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Half-way through this year's SUTS-- favorite days so far...?


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I'm really enjoying today's Betty Grable SUTS day. 

 

 

This has been a great day.

 

Betty Grable and Technicolor go together. My family used to see all of these we could back in the 1940s and early 50s. It didn't matter what the plot was. They were all great.

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This has been a great day.

 

Betty Grable and Technicolor go together. My family used to see all of these we could back in the 1940s and early 50s. It didn't matter what the plot was. They were all great.

 

Betty Grable day was great (she was a stone cold fox, wasn't she?), but I wish they hadn't felt beholden to fitting in the rerun of the episode of The Essentials that featured How to Marry A Millionaire because it is not a good movie and a terrible example of the work of Grable (the role is too small), Monroe (the role is terrible) and Bacall (she plays such a b****.) I never have any issues with William Holden, but ew!- David Wayne and double ew! Cameron Mitchell.

 

It is a non-Essential because anyone seeing Monroe or Grable or Bacall for the first time would think "what's the appeal?"

 

I Wake Up Screaming was a great premiere and even though I don't think it entirely "came off" in the end- it's a film that would be nice to see on a regular basis on TCM- thanks to whoever did the work to acquire that one.

 

One noticeable improvement about this years SUTS has been a decided move away from some of the "tried and true" titles we've seen trotted out for SUTS and Oscar month and SOTM features and Spotlights and etc. before- ie O'Brien day with DOA in prime time and no Barefoot Countessa (thank you!); or Lee Tracy day with no The Best Man.

 

Someone put some thought into what got scheduled this year and I appreciate it.

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Betty Grable day was great

 

The highlight of the Betty Grable day for me was OLD MAN RHYTHM. It wasn't Betty Grable, however, that was the draw.

Although perhaps it's not a great movie (I found it entertaining), it features Charles "Buddy" Rogers, the star of WINGS,and it offers a rare treat to see him in a "talking" movie. After his marriage to Mary Pickford, Rogers stopped working in front of the camera for the most part.

OLD MAN RHYTHM also features Johnny Mercer in his first (of two) appearances as an actor in a movie. After his two-picture contract with RKO ended, Mercer would go on to make a name for himself as one of the great Hollywood songwriters.   

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I Wake Up Screaming was a great premiere and even though I don't think it entirely "came off" in the end

 

 

My feelings about this film changed when I watched it last night. It is not as good as I remembered. It suffers from quite a few plot contrivances, and the main stars look a little uncomfortable in their roles (except for Cregar and Landis) and it sort of registers like a glorified B crime film. I think Grable was right when she told Zanuck that she was not cut out for straight dramatic parts and stuck to musicals henceforth. In a musical you can get by with mediocre acting if your dancing and singing is spectacular. But in a film of this nature, with nothing else to fall back on, you have to be very convincing-- and in some spots she was too self-conscious and not at all convincing. Mature did not exactly have a handle on his character either, but as his career at Fox continued, he would become a dependable dramatic lead. The remake with Crain and Peters is better in my opinion.

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:huh: Primos:   I didn't leave out Cry in the Night but got my titles mixed up.  In that first scene when he's looking at the couple from the bushes he looked so creepy I nearly went into shock then almost couldn't watch any more.  That's what inspired my post after seeing his roles grow get more perverse as the week went on. 

 

TopBilled:  Thank you fore the title; I looked everywhere for it.  In the 80s I was given a long gone box of old and bootlegged movies on VHS cassettes by a former SO and this was one.  I still prefer it to that other version of the story that cost 100 times more.  I'll try to find it on YouTube or Hulu.      

 

Our light went out during Mother Wore Tights and stayed out until just before eight.  I was really into that one and hope it gets run again soon so I can see the end.  While she was pretty in Down Argentine Way at 24 she seemed to really bloom as she neared 30.  I came away with a real respect for her as an all-around performer and understand why she was such a big star.  I wish she had let herself be developed into a dramatic actress-it might have worked-but it's nice to see someone comfortable in her own skin and niche that she was.

 

Almost everything you'd want to see Alan Ladd in is on today.  I taped The Man in the Net - because of one of his co-stars - and am waiting for The Deep Six.  I'll tape the overnighters and watch tomorrow between cooking.  What a way to end SUTS!  

 

P.S.  If you have GetTV there are two of his war movies on Friday evening, All the Young Men and The Paratrooper.   

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I think I watched at least half if not a little over half of Grable's SUTS day. 

