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Kid Dabb

The Good, the Bad, and the PBS

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After some decades, I've come to accept the "sponsors" listed before and after a PBS show - even though with recent cutbacks in funding many automobile manufacturers (among other various companies) have weaseled their way into these spots with their little ten-seconds of commercials.. er.."sponsorship notification". As long as these were listed before and/or after the uninterrupted show I was happy. Sort of.

 

Now, though, I'm beginning to see the gradual appearance of these "sponsorship notifications" in the middle of some programs.

 

PBS foodie shows are now advertising food products. Home repair/rebuilding/whatever shows push the Sears and Home Depot type products, along with dropping business names for their contractors. Artist's shows are pushing artist supplies. Car shows, car care and performance products. The automobile industry is everywhere now - they've got the big bucks to call the shots while the PBS stations' chips are down. I can see as many car commercials on PBS now as on morning network shows.

 

The end of an era <sigh>

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The automobile industry is everywhere now - they've got the big bucks to call the shots while the PBS stations' chips are down.

 

US auto industry has always run our country & lives....just look at our highway system! What a disaster. Now that we need it, there's no viable mass transit infrastructure left (except in mega cities like NY & Chicago)

 

I can see as many car commercials on PBS now as on morning network shows.

 

Well, that's kind of an exaggeration, isn't it? But I'm with you, it's startling to see commercials on PBS, no matter how they try to soften them, they're still commercials. A slippery slope.

 

Remember the Stella Artois commercials on TCM? A low point, imho.

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Im my area, there are also nods to the Karmanos Foundation...The Karmanos name being synonimous with the large cancer fighting hospital in the Detroit area.  Since it IS Detroit, auto ads arent't that frowned upon, especially if the corp. is mentioned as being contributors to public television.  I have no problem with it, really, since it's still limited to mere MENTION of the auto corporation, and NOT 30 second to one minute commercials as are seen on REGULAR TV.  But, if you're seeing those on PBS in YOUR region, I understand being upset.

 

Sepiatone

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After some decades, I've come to accept the "sponsors" listed before and after a PBS show - even though with recent cutbacks in funding many automobile manufacturers (among other various companies) have weaseled their way into these spots with their little ten-seconds of commercials.. er.."sponsorship notification". As long as these were listed before and/or after the uninterrupted show I was happy. Sort of.

 

Now, though, I'm beginning to see the gradual appearance of these "sponsorship notifications" in the middle of some programs.

 

PBS foodie shows are now advertising food products. Home repair/rebuilding/whatever shows push the Sears and Home Depot type products, along with dropping business names for their contractors. Artist's shows are pushing artist supplies. Car shows, car care and performance products. The automobile industry is everywhere now - they've got the big bucks to call the shots while the PBS stations' chips are down. I can see as many car commercials on PBS now as on morning network shows.

 

The end of an era <sigh>

 

Well if the option is NO PBS at all or PBS with some limited advertising,  which would you take?  

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Well if the option is NO PBS at all or PBS with some limited advertising,  which would you take?  

I can live with it when it is confined to before and after the programming. Now it's encroaching into the body of the programming AND not just a mention of the company - these are actual ads for automobiles as you might see on a network channel - only limited to 10 seconds.. for now.

 

I flip the channel at this point to find other programming.

 

--------------

For years, and this may still be the case.. I don't know, there were regulations in place to prevent saturday morning cartoon shows on network tv from placing commercials in spots during cartoons whose characters were being advertised in those advertisements, i.e, no Superman toys were to be advertised during Superman cartoons, etc. Conflict of interest or something like that.
 
Now, PBS is doing just that by allowing some of their "sponsors" to hawk their products under the guise of "sponsorship" - not commercials/ads.
 
I'm not really upset about this stuff, I would prefer it if PBS would take the full plunge into the dark side and let it go at that. They could get more and better funding and have at it.

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I think local PBS stations have different types of commercials.

 

In New Mexico, about every three months, the state-wide PBS channel stops airing regular PBS programs and they air info-mercials for about two weeks straight, during most of the evening hours.

