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I love "Penelope."  I'm disappointed that it is not on video--it's not even on any sort of print on demand service--so for now, until it is made available, it's just going to live on my DVR along with The Affairs of Annabel and Santa Fe Trail

 

Edith Head did a great job designing costumes for Natalie Wood.  My favorite (which I unfortunately couldn't find a picture of it) was the infamous yellow suit that ends up playing an integral role in the film.

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I love "Penelope."  I'm disappointed that it is not on video--it's not even on any sort of print on demand service--so for now, until it is made available, it's just going to live on my DVR along with The Affairs of Annabel and Santa Fe Trail

 

Edith Head did a great job designing costumes for Natalie Wood.  My favorite (which I unfortunately couldn't find a picture of it) was the infamous yellow suit that ends up playing an integral role in the film.

 

I find it surprising there are still orphaned movies out there,  I remember Penelope, though admittedly little of the plot.  Natalie Wood fans must miss it too. Another Edith Head creation. The Hollywood designers and costume makers were real workhorses.  

 

I could spend a whole page on the 60s era leading ladies, the 60s look of stars of Doris Day, Sandra Dee, Julie Andrews, Sophia Loren, Bridgette Bardot, Raquel Welch, Elke Sommer, Claudia Cardinale, Ali McGraw, Lena Horne, Julie Andrews, Nancy Kwan, Suzanne Pleshette, and Ursula Andress. and of course, there was Audrey Hepburn, Katherine Hepburn, and Faye Dunaway.  There were so many, and I didn't even touch television.

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b1892fdc580a46803b94618d2fbd61e9.jpg

HoldenIsHere wrote: Has PENELOPE been mentioned yet? The movie starred Natalie Wood with costumes by Edith Head.

 

 

Could this be the yellow suit?

Yes! Good job Casa! I love the color of that suit and Wood looked great in it!

 

My one complaint about 50/60s clothing is the trend of the woman's shoes, purse, gloves, everything being dyed to be the exact same shade of color as her dress.  I'm glad to see that Wood is mixing it up a bit with different colored accessories. 

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I find it surprising there are still orphaned movies out there,  I remember Penelope, though admittedly little of the plot.  Natalie Wood fans must miss it too. Another Edith Head creation. The Hollywood designers and costume makers were real workhorses.  

 

I could spend a whole page on the 60s era leading ladies, the 60s look of stars of Doris Day, Sandra Dee, Julie Andrews, Sophia Loren, Bridgette Bardot, Raquel Welch, Elke Sommer, Claudia Cardinale, Ali McGraw, Lena Horne, Julie Andrews, Nancy Kwan, Suzanne Pleshette, and Ursula Andress. and of course, there was Audrey Hepburn, Katherine Hepburn, and Faye Dunaway.  There were so many, and I didn't even touch television.

 

058-natalie-wood-theredlist.jpg

dorisdf.jpg11535821_1.jpg?v=8CE770C8FCA4790

 

 

...and speaking of orphaned movies from the 60s: WHAT'S SO BAD ABOUT FEELING GOOD?

Whats-So-Bad-About-Feeling-Good.-e136804

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Wow, that's Mary Tyler Moore!

I'd never heard of the movie WHAT'S SO BAD ABOUT FEELING GOOD?

It's one of my favorite movies that's not out anywhere. She and George Pappard are beatniks who get infected by a disease from the parrot. The disease makes you happy, which in NYC is a disaster, of course, so Dom DeLuise comes in to solve the crisis. Even I have only seen a video upload on youtube of a copy taped off TV with commercial breaks, but I still love it.

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  • 1 month later...

I saw this brand new coffee table book being advertised on the TCM site:

 

http://shop.tcm.com/detail.php?p=867241&ecid=Illusion_300x250_October

 

Creating the Illusion: A Fashionable History of Hollywood Costume Designers.  

 

It looks like a beautiful book.  However it is $65.  I'd love to take a look at the pictures.  Many films are made better with beautiful costumes.  

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It's one of my favorite movies that's not out anywhere. She and George Pappard are beatniks who get infected by a disease from the parrot. The disease makes you happy, which in NYC is a disaster, of course, so Dom DeLuise comes in to solve the crisis. Even I have only seen a video upload on youtube of a copy taped off TV with commercial breaks, but I still love it.

 

Don't mean to go political but, that sounds like the second hour of my Feel the Bern meetings. We always end up in too good of a mood to be discouraged. 