 

I didn't mind the inclusion of How to Marry a Millionaire, I had already seen it multiple times, it wasn't anything new to me.  I don't hate it like others seem to and I just watched it because it was already on.  Saved me from having to look for something else to watch while I worked on some other tasks.  I really liked William Powell in his role, he brought his usual calm, collected demeanor and sophistication to the film.  While the men that the ladies ultimately ended up with were whatever (I would have chosen the forest ranger); I thought the married man that Grable went to Maine with was hilarious.  I love how angry he was about his life.  I'm glad that the film ultimately ended with them all marrying for love rather than for their original monetary goal, even if that resolution was predictable.  While I wouldn't call HTMAM one of my favorites, it's entertaining enough (at least to me) for what it is. 

 

I had already seen I Wake Up Screaming, which I enjoyed the first time, although I still do not understand the physical appeal of Victor Mature, he does not do anything for me; but I digress, I thought Laird Cregar and Carole Landis were excellent in their roles and I liked Betty's foray into film noir.  The twist ending was not as surprising this time around since I already knew it was coming; but it was nice seeing a premiere on TCM, even if it wasn't a premiere for me.

 

I watched a bunch of her musicals that I mentioned in my previous thread.  I really liked Down Argentine Way, that was fun.  Apparently the Don Ameche role was originally intended for Desi Arnaz, but he had to pull out of the film at the last minute.  The Nicholas Brothers were amazing.  I also liked Meet Me After the Show.  I also watched Coney Island which was pretty good.  Robert Montgomery's voice sounds almost exactly like Clark Gable's.  My husband noticed that in Betty's big production number at the end, that the number seemed under-rehearsed, as there were a couple dancers who very obviously messed up their steps.  I also thought it was interesting that in both Meet Me After the Show and Coney Island, that the opening credits were sung-- I hadn't seen (or heard, rather) that in a film before.

 

I had to run out and do errands in the middle of the afternoon, so I recorded Mother Wore Tights, which I'm watching right now-- so far, so good. William Frawley is in it!

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I watched a bunch of her musicals that I mentioned in my previous thread.  I really liked Down Argentine Way, that was fun.  Apparently the Don Ameche role was originally intended for Desi Arnaz, but he had to pull out of the film at the last minute.  The Nicholas Brothers were amazing.  I also liked Meet Me After the Show.  I also watched Coney Island which was pretty good.  Robert Montgomery's voice sounds almost exactly like Clark Gable's.  My husband noticed that in Betty's big production number at the end, that the number seemed under-rehearsed, as there were a couple dancers who very obviously messed up their steps.  I also thought it was interesting that in both Meet Me After the Show and Coney Island, that the opening credits were sung-- I hadn't seen (or heard, rather) that in a film before.

 

 

If it's any consolation, Desi did get to work with Betty Grable in an episode of The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour in the late 50s when she and husband Harry James guest-starred.  I think you meant George Montgomery, not Robert Montgomery, who costarred with Betty in CONEY ISLAND.

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If it's any consolation, Desi did get to work with Betty Grable in an episode of The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour in the late 50s when she and husband Harry James guest-starred.  I think you meant George Montgomery, not Robert Montgomery, who costarred with Betty in CONEY ISLAND.

I have seen the episode of The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour you mentioned.  I'm an I Love Lucy fanatic, I have the entire series on DVD.  Desi and Betty's episode is one of my favorite of the hour long episodes.  I believe Desi and Betty may have dated prior to his hooking up with Lucy as well.  Sorry, my mistake regarding Robert Montgomery.  I did mean George Montgomery.  His voice sounds exactly like Clark Gable's then.

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 I did mean George Montgomery.  His voice sounds exactly like Clark Gable's then.

I guess it does. I think James Craig (used by MGM as a Gable replacement during the war years) sounds like him, too.

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My feelings about this film changed when I watched it last night. It is not as good as I remembered. It suffers from quite a few plot contrivances, and the main stars look a little uncomfortable in their roles (except for Cregar and Landis) and it sort of registers like a glorified B crime film. I think Grable was right when she told Zanuck that she was not cut out for straight dramatic parts and stuck to musicals henceforth. In a musical you can get by with mediocre acting if your dancing and singing is spectacular. But in a film of this nature, with nothing else to fall back on, you have to be very convincing-- and in some spots she was too self-conscious and not at all convincing. Mature did not exactly have a handle on his character either, but as his career at Fox continued, he would become a dependable dramatic lead. The remake with Crain and Peters is better in my opinion.

