Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Costume Design: Period and Timeless


 Share

Recommended Posts

Lavish costumes in "The Virgin Queen" (1955)

 

Private+Lives+of+Elizabeth+and+Essex+(19

 

 

bette-davis-virgin-queen--large-msg-1315

 

One thing Hollywood could not improve much on was weight of the clothing.  The costumes seemed as heavy  as the originals.   Bette Davis' makeup look very true to the age, however;  in Elizabethan time, the Queen wore white Lead mixed with vinegar.   Bette was very pale skin and rouge painted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Being that that is Errol Flynn in the first pic, these stills are from Davis' first foray as Queen Elizabeth, in 1939's (THE PRIVATE LIVES OF) ELIZABETH AND ESSEX.

errololivia.jpg

 

The costumes in this film are beautiful.  Even though Bette Davis' costumes are very elaborate and ornate; I prefer the dresses that her ladies in waiting, like Olivia de Havilland here, get to wear.

 

And, my favorite, this film features the gorgeous Errol Flynn, who is the only man that I can think of who could do justice to a pair of tights and very long boots. 

 

d7719e33-72d7-45f6-850c-a2d353c1ec19.png

 

While Bette went through painstaking lengths to try and look as authentic as possible to the real Elizabeth I, I really doubt the real Robert Deveraux looked like Errol Flynn. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A movie I haven't seen in decades but had quite an effect on me, was Nicholas and Alexandra (1971).   They promotional stories at the time included this side by side of the actual family w/the actors portraying them.

 

NICHOLAS1805e.jpg

 

 

 

Here are Michael Jayson and Janet Suzman with others in the recreation of that photo

sitting..

 

nicholas-and-alexandra1.jpg

 

Photography helped the costume designers keep the look authentic.  

 

suzamn.jpg

 

HIH, 

e5d5609a242c62edc2202a0ceac2ca1d.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A movie I haven't seen in decades but had quite an effect on me, was Nicholas and Alexandra (1971). They promotional stories at the time included this side by side of the actual family w/the actors portraying them.

 

NICHOLAS1805e.jpg

 

 

 

Here are Michael Jayson and Janet Suzman with others in the recreation of that photo

sitting..

 

nicholas-and-alexandra1.jpg

 

Photography helped the costume designers keep the look authentic.

 

suzamn.jpg

 

HIH,

e5d5609a242c62edc2202a0ceac2ca1d.jpg

Reminds me of a promotional short that aired some years back on AMC (before its downhill slide). It dealt with the choosing of Tippi Hedren's wardrobe for MARNIE. It was quite interesting,with Hedren modeling some of the designs she would be wearing.

 

Around that time,.AMC had an original series about Hollywood.designers, hosted by Darryl Hannah. It was quite interesting, another reason to regret that channels shift away from their original identity.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, thanks for pointing this one out. I never heard of it and I didn't want to fill up my DVR with anything from this century, but I'll check it out now-- or rather, check out the costumes ;)

 

I do hope that you capture it. I find it interesting on many levels. It is an experience to see The Hermitage as it was once populated. It shows the ages when there was true elegance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A movie I haven't seen in decades but had quite an effect on me, was Nicholas and Alexandra (1971).   They promotional stories at the time included this side by side of the actual family w/the actors portraying them.

 

NICHOLAS1805e.jpg

 

 

 

Here are Michael Jayson and Janet Suzman with others in the recreation of that photo

sitting..

 

nicholas-and-alexandra1.jpg

 

 

 

It is to me that those photographs show how many ways in which they made stupid mistakes. Most notable to me are the necklines. Fashion of the era dictated what was proper for girls at each age in their life. The costume designers seem to me to have done a mix-and-match with no regard for such decorum. It is also that he was known for wearing silk and leather as they were sides of his personality and rule. The costume is neither.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is to me that those photographs show how many ways in which they made stupid mistakes. Most notable to me are the necklines. Fashion of the era dictated what was proper for girls at each age in their life. The costume designers seem to me to have done a mix-and-match with no regard for such decorum. It is also that he was known for wearing silk and leather as they were sides of his personality and rule. The costume is neither.

---and the very modern hair as well

Link to comment
Share on other sites

---and the very modern hair as well

We need to remember about costuming and styling in that we are watching a fictionalized version of history.  Please let go of the concept that production companies are into museum curating. We're watching fiction, and the Producers are being artistic.  We haven't even touched (and this thread isn't going there about historical accuracy in fictionalized accounts).  They can't get the history right- they certainly won't do costumes precisely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We need to remember about costuming and styling in that we are watching a fictionalized version of history.  Please let go of the concept that production companies are into museum curating. We're watching fiction, and the Producers are being artistic.  We haven't even touched (and this thread isn't going there about historical accuracy in fictionalized accounts).  They can't get the history right- they certainly won't do costumes precisely.

