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Reflections in a Golden Eye (color version)


dogbyte420
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I read on the wiki page for the movie that not only does a full color version exist, but also maybe a version that is made with one object in each scene in standard color in contrast to the golden hue.

 

The only version I can find is the golden one. Is anyone else as interested in finding the other versions as I am? Especially the version with one particular color item in each scene.

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I read on the wiki page for the movie that not only does a full color version exist, but also maybe a version that is made with one object in each scene in standard color in contrast to the golden hue.

The only version I can find is the golden one. Is anyone else as interested in finding the other versions as I am? Especially the version with one particular color item in each scene.

I would most be interested in the full color version. Maybe a blu-ray release can have the standard washed out release, the full color version, even the third version u mentioned.

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While Brando was quite a dispirited actor in the 60's, that was a movie he cared about - and it shows. Probably his finest acting between 'The Fugitive Kind' and 'The Godfather'.

 

I agree.

Brando speaks with a very specific Southern accent in REFLECTIONS IN A GOLDEN EYE.

After hearing Tennessee Williams in interviews, I believe that Brando was using Williams's speech pattern as his model for the character in REFLECTIONS IN A GOLDEN EYE.

Brandon reportedly used Rocky Graziano as his model for Stanley Kowalski in A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE. 

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This might be one crazy movie but the book is a lot more bizarre

 

I've read McCuller's novel. The movie is a pretty solid adaptation, in my opinion.

 

But, it really all hinges on Brando's exquisite performance. I can't imagine this movie being nearly as good with any other actor playing the role of Major Penderton.

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I read on the wiki page for the movie that not only does a full color version exist, but also maybe a version that is made with one object in each scene in standard color in contrast to the golden hue.

 

The only version I can find is the golden one. Is anyone else as interested in finding the other versions as I am? Especially the version with one particular color item in each scene.

 

I read an American Cinematographer article about it shortly after the film was first released.

 

It said that one version was in normal full color, but a second version was in an experimental "desaturated" color, except fo red objects. "desaturated" essentially means something like "black and white". It was NOT gold colored. It was pretty much black and white except for the color red.

 

The gold version is a modern 3rd version that we see on TCM.

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I read an American Cinematographer article about it shortly after the film was first released.

 

It said that one version was in normal full color, but a second version was in an experimental "desaturated" color, except fo red objects. "desaturated" essentially means something like "black and white". It was NOT gold colored. It was pretty much black and white except for the color red.

 

The gold version is a modern 3rd version that we see on TCM.

My understanding is that.the gold.version was the original release, as John Huston had wanted.it. I think the studio later had the full color version in general release, hoping the film.would at least make back it's expenses.

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My understanding is that.the gold.version was the original release, as John Huston had wanted.it. I think the studio later had the full color version in general release, hoping the film.would at least make back it's expenses.

 

I don't remember the article saying the desaturated copy was "gold". I recall saying it resembled black and white with very weak colors except for bright red.

 

I also think this version was released first, but not accepted by audiences, so the full color version was released for general release, and that is what most people saw. But it doesn't seem to be available now.

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I read an American Cinematographer article about it shortly after the film was first released.

 

It said that one version was in normal full color, but a second version was in an experimental "desaturated" color, except fo red objects. "desaturated" essentially means something like "black and white". It was NOT gold colored. It was pretty much black and white except for the color red.

 

The gold version is a modern 3rd version that we see on TCM.

My understanding is that.the gold.version was the original release, as John Huston had wanted.it. I think the studio later had the full color version in general release, hoping the film.would at least make back it's expenses.

I don't remember the article saying the desaturated copy was "gold". I recall saying it resembled black and white with very weak colors except for bright red.

 

I also think this version was released first, but not accepted by audiences, so the full color version was released for general release, and that is what most people saw. But it doesn't seem to be available now.

Well, I only called it "gold" because that is how it has been referred as here. In my first post, I called it washed out, the same as your ,,,desaturated, which was the original release. That is also the version TCM shows.

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Well, I only called it "gold" because that is how it has been referred as here. In my first post, I called it washed out, the same as your ,,,desaturated, which was the original release. That is also the version TCM shows.

 

I never saw the original desaturated version, and I'm trying to remember an article I read about 45 years ago. :)

 

"Desaturated" meant ALL the colors were washed out, including yellow and gold. The article said the ONLY color visible as a strong solid color was red. I remember the article fairly well, since I was a documentary film cameraman at the time and I thought the "desatuated" idea, with red only being visible as a strong primary color, was a silly idea. I don't recall any mention of the film being bright yellow or gold.

 

TCM's gold version is NOT "desaturated", it is gold toned, probably with a gold filter during printing, or more likely now, toned gold during electronic dubbing from film to electronic video.

 

"Desaturated" would be like when you turn your TV's "color" adjustment almost all the way off. That is "desaturated". And that was difficult to do with film only and no electronics involved. Also, it was difficult to keep red only and desaturate everything else, without the entire film looking redish or pink. The article said they had to a lot of lab, printing, and filter manipulation to get the desaturated (nearly colorless) effect, yet while retaining bright reds.

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