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SKYLARK [1941]


cody1949
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  I had never seen this movie . It was hidden, until tonight , in the Universal vault. Made by Paramount in 1941. It is a thoroughly delightful comedy played to perfection by an impeccable cast of Claudette Colbert, Ray Milland, Brian Aherne and Walter Abel. Anybody else out there have the same opinion ?

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  I had never seen this movie . It was hidden, until tonight , in the Universal vault. Made by Paramount in 1941. It is a thoroughly delightful comedy played to perfection by an impeccable cast of Claudette Colbert, Ray Milland, Brian Aherne and Walter Abel. Anybody else out there have the same opinion ?

Sorry, no. I found it so facile, unfunny, and predictable that I turned it off before the ending where OF COURSE she goes back to Ray Milland, right?

 

RO was better off showing No Time For Love.

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I enjoyed it, mainly because of the charm of the lead actors, although I thought the story was a bit of a mess. It reminded me of THE PALM BEACH STORY but with less wit, sophistication or sense of fun. Like the other film, you have Claudette Colbert literally running away from a husband who at least momentarily tries to manhandle her into staying. I didn't find Colbert's character very consistent - Brian Aherne seems to do everything right in his efforts to steal her away for 90 per cent of the movie, but because the sanctity of marriage must be restored by film's end (probably because of the Production Code), he takes her out on his boat in a storm, and after a minute or two of being tossed around, she's weeping like a baby for Ray Milland.

 

I did like that Milland's character "grew up" over the course of the movie, evolving from a rather emasculated ad man, forced to endure humiliations like giving away his own chef to make his boss happy, to taking own important work in the rather vague field of "hemispheric defense", but by gosh, he's a real man now, worthy of returning to.

 

I liked the scene where Milland pretended to be unconscious and was so pleased with how his plan was working out, he smiled a big goofy, contented grin while Aherne was carrying him, which of course gave his deception away. Ha ha. And the actor who played Milland's friend was hilarious in every scene in which he appeared.

 

By the way, how much do advertising people make that Milland and Colbert had their own chef and butler?

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By the way, how much do advertising people make that Milland and Colbert had their own chef and butler?

Well, Cary Grant was an ad man in MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE. And he and Myrna Loy had a maid (played by Louise Beavers). Only in the movies, right?

 

By the way, SKYLARK is coming up again on September 14th for those who missed it last night.

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I enjoyed it, mainly because of the charm of the lead actors, although I thought the story was a bit of a mess. It reminded me of THE PALM BEACH STORY but with less wit, sophistication or sense of fun. Like the other film, you have Claudette Colbert literally running away from a husband who at least momentarily tries to manhandle her into staying. I didn't find Colbert's character very consistent - Brian Aherne seems to do everything right in his efforts to steal her away for 90 per cent of the movie, but because the sanctity of marriage must be restored by film's end (probably because of the Production Code), he takes her out on his boat in a storm, and after a minute or two of being tossed around, she's weeping like a baby for Ray Milland.

 

I did like that Milland's character "grew up" over the course of the movie, evolving from a rather emasculated ad man, forced to endure humiliations like giving away his own chef to make his boss happy, to taking own important work in the rather vague field of "hemispheric defense", but by gosh, he's a real man now, worthy of returning to.

 

I liked the scene where Milland pretended to be unconscious and was so pleased with how his plan was working out, he smiled a big goofy, contented grin while Aherne was carrying him, which of course gave his deception away. Ha ha. And the actor who played Milland's friend was hilarious in every scene in which he appeared.

 

By the way, how much do advertising people make that Milland and Colbert had their own chef and butler?

but because the sanctity of marriage must be restored by film's end (probably because of the Production Code),

 

Exactly. Nothing like a good marriage with an abusive man. Aherne should have told Colbert that leopards don't change their spots.

 

Oh well. At least Milland wasn't a consistent on-screen misogynist like some other actors.

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Sorry, no. I found it so facile, unfunny, and predictable that I turned it off before the ending where OF COURSE she goes back to Ray Milland, right?

 

RO was better off showing No Time For Love.

 

Same here.   I just couldn't stand the husband role as written and Colbert's wife role was only slightly better.    Yea,  this is a comedy but one I didn't find funny.    Reading above I guess the husband grows up and figures out using threats isn't a way to a women's heart.     Oh,  boy!   To be fair to the filmmakers this type of plot was fairly common during that era but that doesn't mean I have to watch the film.   