 

And these are odd infomercials. They are usually lectures by “motivational speakers”, who tell a life studio audience how to think positive, eat the right food, get the right exercise, etc. Just a bunch of baloney. Normal stuff that our mothers taught us when we were kids.

 

They run these programs for about 15 minutes, then they have about 10 minutes of commercials, trying to sell us DVDs of the show we are watching, plus other DVDs of the same characters just talking, speaking, yapping about how to do the right thing.

 

A package of 5 DVDs might cost $150, which they call a “donation” to support the local PBS station. And for a $250 donation you can get a 10 DVD package.

 

And sometimes they show for a week, every night, several programs of old music videos, such as old black and white country music TV shows, average old pop music TV shows from the 1950s, etc., and they want a lot of money for DVDs of these show.

 

This goes on for about two weeks, then the regular PBS shows come back on for about two or three months, then back to the evenings of the commercials, with the same motivational speakers giving the same speeches!

 

And during the regular PBS programs, the last 6 minutes of every hour are reserved for regular types of commercials for companies that provide donations and financial support for the program we have just seen on PBS.

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Remember the Stella Artois commercials on TCM? A low point, imho.

 

I remember that. I thought that was the beginning of commercials on TCM.

 

I remember that the very first commercial on AMC started that way, with some car company sponsoring some "special showing" of some "special film", and the first commercial was about 15 to 20 seconds long, with a photo of a fancy Ford or some new car, and I think with no voice message, just a title saying Ford or something.

 

And then they were soon showing regular commercials in-between movies and then during movies and then for a while they changed formats to being a "Woman's Channel", then they changed formats again to what they are now.

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I think local PBS stations have different types of commercials.

 

In New Mexico, about every three months, the state-wide PBS channel stops airing regular PBS programs and they air info-mercials for about two weeks straight, during most of the evening hours.

 

And these are odd infomercials. They are usually lectures by “motivational speakers”, who tell a life studio audience how to think positive, eat the right food, get the right exercise, etc. Just a bunch of baloney. Normal stuff that our mothers taught us when we were kids.

 

They run these programs for about 15 minutes, then they have about 10 minutes of commercials, trying to sell us DVDs of the show we are watching, plus other DVDs of the same characters just talking, speaking, yapping about how to do the right thing.

 

A package of 5 DVDs might cost $150, which they call a “donation” to support the local PBS station. And for a $250 donation you can get a 10 DVD package.

 

And sometimes they show for a week, every night, several programs of old music videos, such as old black and white country music TV shows, average old pop music TV shows from the 1950s, etc., and they want a lot of money for DVDs of these show.

 

This goes on for about two weeks, then the regular PBS shows come back on for about two or three months, then back to the evenings of the commercials, with the same motivational speakers giving the same speeches!

 

And during the regular PBS programs, the last 6 minutes of every hour are reserved for regular types of commercials for companies that provide donations and financial support for the program we have just seen on PBS.

Dang, Fred. In these parts we're told these displays are "fund raisers". Here, we have two medical guys touting their special eating styles (not "diets") on adjacent PBS stations simultaneously. Both say their info is recently discovered and the basics of each one's offerings fly in opposition to each other. One says (various) fats are the main food for your brain - the other, fats are killing us.. even the so-called "good" fats, e.g., mono-saturated or unsaturated. Very different approaches.

 

Heck.. just buy both of their DVD sets for $250 each and go for it!

 

HA!

 

:lol:

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I remember that. I thought that was the beginning of commercials on TCM.

 

I remember that the very first commercial on AMC started that way, with some car company sponsoring some "special showing" of some "special film", and the first commercial was about 15 to 20 seconds long, with a photo of a fancy Ford or some new car, and I think with no voice message, just a title saying Ford or something.

 

And then they were soon showing regular commercials in-between movies and then during movies and then for a while they changed formats to being a "Woman's Channel", then they changed formats again to what they are now.

I about choked on that one. Their intent was to show how the making of an artisan brew was likened to the creation of classic films. The flimsiest of reasoning which, I suppose if you're making the rules, is a good rationale.

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Heck.. just buy both of their DVD sets for $250 each and go for it!

 

Yeah, it'll work because you won't have money left to buy groceries!

