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September 2014 highlights-- what are you looking forward to on TCM?


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A few highlights:

 

Daytime:

Dr. Kildare on Saturday mornings

Ken Maynard westerns on Saturday mornings

Directed by Edward Dmytryk on September 4

Equestrian classics on September 8

Aline MacMahon films on September 9

Forties crime stories on September 10

Betsy Drake on September 11

Jackie Cooper on September 15

Tortured love stories on September 22

Mickey Rooney on September 23

Carroll Baker on September 24

Dennis O'Keefe on September 25

Classic Hitchcock on September 27

Unlikely pairs on September 28

Directed by Roy Del Ruth/William Beaudine on September 29

Deborah Kerr on September 30

 

Primetime:

Melvyn Douglas as Star of the Month

The Projected Image series focusing on Jewish representations

Friday Night Spotlight: Classic Pre-codes

Essentials: Singer Biopics; House of Ill Repute; Members of the Press; and New York Apartments

Telluride tribute on September 1

Guest Programmer Richard Linklater on September 4

Planet of the Apes double feature on September 7

Beatrice Lillie primetime spotlight on September 8

Jerry Lewis primetime spotlight on September 11

Lauren Bacall Memorial Tribute on September 15-16

George C. Scott primetime spotlight on September 25

Max Steiner primetime spotlight on September 29

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There are a lot of things I'm looking forward to this (next) month. Besides the Pre-Code spotlight, there's a number of things on Edward Dmytryk's day, especially Hitler's Children, Obsession, and The Sniper. Later that day is a film called Forbidden Games which looks interesting, I hope I'll be able to catch it. Beatrice Lillie day holds a lot of interest, too.

 

I just noticed a TCM Underground feature that intrigues me greatly, also, a couple of documentaries about musicians; guitarist Mance Lipscomb, and Zydeco accordionist Clifton Chenier, both coming on after something called The Sid Saga, the subject of which is new to me.

 

I'm a bit disappointed that The Hospital seems to have disappeared from George C. Scott day, replace by The Hindenburg, I believe. Oh well, don't count your chickens, I suppose.

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There are a lot of things I'm looking forward to this (next) month. Besides the Pre-Code spotlight, there's a number of things on Edward Dmytryk's day, especially Hitler's Children, Obsession, and The Sniper. Later that day is a film called Forbidden Games which looks interesting, I hope I'll be able to catch it. Beatrice Lillie day holds a lot of interest, too.

 

I just noticed a TCM Underground feature that intrigues me greatly, also, a couple of documentaries about musicians; guitarist Mance Lipscomb, and Zydeco accordionist Clifton Chenier, both coming on after something called The Sid Saga, the subject of which is new to me.

 

I'm a bit disappointed that The Hospital seems to have disappeared from George C. Scott day, replace by The Hindenburg, I believe. Oh well, don't count your chickens, I suppose.

THE SNIPER is a very good Columbia noir. It was Dmytryk's first Hollywood film after he recanted and was taken off the blacklist. I am looking forward to seeing OBSESSION as well.

 

I am also disappointed THE HOSPITAL was removed. Maybe it will reappear on the schedule in February for the 31 Days of Oscar, since it earned Scott a Best Actor nomination.

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Metropolitan -- one of my favorite Whit Stillman films

Pather Panchali 

Blonde Venus -- one of Von Sternberg's best; underrated I think; I'll be more than browsing, I will watch it!

 

and the double bill of Caged and House of Women, which shows the difference between noir cynicism and 50's fantasy.

 

Also the Jewish series

 

and

Mae West (though not the two I'd like to see most).

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...the double bill of Caged and House of Women, which shows the difference between noir cynicism and 50's fantasy.

 

 

I think HOUSE OF WOMEN is considered a (loose) remake of CAGED. Shirley Knight is quite good but she's no Eleanor Parker. It was made in the early 60s.

 

You also mentioned Mae West. We did have an evening of her films earlier this summer. I agree that the ones appearing in September are her most frequently aired titles, and it would be nice for a change to see her star-making turn in NIGHT AFTER NIGHT.

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I think HOUSE OF WOMEN is considered a (loose) remake of CAGED. Shirley Knight is quite good but she's no Eleanor Parker. It was made in the early 60s.

