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I thought it was funny...


Sepiatone
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I meant to post this yesterday, but got distracted..

 

My newspaper, The Detroit Free Press carries a comic strip called "Grand Avenue" by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson.  It seems the premis is the adventures of two young children being raised by their Grandmother.  I'm not sure why that is...

 

Anyway, in yesterday's strip, the kids discover their Grandmother watching TV and crying.  When asked WHY she's crying, the Grandmother informs them she's watching an old movie called "Casablanca" and the ending is so sad she can't help but cry whenever she sees it.

 

One kid walks away thinking it's a silly thing to cry about.  The other kid admits:

 

"I'd cry TOO if I had to watch a black and white movie!" 

 

I chuckled because it sounds like what a lot of kids in MY family would say, but we also covered this sort of thing in here, too.

 

Sepiatone

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it's rather sad in a way. I love black-and-white films and hope that they continue on for decades to come.

 

Do you mean that you hope there will continue to be stations like TCM that continue to show B&W films or that producers will continue to make B&W films?    e.g. The Artist.

 

Anyhow,  I'm hoping for both!     

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Today's youth wouldn't even think about this, but when I was 10 (in 1983) I had a 12-inch black-and-white Tv set in my room.  I think it was a Hitachi.  Nowadays you probably couldn't even give away a B&W television set.  You'd get laughed out of a pawn shop if you brought one in seeking $dough$. 

 

    

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I introduced my sons back when they were about 8 and 10 to the Hope/Crosby "Road" films and they fell in love with them. Then came Abbott and Costello, The Thin Man series. They also became fans of old radio shows like Jack Benny. Bob Hope.Chris my oldest { he's 35 and Sean is 33}  has most of the Abbott/ Costello films on DVD. About 4 or 5 years ago, his son Kyle discovered the duo and became a big fan . He's seen all the "Road" films and loves them. he was introduced to Laurel and Hardy and last month on his 13th birthday I gave him the "Francis, The Talking Mule" series. He has watched 4 of the 7. He starts throwing lines at me from some of the A/C bits...I ask "Did you go to school stupid" and he answers "Yes, and I came home the same way. We're thinking about taking the act on the road. I feel good when we sit down to watch an old black and white film and know they are having a good time.

 

When Chris was about 13 his teacher was showing a film in class, "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" and when Jack Benny appeared on scene the teacher said "I will give anyone a passing grade for this period if they can name that comic. Chris said he looked around and no one raised a hand so he raised his and said "Jack Benny", the teacher was surprised, but he got  a passing grade. My job here is done.......

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I introduced my sons back when they were about 8 and 10 to the Hope/Crosby "Road" films and they fell in love with them. Then came Abbott and Costello, The Thin Man series. They also became fans of old radio shows like Jack Benny. Bob Hope.Chris my oldest { he's 35 and Sean is 33}  has most of the Abbott/ Costello films on DVD. About 4 or 5 years ago, his son Kyle discovered the duo and became a big fan . He's seen all the "Road" films and loves them. he was introduced to Laurel and Hardy and last month on his 13th birthday I gave him the "Francis, The Talking Mule" series. He has watched 4 of the 7. He starts throwing lines at me from some of the A/C bits...I ask "Did you go to school stupid" and he answers "Yes, and I came home the same way. We're thinking about taking the act on the road. I feel good when we sit down to watch an old black and white film and know they are having a good time.

 

When Chris was about 13 his teacher was showing a film in class, "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" and when Jack Benny appeared on scene the teacher said "I will give anyone a passing grade for this period if they can name that comic. Chris said he looked around and no one raised a hand so he raised his and said "Jack Benny", the teacher was surprised, but he got  a passing grade. My job here is done.......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wV3URABen5g :)

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I meant to post this yesterday, but got distracted..

 

My newspaper, The Detroit Free Press carries a comic strip called "Grand Avenue" by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson.  It seems the premis is the adventures of two young children being raised by their Grandmother.  I'm not sure why that is...

 

Anyway, in yesterday's strip, the kids discover their Grandmother watching TV and crying.  When asked WHY she's crying, the Grandmother informs them she's watching an old movie called "Casablanca" and the ending is so sad she can't help but cry whenever she sees it.

 

One kid walks away thinking it's a silly thing to cry about.  The other kid admits:

 

"I'd cry TOO if I had to watch a black and white movie!" 