Good point. My problem is it ruins my suspension of disbelief and sometimes just plain confuses me. I guess it wouldn't jar someone out of the movie that doesn't know about costume/fashion history, but it does for me. And I have the same problem if their behavior isn't consistent with the time period either. If the whole tone of the thing is postmodern and/or fun, I don't care, but my brain has trouble otherwise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good point. My problem is it ruins my suspension of disbelief and sometimes just plain confuses me. I guess it wouldn't jar someone out of the movie that doesn't know about costume/fashion history, but it does for me. And I have the same problem if their behavior isn't consistent with the time period either. If the whole tone of the thing is postmodern and/or fun, I don't care, but my brain has trouble otherwise.

oh, Lonesome, careful how you watch films.    I know you love some dearly, and since they are musicals, clearly you can suspend your disbelief concerning these encounters.  

 I used to have a problem with  movies concerning horror/violent films;  I have taken some effort to demystify myself from some of the more gruesome scenes I would watch (it tends to be corn syrup/food coloring/+corn starch to give it that dried effect).  It is not the effects that let me suspend my disbelief, but the story.  It all comes down to story and what emotions and feelings and outcome they want to convey.

 

Here's Seven Brides for Seven Brothers  

 

d2_004122.jpg

 

d2_003331.jpg

 

Seven+Brides+for+Seven+Brothers+make+pla

 

d2_014058.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

oh, Lonesome, careful how you watch films.    I know you love some dearly, and since they are musicals, clearly you can suspend your disbelief concerning these encounters.  

 I used to have a problem with  movies concerning horror/violent films;  I have taken some effort to demystify myself from some of the more gruesome scenes I would watch (it tends to be corn syrup/food coloring/+corn starch to give it that dried effect).  It is not the effects that let me suspend my disbelief, but the story.  It all comes down to story and what emotions and feelings and outcome they want to convey.

 

Here's Seven Brides for Seven Brothers  

 

 

 

 

 

So you have (had), some issues with horror films but not with musicals where men, in order to get mates, kidnap women?   ;)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So you have (had), some issues with horror films but not with musicals where men, in order to get mates, kidnap women?   ;)

 

It's an old Anglo-Saxon tradition. If the kidnappers are cute young men, and they can sing and dance, the legal system will sometimes overlook their old fashion habits, especially if the girls eventually give in and then dance and sing together with their kidnappers. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So you have (had), some issues with horror films but not with musicals where men, in order to get mates, kidnap women?   ;)

 

The practice of kidnapping women to be brides has a long history and is codified by tradition.

 

The Best Man at a wedding is meant to aid in the abduction and then to stand beside the groom so as to be a barrier to protect him from an attempt by the bride's family to rescue her.

 

The act of carrying the bride over the threshold signifies that the bride is not entering willingly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The practice of kidnapping women to be brides has a long history and is codified by tradition.

 

The Best Man at a wedding is meant to aid in the abduction and then to stand beside the groom so as to be a barrier to protect him from an attempt by the bride's family to rescue her.

 

The act of carrying the bride over the threshold signifies that the bride is not entering willingly.

 

Interesting.    Just another reason I'm not a fan of traditions.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

oh, Lonesome, careful how you watch films.    I know you love some dearly, and since they are musicals, clearly you can suspend your disbelief concerning these encounters. 

I didn't say I couldn't suspend my disbelief, I said I kept being jarred out of the film. That doesn't mean I turn the movie off. Many of my favorite movies have wildly inaccurate costumes, but usually it takes a few viewings to "get used to" the wild inaccuracies. I know, I'm what Katherine Hepburn called "an intellectual snob", but I was raised by a professional costumer. I can't help it. If I was raised by a professional lighting designer I'd be distracted by bad lighting. If I was raised by a horse trainer I'd be mad at bad horse riding. Etc, etc, etc. :)

 

Going back to favorites, love this little number from BALL OF FIRE (huge pic for some reason, sorry):

Annex%20-%20Stanwyck,%20Barbara%20%28Bal

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't say I couldn't suspend my disbelief, I said I kept being jarred out of the film. That doesn't mean I turn the movie off. Many of my favorite movies have wildly inaccurate costumes, but usually it takes a few viewings to "get used to" the wild inaccuracies. I know, I'm what Katherine Hepburn called "an intellectual snob", but I was raised by a professional costumer. I can't help it. If I was raised by a professional lighting designer I'd be distracted by bad lighting. If I was raised by a horse trainer I'd be mad at bad horse riding. Etc, etc, etc. :)

 

Going back to favorites, love this little number from BALL OF FIRE (huge pic for some reason, sorry):

 

 

Huge pic,  sorry???    I say THANK YOU!! 

 

Being raised by a professional costumer,  it makes sense your focus would be on the costumes.

 

I do the same with music especially when a movie shows someone playing guitar.   "hey, the chord I'm hearing is NOT the one the actor is shown playing'.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...