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Half-way through this year's SUTS-- favorite days so far...?

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MORE GREAT FILMS TODAY TOO !!!

 

I CAN'T GET ANY WORK DONE..... I'VE GOT TO WATCH ALL OF THESE !!!!

 

Fred :)

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I watched Sorry Wrong Number last night-- loved it! The ending was not what I was anticipating at all.  This was a fantastic film noir. 

 

 

I first saw this in a theater in 1948...... 66 years ago.

 

About all I remember is her on the telephone, and that frightening ending!!! Yikes!!!

 

The reason I can remember some films for so long is because I remembered some parts of the films all of my life. So, my memory all along the way keeps parts of the movies fresh in my mind for many decades. Stanwyck's screaming at the end was frightening. I think I didn't understand or remember most of the adult talking stuff in the film, which is most of the film, but her on the phone and then the ending was scary to a little kid like me!!!

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Always so nice to hear something like that. It's one of those movies that if you're lucky enough to not know the ending going into it, you remember the shock always, and that last line!

 

I would recommend skipping Clash by Night...forever. It's got a great cast (Stanwyck, Robert Ryan, Paul Douglas, Marilyn Monroe, and some smoking hot guy whose name I never remember, but he plays Marilyn's boyfriend.) It's by Clifford Odets- one of my least favorite writers of all time and it hopelessly talky, dull as dishwater and drearier than June in Frisco.

 

If you've got Netflix, see if you can order NO MAN OF HER OWN (1950) it was recently put on DVD and is one of Stanwyck's  least mentioned but best movies (I'm always trying to get people to see it.)

 

 

 

(you can even watch it online if you got a credit card and three bits to spend.)

I do have Netflix.  I'll make sure to add No Man of Her Own.  I'll still probably try to watch Clash By Night, it's been on my DVR for months.  I think I started watching it and then stopped... I don't really know why. 

 

Thanks for all the great Stanwyck noir recommendations!

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I first saw this in a theater in 1948...... 66 years ago.

 

About all I remember is her on the telephone, and that frightening ending!!! Yikes!!!

 

The reason I can remember some films for so long is because I remembered some parts of the films all of my life. So, my memory all along the way keeps parts of the movies fresh in my mind for many decades. Stanwyck's screaming at the end was frightening. I think I didn't understand or remember most of the adult talking stuff in the film, which is most of the film, but her on the phone and then the ending was scary to a little kid like me!!!

I agreed.  I was not anticipating that ending at all.  I love when films can do that.  Often times, when I've seen so many movies, with so many of the same type of storyline, it's easy to say "watch, at the end, this this and this will happen" and it's always slightly disappointing when I'm right, even if I enjoyed the build up to the eventual resolution.  I'm happy to say that what I thought would happen in Sorry Wrong Number did not happen at all.  I'm looking forward to adding this to my collection-- even if now I know the ending, I feel like there are some plot elements that I missed that would warrant a second or third (or more) glance.

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I'm happy to say that what I thought would happen in Sorry Wrong Number did not happen at all.  I'm looking forward to adding this to my collection-- even if now I know the ending, I feel like there are some plot elements that I missed that would warrant a second or third (or more) glance.

 

Although the basic plot of the film is fairly simple, the screenwriter and director did a good job of making the overall film rather complex with a lot of unusual and interesting sub-plots and flashbacks.

 

Back in the old days, when I was a kid in the late 1940s and all during the 50s, there would occasionally be a telephone switching error like the one shown in the movie, and we actually could hear other people talking when we picked up our telephones to dial a number. I suppose that was due to some problem in the old type of mechanical switching systems they used back in those days.

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  I'm happy to say that what I thought would happen in Sorry Wrong Number did not happen at all.  I'm looking forward to adding this to my collection-- even if now I know the ending, I feel like there are some plot elements that I missed that would warrant a second or third (or more) glance.

 

The weakness of Sorry, Wrong Number is that it is a half-hour premise (originally done on radio) stretched into ninety minutes, and some of the packing material is kind of evident (a lot of establishing shots; some long-lingering tracking shots of the house (which actually work just fine) and there's a long, lingering shot of a couple of professional dancers doing a tango when Wendell Corey takes Stanwyck's call in the restaurant. ) Stanwyck is pushed into the background before her BIG last act; it's a rare movie where she plays a lead and is the biggest star but isn't on screen for over 90% of the film.

 

It's a very good movie and I love it and own it on DVD, but, if you wanna listen to the original radio version starring Agnes Moorehead, it is on youtube for free in full- it's worth a listen, because you can imagine what a challenge it would be to turn this 26 minutes into a full length feature.