 

kbasa2.gif

 

I like when PBS has a "beg-a-thon" because they always trot out old but successful "specials." I'm interviewed on one of them.

 

Invariably, I'll get an email from some old high school chum that has spotted me, "Wow I recognised you right away! You look the same-fantastic for your age!!"

Well that's because the "special" is 15 years old! Of course I look 35....I was 35 when it was filmed!

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Heck.. just buy both of their DVD sets for $250 each and go for it!

 

Yeah, it'll work because you won't have money left to buy groceries!

 

kbasa2.gif

 

I like when PBS has a "beg-a-thon" because they always trot out old but successful "specials." I'm interviewed on one of them.

 

Invariably, I'll get an email from some old high school chum that has spotted me, "Wow I recognised you right away! You look the same-fantastic for your age!!"

Well that's because the "special" is 15 years old! Of course I look 35....I was 35 when it was filmed!

PBS makes out like giving to them is the equivalent of giving to save the children. Problem is boring shows don't feed anybody. The only thing they have that people love to sit through these days are those Dick Proenneke Alone in the Wilderness films.

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The only thing they have that people love to sit through these days are those Dick Proenneke Alone in the Wilderness films.

 

Are you kidding?

 

Downton Abbey & Masterpiece both have huge followings and can actually be called "hits". Not to mention stale but popular staples like Nature, Antiques Roadshow, Nova and all the new "history mystery" type shows.  And for whatever reason Ken Burns' stuff is still very popular.

 

I only have antenna TV and almost exclusively watch PBS. I generally enjoy American Masters, concert shows and the all day PD movie schedule to supplement DVD watching.  I never watch network TV & commercials (although I understand my favorites Penn & Teller have a new show that's worth looking into)

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PBS might pick up a fair bit of change from people who will

pledge money to avoid seeing Dr. Wayne Dyer specials.

If they start taking pledges for THAT purpose, I'M pulling out my checkbook PRONTO!

 

Of all the great stuff PBS COULD broadcast, I don't take interest in Mr. "I'mOK, You're OK".

 

Sepiatone

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PBS might pick up a fair bit of change from people who will

pledge money to avoid seeing Dr. Wayne Dyer specials.

I'll buy that for a dollar! Where do I send it?

:lol:

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The only thing they have that people love to sit through these days are those Dick Proenneke Alone in the Wilderness films.

 

Are you kidding?

 

Downton Abbey & Masterpiece both have huge followings and can actually be called "hits". Not to mention stale but popular staples like Nature, Antiques Roadshow, Nova and all the new "history mystery" type shows.  And for whatever reason Ken Burns' stuff is still very popular.

 

I only have antenna TV and almost exclusively watch PBS. I generally enjoy American Masters, concert shows and the all day PD movie schedule to supplement DVD watching.  I never watch network TV & commercials (although I understand my favorites Penn & Teller have a new show that's worth looking into)

No, I'm not kidding. There is something engrossing watching Dick Proenneke build his own cabin with his own hand-crafted tools and then hiking to observe flora and sheep and bears. Then it snows and Dick really had fun. :)

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US auto industry has always run our country & lives....just look at our highway system! What a disaster. Now that we need it, there's no viable mass transit infrastructure left (except in mega cities like NY & Chicago)

 

Well, just how are ya going to have any new transit infrastructure if private industry and their associated corporations are continually and routinely demonized in the news media?

There can and does come a point when criticism of businesspeople and the first, second and third guessing of their overall motives is no longer constructive but destructive of both incentive and resources.

I mean if some people are so head over heels determined to find fault with big business over...anything and everything...well sir...they're gonna find it!...perhaps whether anything is there or not. If some are bound and determined to find something dirty despite all rhyme and reason, they will find it...whether it be existent or non-existent. :)

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Well, just how are ya going to have any new transit infrastructure if private industry and their associated corporations are continually and routinely demonized in the news media?

There can and does come a point when criticism of businesspeople and the first, second and third guessing of their overall motives is no longer constructive but destructive of both incentive and resources.

I mean if some people are so head over heels determined to find fault with big business over...enthing and everything...well sir...they're gonna find it...perhaps whether anything is there or not. If some are bound and determined to find something dirty despite all rhyme and reason, they will find it... existent or non-existent. :)

 

The auto industry and their paid off politicians are the reason there is no "new transit infrastructure" in areas like Southern California.