 

I chuckled because it sounds like what a lot of kids in MY family would say, but we also covered this sort of thing in here, too.

 

Sepiatone

 

Guess we can count those (today's typical) kids out of being future TCM fans. A silent film might bring on hysterics. tantrum.gif

 

Regarding modern stupid films that kids love, seeing a gun toting raccoon makes me cry.

 

Rocket-Raccoon-Design-Charlie-Wen-Guardi

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Those who read here regularly know, my step daughter is a complete convert to "old" movies. She'll be 17 next month.

Like fredB's kids, she was just exposed to them via her parents and now accepts them as "arty". Even silents. Chaplin is one of her favorites.

 

I think b&w is just a barrier that at first seems odd to kids, but once they themselves mature and start seeing movies as "art" or just stories, or historical artifacts, they accept them. I do think it was great so many Woody Allen films were made b&w.

 

Re: gun toting raccoon- I think someday b&w films will be so different from modern films, they will be referred to as "stories" since new action films HAVE no story.

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My kids grew up on new and old films.  My son's favorite classic is HELLZAPOPPIN'.   My daughter's favorite is THE TEN COMMANDMENTS.  They both love classic comedy.  My daughter had a friend over one day and we ran a beautiful print of DRACULA'S DAUGHTER.  The friend was amazed at what a really good, creepy film it was.  I remember she said "It was amazing. It had like - a story!  It wasn't just a lot of blood and stuff!"

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Speaking of black-and-white movies I've seen a B&W film made in 1999 called 'THE WOMAN CHASER' starring Patrick Warburton.  The video version was in B&W.  Apparently there was a cable version of the movie shown in color, but I've never seen it.  The movie takes place in late '50s Los Angeles.  Warburton is a used car dealer with dreams of making it big in the film industry.  To this end he enlists the aid of his stepfather.  Some of y'all might like it.  Rated [R], btw.  I enjoyed it enough to have watched it twice so far.

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Today's youth wouldn't even think about this, but when I was 10 (in 1983) I had a 12-inch black-and-white Tv set in my room.  I think it was a Hitachi.  Nowadays you probably couldn't even give away a B&W television set.  You'd get laughed out of a pawn shop if you brought one in seeking $dough$.

 

Not necessarily, Mr Gorman. Not if you brought in this one or this one.

 

mUPIivyZa9jMREWza7hYDBw.jpgmxyI7pnUPdM-30HEsjLmIvA.jpg

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Billy Wilder was the last major director to stick with black and white films. Up through at least THE FORTUNE COOKIE (1966), all his films were black and white except for THE EMPEROR WALTZ.

 

Do you know why Wilder favored B&W over color?   Of course for certain genres B&W can be more effective then color,  but I don't see how that applies to a movie like The Fortune Cookie.   (it has been a while since I've seen the picture so many there are uses of lighting and shading in the film that one can only get with B&W film).

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aren't any rated g movies made anymore?         :(

 

Guess we can count those (today's typical) kids out of being future TCM fans. A silent film might bring on hysterics. tantrum.gif

 

Regarding modern stupid films that kids love, seeing a gun toting raccoon makes me cry.

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Do you know why Wilder favored B&W over color?   Of course for certain genres B&W can be more effective then color,  but I don't see how that applies to a movie like The Fortune Cookie.   (it has been a while since I've seen the picture so many there are uses of lighting and shading in the film that one can only get with B&W film).

I believe that he thought that his generally cynical screenplays worked better in black and white. THE EMPEROR WALTZ may have also been, critically, his least successful film. The critics didn't initially like ACE IN THE HOLE, but Wilder himself loved it, and the critics eventually came around.

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Those who read here regularly know, my step daughter is a complete convert to "old" movies. She'll be 17 next month.

Like fredB's kids, she was just exposed to them via her parents and now accepts them as "arty". Even silents. Chaplin is one of her favorites.

 

I think b&w is just a barrier that at first seems odd to kids, but once they themselves mature and start seeing movies as "art" or just stories, or historical artifacts, they accept them. I do think it was great so many Woody Allen films were made b&w.

 

Re: gun toting raccoon- I think someday b&w films will be so different from modern films, they will be referred to as "stories" since new action films HAVE no story.