 

You also mentioned Mae West. We did have an evening of her films earlier this summer. I agree that the ones appearing in September are her most frequently aired titles, and it would be nice for a change to see her star-making turn in NIGHT AFTER NIGHT.

Yes -- the West films were on in early July I think, I missed them. They are probably the best, and most often shown, but my particular favorites are Every Day's a Holiday and Klondike Annie. 

 

And yes -- House of Women is a loose remake, but the ending is totally different, very 50s, even though the much more hard-bitten original was made only a few years before. As I recall Barbara Nichols is particularly good.

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The biggest highlight is easily the Breen-free Fridays.  Not too many premieres, but tons of films that don't show up very often.

 

A few others that we don't get to see all that much:

 

7 Sunday 12:00 AM Within Our Gates (1920)  

In this silent film, a black schoolteacher finds the battle against racism is everywhere when she goes North to raise money for better schools.

Dir: Oscar Micheaux Cast:  Evelyn Preer , Flo Clements , James D. Ruffin .

BW-78 mins,

2:00 AM Battle of Algiers, The (1966)  

Algiers revolts against the French Foreign Legion.

Dir: Gillo Pontecorvo Cast:  Jean Martin , Yacef Saadi , Brahim Haggiag .

BW-121 mins, Letterbox Format

4:15 AM Hands Over the City (1963)  

A corrupt developer is exposed when one of his building collapses.

Dir: Francesco Rosi Cast:  Salvo Randone , Rod Steiger , **** Alberti .

BW-101 mins, Letterbox Format

14 Sunday 12:00 AM Lady Of Chance, A (1928)  

In this silent film, a female con artist lures men to her apartment so she can blackmail them.

Dir: Robert Z. Leonard Cast:  Norma Shearer , Lowell Sherman , Gwen Lee .

BW-78 mins,

2:00 AM Il Sorpasso (1961)  

A shy law student meets a bon vivant who takes him for a drive through the Roman and Tuscan countryside.

Dir: Dino Risi Cast:  Vittorio Gassman , Jean-Louis Trintignant , Catherine Spaak .

BW-105 mins, Letterbox Format

4:00 AM Roma (1972)  

A small boy in love with Rome grows up to film the city in all its charismatic chaos.

Dir: Federico Fellini Cast:  Federico Fellini , Peter Gonzales , Stefano Mayore .

C-118 mins, Letterbox Format

 

   

 

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I'm looking forward to the Pre-Code Fridays. 

 

I'm going to be TCM-less the first week of September (going on vacation), so I'll have to make sure to DVR everything that I wanted to see.

 

I'm also looking forward to:

 

-The Lauren Bacall Memorial Tribute on the 15-16th

-The William Holden daytime theme on the 2nd, there are a couple films scheduled that I haven't seen yet.

-The evening SOTM schedules, featuring Melvyn Douglas, has a ton of interesting sounding films that I may want to watch.

 

 

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Although there are many interesting films that will be new to me, I was sorry to see that The World of Apu has disappeared from the schedule.  This is at least the second time that particular film has appeared on a preliminary schedule but not on the final one, so now I'm wondering whether there's a difficult-to-resolve rights issue.

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Although there are many interesting films that will be new to me, I was sorry to see that The World of Apu has disappeared from the schedule.  This is at least the second time that particular film has appeared on a preliminary schedule but not on the final one, so now I'm wondering whether there's a difficult-to-resolve rights issue.

Pather Panchali, which is the first film in the trilogy, is scheduled. I can't imagine (though I could be wrong) that the rights issues would be any different for the third part of the trilogy. 

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Pather Panchali, which is the first film in the trilogy, is scheduled. I can't imagine (though I could be wrong) that the rights issues would be any different for the third part of the trilogy. 

 

Pather Panchali definitely is in the clear, because TCM showed it back in October as part of the "Story of Film" series.  That's why I'd prefer Apu this time.  For now I guess Apu will have to stay on my "get-from-Netflix-the-next-time-I-join" list.

 

ETA:  One curious thing about this schedule is that Avalon, which TCM has scheduled on September 3, is due to be shown on Movies! on September 2.  Roman Holiday has been shown on both networks recently, but not just one day apart.