 

Of course no one is finding fault with big business over anything and everything.    Instead what I see are people too scared or brainwashed to learn something.

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Despite having dozens of channels to choose from on my cable system, I still find PBS to be among my favorite "go to" stations if there isn't anything else on that appeals to me.  Granted, the pledge programming can be annoying and not all that entertaining (at least to me), but I understand why they do it.  I did have to laugh though, when someone thought there were too many pledge programs one year, they quipped that PBS ought to stand for "Please Buy Something"!

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Just like TCM, PBS has a very good Watch Online web site (http://video.pbs.org/programs/). It is very good for watching programs in HD if you don't have HD from your satellite or cable provider. I just connect my laptop to my TV using a HDMI cable so that I can watch it on my television.

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Not commercials, but..

 

I've been watching a lot more 30-60 minute interviews on PBS lately. There's something PBS is doing which I hadn't noticed before.. after watching, and being drawn into some rather good one-on-one interviews, the show will end in the middle of some good conversation and the interviewer will state something to the effect, "If you would like to hear THE REST of this interview, you can go to our website..".

 

Well, HE** NO!, I don't want to go to your website for the rest of an interview. You've got me hooked right here on your TV channel!

 

Now, I'm used to watching a COMPLETE show and THEN going to PBS' website for follow-up information and further details, but I ain't doin' this half-n-half thing.

 

Pass the jelly, please.

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Not commercials, but..
 
I've been watching a lot more 30-60 minute interviews on PBS lately. There's something PBS is doing which I hadn't noticed before.. after watching, and being drawn into some rather good one-on-one interviews, the show will end in the middle of some good conversation and the interviewer will state something to the effect, "If you would like to hear THE REST of this interview, you can go to our website..".
 
Well, HE** NO!, I don't want to go to your website for the rest of an interview. You've got me hooked right here on your TV channel!
 
Now, I'm used to watching a COMPLETE show and THEN going to PBS' website for follow-up information and further details, but I ain't doin' this half-n-half thing.
 
Pass the jelly, please.

 

 

yeah, noticed this on Food Network shows AND more irritating when Jon Stewart's doing an interesting interview for maybe 8 minutes, then says to see the rest ya gotta go to the website. As you say...Nuts to that, I'm listening NOW :angry:

 

(they must make more $ for hits on their website, is that it??)

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They could use a somewhat subtle form of blackmail. If our loyal

viewers do not pledge X amount of dollars by a certain time, we

will be forced to air a Wayne Dyer mini-marathon from 8 to 11

p.m. tomorrow evening.

Suze Orman on PBS? She oughta be. :lol:

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yeah, noticed this on Food Network shows AND more irritating when Jon Stewart's doing an interesting interview for maybe 8 minutes, then says to see the rest ya gotta go to the website. As you say...Nuts to that, I'm listening NOW :angry:

 

(they must make more $ for hits on their website, is that it??)

 

My understanding of what they are doing is using the web to test the market place.  i.e. something like a focus group.

 

I also watch the Food Network and Top Chef on Bravo and both are doing this 'for more, go to WWW,,,'.     If there is a good amount of traffic on the website they will turn that into a spinoff show or next time they do the show,  have the type of content one could only get the previous time on the web.     e.g..  the competitions between the losers of a cooking show.       

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My understanding of what they are doing is using the web to test the market place.  i.e. something like a focus group.

 

I also watch the Food Network and Top Chef on Bravo and both are doing this 'for more, go to WWW,,,'.     If there is a good amount of traffic on the website they will turn that into a spinoff show or next time they do the show,  have the type of content one could only get the previous time on the web.     e.g..  the competitions between the losers of a cooking show.       

 

if that would result in giving Jon Stewart a full hour to air an entire interview, I'd be all for it ;)

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if that would result in giving Jon Stewart a full hour to air an entire interview, I'd be all for it ;)

 

Agreed.  I wish The Daily Show was an hour.   That might be a little too long for a 5 day a week show but half an hour isn't enough.  e.g. the interview section always feels rushed.  

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