 

I have seen both IWUS and the remake Vicki a lot in the last few months since MOVIES features both of these films.   I feel Grable and Mature do a better job than Crain and Elliot Reid.   I really liked how Grable played her part and found her to be convincing.    Since the film was made before WWII it does lack the darker, post WWII quality,  that Vicki has as a crime drama.

 

So I don't find one film better as a whole than the other.   Each has some things I like more and others I like less. 

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I have seen both IWUS and the remake Vicki a lot in the last few months since MOVIES features both of these films.   I feel Grable and Mature do a better job than Crain and Elliot Reid.   I really liked how Grable played her part and found her to be convincing.    Since the film was made before WWII it does lack the darker, post WWII quality,  that Vicki has as a crime drama.

 

So I don't find one film better as a whole than the other.   Each has some things I like more and others I like less. 

I'll buy that-- but I do think Crain is more effective than Grable in this sort of part. 

 

I WAKE UP SCREAMING seems to have a few similarities with FALLEN ANGEL. Again, we have Zanuck cutting a song in order to present a musical star (Alice Faye) as a serious dramatic actress. Of course, Faye who could be more than a bit temperamental, feuded with Zanuck about this and it abruptly curtailed her motion picture career. 

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I think I watched at least half if not a little over half of Grable's SUTS day.

 

I didn't mind the inclusion of How to Marry a Millionaire, I had already seen it multiple times, it wasn't anything new to me. I don't hate it like others seem to and I just watched it because it was already on. Saved me from having to look for something else to watch while I worked on some other tasks. I really liked William Powell in his role, he brought his usual calm, collected demeanor and sophistication to the film. While the men that the ladies ultimately ended up with were whatever (I would have chosen the forest ranger); I thought the married man that Grable went to Maine with was hilarious. I love how angry he was about his life. I'm glad that the film ultimately ended with them all marrying for love rather than for their original monetary goal, even if that resolution was predictable. While I wouldn't call HTMAM one of my favorites, it's entertaining enough (at least to me) for what it is.

 

I had already seen I Wake Up Screaming, which I enjoyed the first time, although I still do not understand the physical appeal of Victor Mature, he does not do anything for me; but I digress, I thought Laird Cregar and Carole Landis were excellent in their roles and I liked Betty's foray into film noir. The twist ending was not as surprising this time around since I already knew it was coming; but it was nice seeing a premiere on TCM, even if it wasn't a premiere for me.

 

I watched a bunch of her musicals that I mentioned in my previous thread. I really liked Down Argentine Way, that was fun. Apparently the Don Ameche role was originally intended for Desi Arnaz, but he had to pull out of the film at the last minute. The Nicholas Brothers were amazing. I also liked Meet Me After the Show. I also watched Coney Island which was pretty good. Robert Montgomery's voice sounds almost exactly like Clark Gable's. My husband noticed that in Betty's big production number at the end, that the number seemed under-rehearsed, as there were a couple dancers who very obviously messed up their steps. I also thought it was interesting that in both Meet Me After the Show and Coney Island, that the opening credits were sung-- I hadn't seen (or heard, rather) that in a film before.

 

I had to run out and do errands in the middle of the afternoon, so I recorded Mother Wore Tights, which I'm watching right now-- so far, so good. William Frawley is in it!

Just a little correction: that was George, not Robert,.Montgomery, whose voice sounded a lot like Clark Gable's.

 

In the dvd for I WAKE UP SCREAMING, they have a deleted scene, with Betty Grable singing along to a record while.at work. The song is called "Hot Spot", which was the working title of the film. The studio changed it, thinking that HS.would sound like a musical to Grable's fans; I guess the number was also removed to deemphasize Betty's fans' comfort zones.

 

MEET ME AFTER THE SHOW was the movie the studio tried to get Cary Grant as her costar. He was also keen to make a picture with her; I don't remember why it fell.through. The following year, in 1952, l think that Grable would have made.an ideal partner for Grant in MONKEY BUSINESS (in Ginger.Rogers' role, not Monroe's). But Grable, feuding with her studio over movie roles, was on suspension for a good deal of that year, so that didn't happen.

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Thank you, TCM, for a helluva month. You may now return to your regularly scheduled drek that isn't classically classic b/w 1930s and 1940s movies.

 

Oh, I see you have. Never mind. :D

Yes, I think the September 1st schedule shows that TCM is trying to be an 'Everything' or 'Every Decade' sort of channel-- we have a film from 2001, then shortly after a film from 1925. It seems extreme and doesn't exactly work.

