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TomJH

Ever Like A Film So Much That You HATED That It Had To End?

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I've felt the same way about some books, too. As I was approaching the final chapters I would deliberately stop reading and put the book down, just so I had the pleasure of looking forward to reading some more. I didn't want to end the book too soon.

 

Well, it's been the same for me with some movies, too. And they don't necessarily even have to be great movies either. Possibly it's just due to the mood you're in, or some aspect of the film to which you are responding. You just don't want to see the film end.

 

Last might I stopped playing a DVD of a 1971 comedy, Skin Game, which I had never seen before. It's quite an amusing western comedy starring James Garner and Louis Gossett. Not a great one, by any stretch of the imagination, but it's always such a joy for me to watch Garner play subtle comedy on screen. And this film was made during the actor's prime, 1971, smack in between Support Your Local Sherrif and The Rockford Files.

 

Garner, though he still remained a pleasure to watch in later years, as well, is a joy to watch in this film, and has nice rapport with Gossett. But as I view the film I'm aware of the fact that this film is one of the last of my "discoveries" of Garner in his prime. I've largely seen everything else that he did during that time frame.

 

Maybe this doesn't make much sense but as I watch this film, as much as I enjoy watching Garner in it (and he's quite wonderful) I have a slight feeling of sadness, as well, that I have so little else to see of him for the first time during that period of his career. Therefore, with only about a half hour yet to view in Skin Game, I'm sorry that it has to end. I'll have no more prime Garner to discover for the first time.

 

At least, that is my rationalization for the fact that I'm sorry that this particular film has to end.

 

Anybody else feel the same way about some film or films, for whatever reason you may have?

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I like this original post and thread idea very much. It shows how we personalize these things. Have you seen Nichols, the western comedy series he made right before Rockford? It's great and he is in his prime.

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I like this original post and thread idea very much. It shows how we personalize these things. Have you seen Nichols, the western comedy series he made right before Rockford? It's great and he is in his prime.

No, I haven't seen Nichols yet and I did download it some months ago off You Tube. It will be the last of Garner's prime for me to see, and I look forward to it.

 

Still, I delay watching the end of Skin Game anyway.

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As I recall, the network (I forget which one) didn't give "Nichols"  much of a run to establish itself with an audience. That's odd considering how popular Jim Garner was at the time.   Other tv shows got off to slow starts (MASH and Cheers for example) but some network execs liked the shows, stuck with them for awhile and look what happened?

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As I recall, the network (I forget which one) didn't give "Nichols"  much of a run to establish itself with an audience. That's odd considering how popular Jim Garner was at the time.   Other tv shows got off to slow starts (MASH and Cheers for example) but some network execs liked the shows, stuck with them for awhile and look what happened?

Yes-- it lasted a full season, 24 episodes-- and in a twist unusual for its time when cancelled shows usually did not have endings, this one has a surprise ending. I won't spoil it for anyone. But it really is a very well made series and on a par with Jim's other shows.

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Books that I wished would continue on - Steinbeck's East of Eden and McMurtry's Lonesome Dove and Streets of Laredo.

 

But I didn't care about the East of Eden movie at all, nor the McMurtry-based movies.

 

One movie I remember wanting not to end was The Odd Couple (1968). I was enjoying it that much.

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I remember seeing a DeMille frontier epic, Unconquered, as a kid. It had a rugged buckskinned hero (Gary Cooper) continuously coming to the rescue of indentured servant Paulette Goddard in serial-like fashion. Among other things, the film had the hero and heroine in a canoe pursued by Indians, tumbling over a waterfalls and, of course, surviving, plus a fire arrow attack on Fort Pitt, a scene crammed with smoke and explosions. The film also featured Boris Karloff as a campy Indian chief, and I was blissfully unaware of the Indian racial stereotyping at the time.

 

The film ran two and a half hours, with commercials a full three hours on television, and when it ended I was disappointed that there wasn't more. Viewing it today, I can understand my attraction to it as a kid and still enjoy it to a considerable degree. It is a long film, however, and I cannot say that I am sorry now when it ends.

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Don't you think this is why they have started making series of movies and books?  I realize the market aspect of it but often we have such an emotional investment into a particular piece of literature or film that we don't want it to end.  I think producers have picked up on this and have started making series i.e. Harry Potter, Twilight, The Hunger Games.   I think it is interesting that producers didn't think of this before.  Or perhaps they did and misread the public.  I think of several films that could have easily been split into three or four different movies.  The Ten Commandments comes to mind.  Or Ben Hur.  Just a thought.

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Don't you think this is why they have started making series of movies and books?  I realize the market aspect of it but often we have such an emotional investment into a particular piece of literature or film that we don't want it to end.  I think producers have picked up on this and have started making series i.e. Harry Potter, Twilight, The Hunger Games.   I think it is interesting that producers didn't think of this before.  Or perhaps they did and misread the public.  I think of several films that could have easily been split into three or four different movies.  The Ten Commandments comes to mind.  Or Ben Hur.  Just a thought.

 

There have always been book and movie series.    I don't think there are more today than there was,  say, 60 years ago.

 

So producers did think of this before as well as authors.     

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Yes-- it lasted a full season, 24 episodes-- and in a twist unusual for its time when cancelled shows usually did not have endings, this one has a surprise ending. I won't spoil it for anyone. But it really is a very well made series and on a par with Jim's other shows.

Nichols gets knocked off. :D  It was on NBC's schedule for such a short period it seemed to me at the time like the series was almost imaginary. I really wanted to catch it as westerns were gettin' kinda sparse.

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