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Pather Panchali definitely is in the clear, because TCM showed it back in October as part of the "Story of Film" series.  That's why I'd prefer Apu this time.  For now I guess Apu will have to stay on my "get-from-Netflix-the-next-time-I-join" list.

I'd like to see a comprehensive S. Ray festival on TCM.  Days and Night in the Forest and The Philosopher's Stone are two I would particularly like to see again.

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One curious thing about this schedule is that Avalon, which TCM has scheduled on September 3, is due to be shown on Movies! on September 2.

 

This has nothing to do with either Avalon or The Jewish Experience, but the next time TCM shows a Barry Levinson movie from his "Baltimore triology", I sure wish it'd be Tin Men, one of the great comedies of all time.  What perhaps only a few hardcore TCM buffs might realize is that the opening scene that sets the stage for the blood feud between Richard Dreyfuss and Danny DeVito was taken from the W.C. Fields segment of If I Had A Million.  In both cases the action opens with a new car being driven out of the dealership and immediately crashed into by an inattentive driver crossing his path in the street.  In fact what would really be great is to show that Fields segment as a prelude to the Tin Men feature, since they complement each other perfectly.

3348769.jpgtin-men-devito.jpg

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I am looking forward to the following events or films, not in any specific order:

 

Being There: It was relevant 34 years ago...and with the advent of 24 hour news and politicians really geared to the soundbite even more so.  Most likely too is my own 34 maturing years and growing sceptisicm of all that is told to me over the airwaves.  In this day and age if you haven't been taught to think for yourself you are really in danger of being susceptible to "Gardnerisms" and those who spout them.

 

Hitler's Children:  a scary thought as I personally see more of a society compartmentalism (e.g. ISIS, Left vs. Right and evanglism of any topic) leading to the potential of a new Hitler with a much more deadly supply of wepons and the ability via the Web and Social Media for a stronger influence on those who may not have much in the way of critical thinking.  

 

The Jewish Experience, especially commentary by the Rabbi.

 

Melvyn Douglas films.

 

And the irony of celebrating Jerry Lewis on 9/11.  (a personal observation, please no tirades)  

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I'm looking forward to the Pre Code Fridays; especially on Friday 9/26 when TCM premieres

"Call Her Savage" with Clara Bow. This is one of the best pre-codes ever.  I'm hoping it's the recently restored version that was shown at TCM's film festival a few years ago. I just wish that this pre code gem was being shown in prime time hours, not at 2am. It deserves a prime time slot on the schedule.

Now if only TCM could get "Hoopla" Clara's last talkie.

 

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On Monday the 22nd, beginning in prime time, we've got five straight Brigitte Bardot films, including the one that made her famous right there in the leadoff position. The only letdown is Contempt, but that's due to the godawful quality of the dubbed soundtrack.

 

8:00 PM And God Created Woman (1956)  

A young woman loves one brother but marries the other.

Dir: Roger Vadim Cast:  Brigitte Bardot , Curt Jurgens , Jean-Louis Trintignant .

C-91 mins, Letterbox Format

9:45 PM Parisienne, Une (1957)  

The daughter of a big French politico marries his secretary, but when her husband starts fooling around, she takes off to the Riviera.

Dir: Michel Boisrond Cast:  Charles Boyer , Henri Vidal , Brigitte Bardot .

C-85 mins, Letterbox Format

11:30 PM Plucking the Daisy (1956)  

A Paris schoolgirl unwittingly ignites hellfire in the minds of men from Seine to Sorbonne.

Cast:  Brigitte Bardot ,

BW-102 mins,

1:30 AM Night Heaven Fell, The (1958)  

A convent girl vacationing in Spain finds herself in a romance with a murderer.

Dir: Roger Vadim Cast:  Brigitte Bardot , Alida Valli , Stephen Boyd .

C-91 mins, Letterbox Format

3:15 AM Contempt (1963)  

A film production of The Odyssey causes friction in a marriage

Dir: Jean-Luc Godard Cast:  Brigitte Bardot , Jack Palance , Michel Piccoli .

C-103 mins, Letterbox Format

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