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By the way, how much do advertising people make that Milland and Colbert had their own chef and butler?

 

 

Well, Cary Grant was an ad man in MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE. And he and Myrna Loy had a maid (played by Louise Beavers). Only in the movies, right?

 

By the way, SKYLARK is coming up again on September 14th for those who missed it last night.

 

Having watched one of my favorite comedies again during the Cary Grant SUTS day the other day, I recall it being mentioned in "Mr. Blandings" that his yearly salary as an ad man was $16,000, and which according to an online inflation calculator comes to about $158,000 in 2014 dollars.

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I’m a big fan of Ray Milland; I’ve always thought he must have had a good sense of humor to match his ear-to-ear smile. I enjoyed seeing Milland with Claudette Colbert in The Gilded Lily and Arise, My Love; in  both films he is a charming and likeable love interest, and his last minute shift in character in the first film convenient so Claudette can walk in to the sunset with Fred MacMurray. Skylark has been on my list of films to see for some time, but I can’t say my patience was greatly rewarded. The three leads seem more than a little “flummoxed” as to how they should bring “screwball comedy” elements to a somewhat tired story.

 

I’m sure most actors and actresses enjoy roles with a bit of a challenge, but Ray Milland was thoroughly unlikable throughout most of the film. I was most baffled by the scene on the subway: the women convinced Claudette’s character is a spoiled woman who isn’t grateful for what her husband gives her (did one recommend corporal punishment as a solution?), while the men take the opposite view that she is entitled to have a life of her own . . . interesting, and yet?  Walter Able, Binnie Barnes and Butch the dog saved the film for me, and kept me from abandoning it a time or three (I would have liked to have seen Vivian Vance in the role of the viperous Myrtle Vantine).

 

I was wondering if anyone, with musical knowledge, recognized the alternate music used in the film. I know one of the themes was the lovely Isn’t It Romantic by Rodgers and Hart. I expected the music of Skylark by Hoagy Carmichael and Johnny Mercer to be featured, given the title and the fact the song was popular at the time. I don't believe the second theme was Skylark, but I'm hoping someone can help me identify the alternate music. Thanks

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Having watched one of my favorite comedies again during the Cary Grant SUTS day the other day, I recall it being mentioned in "Mr. Blandings" that his yearly salary as an ad man was $16,000, and which according to an online inflation calculator comes to about $158,000 in 2014 dollars.

 

If the maid lived in the house and therefore was getting room and board,  I assume her monthly salary would have been less than $50.    

 

That isn't even $600 a year from his yearly salary.

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Well, Cary Grant was an ad man in MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE. And he and Myrna Loy had a maid (played by Louise Beavers). Only in the movies, right?

 

By the way, SKYLARK is coming up again on September 14th for those who missed it last night.

     If your cable provider is Comcast, SKYLARK should be on On Demand for the next few days.

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I looked forward to this movie and then fell asleep after about 20 minutes.  I didn't like Milland from the get-go.  Sounds like I didn't miss anything.  Then, I woke up for Three Came Home and couldn't turn it off -- an outstanding film, with a great performance by Colbert and a very nuanced portrait of the Japanese Colonel, played by Sessue Hayakawa.

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I did like this movie but hated the Milland character. He acted like such a twerp the way he acted towards Colbert. She was right to leave him and was hoping he would not win her back. Binnie Barnes seems to have played a different variation of her character in SKYLARK in several movies. I did think the movie would use the SKYLARK theme as the main title. But it did not.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I caught this yesterday on its repeat showing. (Although I sent myself a reminder it was on, I forgot! Luckily I had TCM on at the time when it came on).

 

I thought it was ok. Not up to other Claudette C. comedies (but not really her fault)

 

Most interesting was Mank's gaffe in the intro. Saying the clothes were designed for Colbert in the film by EDITH HEAD who was Claudette's favorite designer. That may be so, but they were designed by IRENE (which makes me wonder if Edith was her favorite designer as Irene designed many of Colbert's films too)...........

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Same here.   I just couldn't stand the husband role as written and Colbert's wife role was only slightly better.    Yea,  this is a comedy but one I didn't find funny.    Reading above I guess the husband grows up and figures out using threats isn't a way to a women's heart.     Oh,  boy!   To be fair to the filmmakers this type of plot was fairly common during that era but that doesn't mean I have to watch the film.   

To be fair to the filmmakers this type of plot was fairly common during that era but that doesn't mean I have to watch the film.

 

Spot on, james. Been there, lived it growing up. No thank you.

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