 

here tis:

 

 

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The weakness of Sorry, Wrong Number is that it is a half-hour premise (originally done on radio) stretched into ninety minutes

This is exactly why I don't like SORRY, WRONG NUMBER. The whole thing feels padded to me, like the flashbacks are used as filler just to draw it all out and reach the required length of a feature film. Another problem is the dialogue. It is obvious that they didn't rewrite it for the screen and relied heavily on the original text of the radio version.

 

Close your eyes and listen to it and it is like listening to a radio program. Some people like that, but I don't. I think dialogue should be sparse (unless it's a screwball comedy where we're supposed to have a series of rapidfire exchanges) and that especially in noir or a suspense drama, filmmakers should show whenever possible and not tell. Instead, this film is too talky and way too shrill. One contemplates what it would be like if it had been produced in the hands of someone like Alfred Hitchcock-- how it would be much more visually striking and what other dramatic possibilities (and ironic humor) might have been achieved with the story.

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I am enjoying Sophia Loren's tribute more than I thought I would. And I am looking forward to seeing ARABESQUE this evening-- it is certainly my favorite picture of hers.

 

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I am enjoying Sophia Loren's tribute more than I thought I would. And I am looking forward to seeing ARABESQUE this evening-- it is certainly my favorite picture of hers.

 

I'm glad that Two Women is being given the Prime Time slot that it richly deserves.  I only wish today's lineup featured more of her early Italian movies and fewer of her Hollywood films.

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The weakness of Sorry, Wrong Number is that it is a half-hour premise (originally done on radio) stretched into ninety minutes, and some of the packing material is kind of evident (a lot of establishing shots; some long-lingering tracking shots of the house (which actually work just fine) and there's a long, lingering shot of a couple of professional dancers doing a tango when Wendell Corey takes Stanwyck's call in the restaurant. ) Stanwyck is pushed into the background before her BIG last act; it's a rare movie where she plays a lead and is the biggest star but isn't on screen for over 90% of the film.

 

That type of thing bothers me about some films, but not this one.

 

I find this one very interesting and it doesn't seem padded to me.

 

The stuff about the bad-heart paranoia is interesting, the father buying her anything she wants (including a husband) is interesting, the theft and spies are interesting. Even that phone number of the morgue, is interesting, although quite odd.

 

So, to me, the whole film is just great, and that last few minutes is really outstanding and freaks me out every time, even after 66 years of seeing it!

 

:)

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Oh, PS: After about 63 years of seeing it, I finally figured something out..... all she had to do to get out of that house and not be alone was to call an ambulance and claim she was having a heart attack and they would have taken her to a hospital.

 

But, like me, I guess she was so frightened and paranoid, she didn't think of that.

 

:)

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There is something that bothers me about "The Killers".

 

Burt Lancaster knows they are coming to kill him, and he just waits for them. Not me!!! I would walk away from that place as fast as I could and catch the next bus to someplace where they would never find me.

 

:)

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There is something that bothers me about "The Killers".

 

Burt Lancaster knows they are coming to kill him, and he just waits for them. Not me!!! I would walk away from that place as fast as I could and catch the next bus to someplace where they would never find me.

 

:)

 

Well Fred,  the producers wouldn't have cast you in a noir.   You would take a logical action and than there wouldn't be any movie plot!

 

Of course when you go to that place where they will never find you,  make sure it isn't a gas station along the 395!   

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Well Fred,  the producers wouldn't have cast you in a noir.   You would take a logical action and than there wouldn't be any movie plot!

 

Of course when you go to that place where they will never find you,  make sure it isn't a gas station along the 395!   

 

Oh, yeah, and then there's Robert Mitchum in OUT OF THE PAST..... the same story.... he goes to work in a gas station in a small town in California, but it is on a main tourist route!  Doh.....

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There is something that bothers me about "The Killers".

 

Burt Lancaster knows they are coming to kill him, and he just waits for them. Not me!!! I would walk away from that place as fast as I could and catch the next bus to someplace where they would never find me.

 

:)

And I've said similar things about High Noon.  Cooper just waits around for the killers to come after him, and even walks around the town looking for them. If he didn't feel like running away, what he should have done was wait near the train station with a rifle and picked off every one of them. It's not like he would have been arrested. Code of the west be damned.

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Back in the old days, when I was a kid in the late 1940s and all during the 50s, there would occasionally be a telephone switching error like the one shown in the movie, and we actually could hear other people talking when we picked up our telephones to dial a number. I suppose that was due to some problem in the old type of mechanical switching systems they used back in those days.