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I saw this brand new coffee table book being advertised on the TCM site:

 

http://shop.tcm.com/detail.php?p=867241&ecid=Illusion_300x250_October

 

Creating the Illusion: A Fashionable History of Hollywood Costume Designers.  

 

It looks like a beautiful book.  However it is $65.  I'd love to take a look at the pictures.  Many films are made better with beautiful costumes.  

 

Damn, I first need to buy a coffee table too - for the book.  

 

This is one where the Kindle version would not suffice.  

 

It is photo-heavy, as it should be.  You have me seriously examining my budget, Speedy.  It has been moved to the top of my wish list.  

 

Another one that is a fab photo Hollywood book is Hollywood in Kodachrome by Willis and Schmidt.  The photos leave you so nostalgic and not in a bad way.  I always feel somehow hopeful again after looking at it.

 

tumblr_my03jvXVuw1qcodkyo1_1280.jpg

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Are any of you familiar with Bill Thomas? The only reason I noticed his work is that he did the wardrobe of Donna Reed in The Benny Goodman Story. The clothes don't really fit in with the thirties setting of the movie (they're definitely 50's styles) but they were really beautiful. He worked on several high profile 50's movies including Imitation of Life and Magnificent Obsession among others. Just gorgeous stuff for those technicolor films.

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Are any of you familiar with Bill Thomas? The only reason I noticed his work is that he did the wardrobe of Donna Reed in The Benny Goodman Story. The clothes don't really fit in with the thirties setting of the movie (they're definitely 50's styles) but they were really beautiful. He worked on several high profile 50's movies including Imitation of Life and Magnificent Obsession among others. Just gorgeous stuff for those technicolor films.

 

Good eye, HelenBaby.  

 

Here is an example of how Bill Thomas set the social boundaries with his costumes.  Even the kitchen island is acting as an important prop in this scene.  Juanita Moore is dressed in dark blue throughout Imitation of Life, suggesting code for uniformity and devotion (true blue).

 

imitation4.jpg

 

Mennel_12.png

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I just love how ultra feminine his designs were. Look at those beautiful dresses Sandra & Juanita are wearing in that kitchen scene. He worked before & after the 50's but his high point was definitely the 50's. Looking at his credits, it looks like Sirk used his clothes in all his movies. Then he did a lot of work for Disney in the 60's.

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I just love how ultra feminine his designs were. Look at those beautiful dresses Sandra & Juanita are wearing in that kitchen scene. He worked before & after the 50's but his high point was definitely the 50's. Looking at his credits, it looks like Sirk used his clothes in all his movies. Then he did a lot of work for Disney in the 60's.

 

I bet he did Mary Poppins.   :wub:  Loved how the characters were dressed. 

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I bet he did Mary Poppins.   :wub:  Loved how the characters were dressed.

 

The credits say the the costumes were "executed" by him. Not sure what that means but there were 5 costume credits for Mary Poppins. Sounds like he worked on someone else's designs but I don't know that for sure.

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The credits say the the costumes were "executed" by him. Not sure what that means but there were 5 costume credits for Mary Poppins. Sounds like he worked on someone else's designs but I don't know that for sure.

 

Sounds like Disney-speak.  

 

Thomas won the Oscar for his work on Spartacus.  

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  • 3 months later...

I've been watching a ton of episodes of The Lucy Show which of course showcases the typical 1950s-early 60s fashion that you see not only on television but in movies as well.

 

Women wear a dress and then completely matching shoes and accessories.  I don't mean just merely matching, but these outfits are matching.  The shoes, purse, hat, gloves, everything is the exact same shade and hue as the dress.  

 

In Breakfast at Tiffany's, Holly Golightly's pink dress, pink coat, pink shoes and even the pink tiara are all exactly the same hue of pink.

 

16lb2ue.jpg

 

The matchy-matchy look is very clean (and in some cases, can look very polished) but in many cases, it is a very dated look. 

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I want to thank everyone for posting all the beautiful clothes and costumes. I wish people would wear stuff like that every day.

The resurrection of this thread made me sad when I read this comment from Fred, the first I've come across since the apparent confirmation of his death. Hopefully, Dobbs is in a.place where he can have visions of the technicolored, widescreen view of the world that prevailed in his formative years. Hopefully for him, the women there are dressed to the nines, with the fully matching accessorizations.

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