I've always watched b&w movies.  I used to watch Laurel & Hardy, The Three Stooges and The Marx Brothers films regularly on AMC, back when they showed old films.  I never really thought anything different about them, only that they were in black and white.  In the about 1995ish, when I was 11, I discovered Nick at Nite and started watching it every evening on a small, black and white TV.  I didn't think anything of it, most of the shows I was watching were b&w anyway; but even watching a color show in b&w wasn't a big deal.  I may have just been a weird kid (in comparison to my peers) though.  I prefer to think of myself as just ahead of the times, since it seems that lately there's an interest in vintage among younger crowds.

 

Re: gun toting raccoon, I saw Guardians of the Galaxy, and it was really good.  It was fun and had great music. 

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Billy Wilder was the last major director to stick with black and white films. Up through at least THE FORTUNE COOKIE (1966), all his films were black and white except for THE EMPEROR WALTZ.

 

The Seven Year Itch, The Spirit Of St. Louis, and Irma La Douce were all in color.

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I grew up with black & white in numerous forms (born in mid 80s.) When we were kids we watched Nick At Nite back when it showed only old 50s and 60s TV shows. We had Our Gang/Little Rascals and the Three Stooges on video. My generation made Cartoon Network, which showed black & white cartoons in specific blocks in the days when it was a top five cable channel.

 

I never had a problem with black & white at any age. If I refused to watch something like Casablanca when I was 8, it was because it was kissy romantic stuff, not because it was monochrome. Of course, I would come around to "kissy romantic" stuff when I got older.

 

I don't understand how anyone from my generation can't be acclimated to the stuff - it was all over the place!

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I've always watched b&w movies.  I used to watch Laurel & Hardy, The Three Stooges and The Marx Brothers films regularly on AMC, back when they showed old films.  I never really thought anything different about them, only that they were in black and white.  In the about 1995ish, when I was 11, I discovered Nick at Nite and started watching it every evening on a small, black and white TV.  I didn't think anything of it, most of the shows I was watching were b&w anyway; but even watching a color show in b&w wasn't a big deal.  I may have just been a weird kid (in comparison to my peers) though.  I prefer to think of myself as just ahead of the times, since it seems that lately there's an interest in vintage among younger crowds.

 

Re: gun toting raccoon, I saw Guardians of the Galaxy, and it was really good.  It was fun and had great music. 

You are ahead of the crowd, speedracer, I thought you were older! That is a compliment...........

 

I was born to black and white, Howdy Doody, Winky Dink, Ding Dong School, Peer Gynt shadow cartoons, the works. Hence my wish for an all b/w TCM all the time. The Late Late Show, Million Dollar Movie, and then b/w films on PBS. Rodan was the first movie I saw in a theater, and it wasn't a retrospective.

 

Then I got cable on my beloved CRT television which is probably still working somewhere.

 

AMC was wonderful and did things right, back in the day - OLD films, all day, Bob Dorian and Nick Clooney as host. Then they shunted the b/w movies to the wee hours of the morning - hence began my taping, all gone now - fired the old guys, and brought in an 'actor' (at least TCM has RO and Manky - didja see that tan suit with the lavender appointments? very sharp) who now sells adult diapers on GetTV.

 

Ahhhhhh, and then there was TCM 20 years ago - glorious, in the beginning. Now............well, you know. Very good, but not glorious.

 

Ah well, nostalgia and a dollar won't get me on the subway.

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I grew up in B&W and thought "Technicolor" was ultra-special, but I grew out of it.  Now I don't care one way or the other, since all that matter to me are the story and the acting.  The skill with which an actor conveys a particular point of emotion along the spectrum is worth a thousand subtle gradations of color, and the degree to which the story is compelling is worth all the special effects in the world.  If I had to name my 100 favorite films, I couldn't even begin to estimate how many were in color or B&W without first making up the list.

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The Seven Year Itch, The Spirit Of St. Louis, and Irma La Douce were all in color.

You are correct. Wilder would have preferred to do THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH in Black and White, but at that time, Monroe's contract called for all her films to be in color. SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS was atypical subject matter for Wilder, and I assume IRMA LA DOUCE was done in color to capture the Parisian colors.