 

Will there be a point (when none of us are no longer around) that TCM shows a film from 1899 alongside a film from 2089? They can't all be classics, can they...?

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tcm almost always does this kind of programming on holidays; therefore, i'll cut them some slack.      :lol:

 

Thank you, TCM, for a helluva month. You may now return to your regularly scheduled drek that isn't classically classic b/w 1930s and 1940s movies.

 

Oh, I see you have. Never mind. :D

 

Yes, I think the September 1st schedule shows that TCM is trying to be an 'Everything' or 'Every Decade' sort of channel-- we have a film from 2001, then shortly after a film from 1925. It seems extreme and doesn't exactly work.

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Yes, I think the September 1st schedule shows that TCM is trying to be an 'Everything' or 'Every Decade' sort of channel-- we have a film from 2001, then shortly after a film from 1925. It seems extreme and doesn't exactly work.

 

Will there be a point (when none of us are no longer around) that TCM shows a film from 1899 alongside a film from 2089? They can't all be classics, can they...?

 

Actually a schedule of movies from different eras on a given day is  what I love most about TCM.

And it works beautifully.

 

And, yes, a movie made any year could potentially be a classic . . . just as a movie from the 1930s or the 1940s is not necessarily a classic simply by virtue of the fact that it was made in the 1930s or 1940s.  

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Actually a schedule of movies from different eras on a given day is  what I love most about TCM.

And it works beautifully.

 

And, yes, a movie made any year could potentially be a classic . . . just as a movie from the 1930s or the 1940s is not necessarily a classic simply by virtue of the fact that it was made in the 1930s or 1940s.  

I think you missed the point of what I was saying. I didn't say a movie made in any year could not be a classic, but the likelihood that they are all classics is not realistic. And as you said, a movie from 1930- or 1940-whenever may not be a classic-- which implies that TCM airs some non-classics from those years/decades. 

 

In my opinion, it would be better if TCM stopped trying to run the gamut and began to focus clearly on a certain style or historical era of classic filmmaking-- but then, they would have to hunker down and give a meaningful definition of classic-- not just what is available to them in the Turner Library or what is easiest or cheapest to rent from outside companies.

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I think the idea of yesterday's slightly schizophrenic schedule was to showcase independently-made films as a tie-in to the Telluride Film Festivale...

 

I know The Most Dangerous Game has been done to death and it's a Public Domain film, but they showed a good print and it's always a good time killer; I also gave Something Wild with Carroll Baker a chance...but had to bail when it suddenly turned into The Collector (thanks for the glaringly inaccurate plot synopsis in the schedule whoever came up with it.) Death Rides a Horse was a bore.

 

I liked seeing Osborne during the day.

 

ps- I think the proper spelling is "dreck." If one is going to be critical, one should use proper spelling.

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I think you missed the point of what I was saying. I didn't say a movie made in any year could not be a classic, but the likelihood that they are all classics is not realistic. And as you said, a movie from 1930- or 1940-whenever may not be a classic-- which implies that TCM airs some non-classics from those years/decades. 

 

In my opinion, it would be better if TCM stopped trying to run the gamut and began to focus clearly on a certain style or historical era of classic filmmaking-- but then, they would have to hunker down and give a meaningful definition of classic-- not just what is available to them in the Turner Library or what is easiest or cheapest to rent from outside companies.

 

Well I think TCM does clearly focus on a specific historical era of filmmaking;  The Production Code era,  since the majority of movies TCM shows as measured on an annual basis are from that era.      TCM does 'run the gamut' as it relates to the movies they show NOT associated wtih the Production Code era,  but I like that since it leads to variety.

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I know The Most Dangerous Game has been done to death and it's a Public Domain film, but they showed a good print and it's always a good time killer; I also gave Something Wild with Carroll Baker a chance...but had to bail when it suddenly turned into The Collector (thanks for the glaringly inaccurate plot synopsis in the schedule whoever came up with it.) Death Rides a Horse was a bore.

 

I liked seeing Osborne during the day.

 

Once, a few years ago, they aired the Criterion restored print of THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME. I didn't record it then and have been regretting it ever since. SOMETHING WILD was shown in full screen when it should have been in widescreen. 

 

I didn't feel like Osborne's commentary was needed on Labor Day. The programming did not exactly relate to the holiday.

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Who misspelled dreck? It wasn't me.  

 

I think we know what primosprimos meant...

 

TB, why are you responding to this as if someone has accused you of misspelling the word?

You were not referenced in LHF's spelling correction post or in my comment on it.

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