-strudwick-j

bfi-00n-c8y.jpg?itok=R7NJz85V

tumblr_m526gu86JX1ql2w65o1_1280.jpg

THE RECKLESS MOMENT (1949)

 

deepend2.jpg

3696371_std.jpg

SwintonDeep%2BEnd.jpg

THE DEEP END (2001)

 

Yeah, talk about upping the ante. I swear to god, someone's going to turn this situation into a reality series--or have they already?   I don't watch them, so I wouldn't know.

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Well, a couple of you got what I meant, which was movies whose stories are incredibly relevant to the world we currently live in. Didn't mean to start a thread on remakes. (oops)

 

But the remake tangent brought on the interesting point that cell phones ruin a lot of classic film plots ("Romeo- playing dead, OMG! LOL! --Jules). CALL NORTHSIDE 777 is one where they have to wait hours and hours for a photo to be enlarged. Now you just pinch the screen and, bam, it's enlarged.

 

Inserting Ninja emoticon for no reason: :ph34r:

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I tried watching CHINATOWN last night (or whenever) and I found it to be very boring, with a lot of silly segments, such as Jack Nicholson going around without a gun, and all that daughter/sister nonsense at the end. That was just thrown in for sensationalism because the movie didn’t have a basic good story. Who cares about “crooks stealing water” or “crooks buying cheap real estate, using inside information”??

 

This was supposed to be a “new” film noir in the 1940s style, but it wasn’t.

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I tried watching CHINATOWN last night (or whenever) and I found it to be very boring, with a lot of silly segments, such as Jack Nicholson going around without a gun, and all that daughter/sister nonsense at the end. That was just thrown in for sensationalism because the movie didn’t have a basic good story. Who cares about “crooks stealing water” or “crooks buying cheap real estate, using inside information”??

 

This was supposed to be a “new” film noir in the 1940s style, but it wasn’t.

The whole "water theft" premise, I always found a bit lame. It was more than a mcguffin.

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The whole "water theft" premise, I always found a bit lame. It was more than a mcguffin.

 

Things like that go on all the time, in one way or another, in nearly every city, and sometimes there are murders or "mysterious accidents" involved.

 

Now, THE BIG SLEEP, that is a great story, even though it doesn't make much sense. I've been watching it over and over again for years. :)

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You must be very unaware of So Cal history as it relates to water espeically the Owen's Valley.    It clearly was NO mcguffin.

 

It wasn't back than and it isn't today.

 

Yes, people who have moved here (here meaning my neck of the woods) from southern California are vey conscious about what they see as our negligence with regard to water use.

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You must be very unaware of So Cal history as it relates to water especially the Owen's Valley.    It clearly was NO mcguffin.

 

It wasn't back than and it isn't today.

I am not unaware of it. I lived in LA for several years. Importance does not always translate into a fascinating screen topic. Splitting the atom was important. I don't recall filmmakers fighting each other to make a film about splitting the atom.

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I am not unaware of it. I lived in LA for several years. Importance does not always translate into a fascinating screen topic. Splitting the atom was important. I don't recall filmmakers fighting each other to make a film about splitting the atom.

 

Water is the most important element to life.    So to me it is a very fascinating screen topic.  

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Maybe someone can tell me why salt water from the Pacific Ocean was pumped all the way up hill to the Water Commissioner's garden, and then allowed to ruin the grass in such an obvious manner that the Asian gardener noticed it, and then allowed to flow back down to the Ocean??

 

And then why was some guy's body dumped in his own salt-water garden channel/pond, and then washed down to the Pacific Ocean? That seems like an odd way to get rid of a body.

 

I've lived in The Valley, and I found the film really stupid. I mean THE Valley, the same place the film was about.

 

I think DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS, a neo-noir about LA in the 1940s, was MUCH better.

 

This film was so good, I identified with Denzel Washington, and I felt like I was a black guy trying to keep from being murdered by white L.A. politicians, cops, crooks, etc. When a film can induce me into changing my race while I watch it, and boo all the white guys, it's usually a pretty good film.

 

And look at all these old cars. This is much better than Chinatown because the film looks like it was made in the 1940s. Chinatown does not.

 

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