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As a photographer I can appreciate well done Black&White photography.  Of course, it doesn't need be pristine if the STORY benefits by a cruder method, like CALLING NORTHSIDE 777.  But I did like John Ford's excellent use of the yellow filter in many of his Black and White westerns...Bogdonovich borrowed this method of well used Yellow filtering in THE LAST PICTURE SHOW and PAPER MOON.  Now, it's all done by computer, and most times you'll see B&W in modern film makeing is in offerings like the coming soon "SIN CITY" sequel.

 

Sepiatone

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You are ahead of the crowd, speedracer, I thought you were older! That is a compliment...........

 

I was born to black and white, Howdy Doody, Winky Dink, Ding Dong School, Peer Gynt shadow cartoons, the works. Hence my wish for an all b/w TCM all the time. The Late Late Show, Million Dollar Movie, and then b/w films on PBS. Rodan was the first movie I saw in a theater, and it wasn't a retrospective.

 

Then I got cable on my beloved CRT television which is probably still working somewhere.

 

AMC was wonderful and did things right, back in the day - OLD films, all day, Bob Dorian and Nick Clooney as host. Then they shunted the b/w movies to the wee hours of the morning - hence began my taping, all gone now - fired the old guys, and brought in an 'actor' (at least TCM has RO and Manky - didja see that tan suit with the lavender appointments? very sharp) who now sells adult diapers on GetTV.

 

Ahhhhhh, and then there was TCM 20 years ago - glorious, in the beginning. Now............well, you know. Very good, but not glorious.

 

Ah well, nostalgia and a dollar won't get me on the subway.

Thank you for the compliment regarding my age.  Sometimes I get tired of hearing things like "oh, she wouldn't know who Humphrey Bogart (for example) is, she's too young," or "she's only 30, she's probably never even heard of xxx" I always respond with "try me" and usually, not only have I heard of xxx, but I know more about it they do.  I'm glad to see that there are younger members that are active on this board and to see people my age and younger who are interested in older films; unfortunately, there are a lot of people who won't even give a film a chance because it doesn't have color (Before everyone jumps on me about my comments re: silent films in another thread, I have tried watching some of them and couldn't get into it).  Lately, there seems to be a trend of people of my generation who are suddenly all about everything vintage and classic (aside from those who claim Marilyn Monroe and/or Audrey Hepburn are their favorite actress without having seen any of their films).  While I'm happy to see such a large interest in things that I've been interested in for almost 20 years or so, in a way, it's annoying because then all of a sudden, it makes me seem like I'm just following a trend (If that contradictory statement makes any sense). 

 

I grew up with Saturday morning cartoons, old Looney Tunes cartoons, Flintstones and Scooby Doo.  Saturday mornings, AMC used to show Laurel and Hardy.  I remember them also having New Years marathons of Three Stooges and I believe New Years Eve, they'd show the Marx Brothers films.  I remember Nick Clooney.  I also used to watch a lot of Biography on A&E with Peter Graves, before A&E went to the 85% reality show format.  We didn't have TCM when it first debuted, so I don't have any first hand recollection of its glory days in its infancy.  I did have it briefly in the late 90s when it was a cable channel you could get with the Expanded Basic cable package; but then it moved to some premium channel tier, and unfortunately, in the late 90s-early 00s (whenever this happened), my being in middle-early high school, I wasn't in the position to be dictating what cable package my parents had.  I went for years without TCM, so I was only able to watch old movies by renting the VHS at the video store or happening to catch it on TV or recording it on my VCR and crossing my fingers that the tape wouldn't run out and/or that I set up the recording properly.  In the meantime, during my TCM-less life, I got by watching Nick at Nite until it went down the tubes.  I finally got TCM again in 2007-ish when my now-husband and I got our first place together and I was finally the one paying the cable bill.  I've been spending the last years or so trying to discover and catch up on films I've missed, stars I was only slightly acquainted with or stars that I've never heard of at all.  It's been fun and I'm looking forward to seeing more and learning more.  This channel, PBS, and NFL RedZone are probably my favorite channels and I'm glad I have access to them. 

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I grew up with black & white in numerous forms (born in mid 80s.) When we were kids we watched Nick At Nite back when it showed only old 50s and 60s TV shows. We had Our Gang/Little Rascals and the Three Stooges on video. 

 

Knowing that warms the cockles of my heart. It confirms these truly are "classic". Classic means it can be enjoyed by any age/any culture. (although it helps the old TV shows & you are both US products)

 

It also confirms the validity of TCM's ESSENTIALS JR. to nurture future cinephiles.

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