Nowadays, when we pick up the phone, it's the NSA that hears us talking.

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And I've said similar things about High Noon.  Cooper just waits around for the killers to come after him, and even walks around the town looking for them. If he didn't feel like running away, what he should have done was wait near the train station with a rifle and picked off every one of them. It's not like he would have been arrested. Code of the west be damned.

 

Well the entire point of the movie was that Cooper was a man that lived by a certain code  (with a subtext being the lack of a code for the people in the town).   So it would have been completely out of character for the Cooper character in High Noon to do as you suggest.

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Well the entire point of the movie was that Cooper was a man that lived by a certain code  (with a subtext being the lack of a code for the people in the town).   So it would have been completely out of character for the Cooper character in High Noon to do as you suggest.

 

Wasn't "High Noon" really about standing up to McCarthyism and blacklisting in the 1950s? If so, there was no way the hero would cut and run.

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Wasn't "High Noon" really about standing up to McCarthyism and blacklisting in the 1950s? If so, there was no way the hero would cut and run.

 

If High Noon had really been about McCarthyism, Robert Ryan would've gotten the part of Will Kane. Gary Cooper would've refused it and denounced the movie as Commie propaganda.

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If High Noon had really been about McCarthyism, Robert Ryan would've gotten the part of Will Kane. Gary Cooper would've refused it and denounced the movie as Commie propaganda.

 

Perhaps Cooper liked the main storyline so much he didn't notice the political nuances. John Wayne certainly did and excoriated the film, although it was he who accepted the Best Actor Oscar for "High Noon" on Cooper's behalf.

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Perhaps Cooper liked the main storyline so much he didn't notice the political nuances. John Wayne certainly did and excoriated the film, although it was he who accepted the Best Actor Oscar for "High Noon" on Cooper's behalf.

 

I can see why the almost cartoonishly un-nuanced Wayne would have considered High Noon to be Commie propaganda, but that doesn't mean that the movie's "message"  had anything to do with smearing the names of innocent people for political gain, which is what "McCarthyism" represented in its essence.   "Fear" by itself was only a part of the package.

 

High Noon is a well made movie, but at bottom it's not all that different from a certain type of noir or pre-code drama whose plots centered on towns afraid to take on the local crime syndicate.  Are those films also to be considered some sort of a metaphor?

 

Now if you want a dramatic work that actually is a metaphor about McCarthyism, there's Arthur Miller's Broadway production of The Crucible, which made its debut a year after High Noon.  I can just imagine Gary Cooper embracing the message in that one! B)

 

 

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Before a House Committee or in private, under oath or merely Scout's Honor: if asked to list five of the most overrated films of the classic era, I would without hesitation (except to maybe say the '59 version of Ben Hur first) name High Noon.

 

it is about as pedestrian and unremarkable a film as they come.

 

The acting of the principles is not good. I know a lot of people here are iffy on Gary Cooper, I think he was a fine actor and a total movie star; but he looks about a breath away from death in this and seems to be sleepwalking throughout. I think Grace Kelly was a total movie star and a thoroughly boring actress and High Noon is people's Exhibit A in the case against her (and she has to be the most immaculately coiffed 19th century Quaker woman in the history of the world; she looks-  at all times- like she is about to nip off for lunch and some light shopping at I. Magnin); Katy Jurado takes the honors though- whereas Kelly and Cooper are a chore to tolerate, she is an utter delight to watch with her awesome, yet understated, badness- an inspiration for Chula drag queens through the ages.

 

The sets are dull and inauthentic; everything in this town of Back Lot looks way too clean; I wish someone would just tip the saloon over and start a Blazing Saddles-style game of facade dominoes.

 

The script has issues. SPOILER: that thing at the end about Kelly shooting the bad guy is HACK.

 

And there comes a point, oh, around forty minutes into it, where I really begin to resent the ongoing physical assault with Do Not Forsake Me (Oh, My Darlin') that the soundtrack refuses to let up on.

 

(And "Gonna be my life or his'n" is just lazy. )

 

ps- I like Lon Chaney Jr. though.

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Perhaps Cooper liked the main storyline so much he didn't notice the political nuances. John Wayne certainly did and excoriated the film, although it was he who accepted the Best Actor Oscar for "High Noon" on Cooper's behalf.

 

And there's further irony in this, because John Wayne gave a performance that year in The Quiet Man that blew Cooper's out of the water. Some would or could say it was Wayne that should've won that year....of course the fact that both were chummy with the HUAC just adds another layer of irony to the whole High Noon story.

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