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So Which Version of SHANE Will TCM Show Sunday Evening?


TomJH
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Will it be the original version of director George Stevens or will it be the altered (botched?) DVD version of a Paramount Home Video sound mixer?

 

SPOILER ALERT FOR THOSE WHO HAVE YET TO SEE THIS WESTERN CLASSIC:

 

Contrary to the popular and often repeated legend of this film, the final words on its soundtrack uttered by Brandon de Wilde were NOT "Shane, come back."

 

The final words originally spoken by de Wilde, when the film had approximately 20 seconds to go, were "Bye, Shane."

 

The words were very subdued but can be heard if one concentrates to hear them in the shot in which the gunman on horseback in the mountains, left arm stiff at his side from a bullet wound, comes riding into view towards the camera. It was, I always felt, a touching acknowledgement from the little boy who, at the last moment, suddenly realized that his hero was not returning.

 

However, in the DVD release of Shane that came out around 2003 those words were completely missing. Whether by accident or intentional (and there's little reason to think it anything but an accident) the sound mixer turned up Victor Young's musical score at the precise point of hearing the gentle "Bye Shane" cry from de Wilde, drowning out the words in the process.

 

Surprisingly at the time, I heard no one comment upon this alteration to the film's audio track, including even a hint of a complaint from George Stevens Jr. who was involved in the DVD restoration of one of his father's most celebrated films at the time.

 

I have heard that the Blu-ray version of Shane apparently corrected this error, returning the film's original two words to the soundtrack. However, I haven't heard the blu-ray version myself in order to verify whether this is true.

 

So that is my question. When TCM broadcasts Shane Sunday at 8pm (EST), will we or won't we hear little Joey's final words?

 

shane15_zps8393f4e7.jpg

 

This is the image shown on screen when Joey shouts, "Bye, Shane" about 20 seconds before the film ends.

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We will see the version that is cheapest for TCM to rent, that's what we will see.

To tell you the truth, so few seem to be aware of the DVD audio error, that I have to wonder if TCM was aware of it when the channel sought a print of the film to show. 

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To tell you the truth, so few seem to be aware of the DVD audio error, that I have to wonder if TCM was aware of it when the channel sought a print of the film to show. 

 

This DVD audio error has been mentioned on this forum many times.    One would hope someone in the TCM programming department would be aware of it,  but even if they were it doesn't mean that they would take the effort to obtain a correct version.

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Ah! But THAT wasn't REALLY the original ending at all here, folks!

 

Nope, ORIGINALLY there was ALSO an additional bit of footage after the whole "Bye, Shane" line. Uh-huh, about 10 seconds after little Brandon says 'Bye, Shane", he THEN yells out..."Not comin' back then, huh?! Well then, f*** you, Shane!"

 

(...but wiser heads prevailed and THAT bit of footage was left on the cutting room floor!)

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Ah! But THAT wasn't REALLY the original ending at all here, folks!

 

Nope, ORIGINALLY there was ALSO an additional bit of footage after the whole "Bye, Shane" line. Uh-huh, about 10 seconds after little Brandon says 'Bye, Shane", he THEN yells out..."Not comin' back then, huh?! Well then, f*** you, Shane!"

 

(...but wiser heads prevailed and THAT bit of footage was left on the cutting room floor!)

Another bit of true Hollywood lore from Cowboy Groucho that can only be read here, folks! :rolleyes:  

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Will it be the original version of director George Stevens or will it be the altered (botched?) DVD version of a Paramount Home Video sound mixer?

 

SPOILER ALERT FOR THOSE WHO HAVE YET TO SEE THIS WESTERN CLASSIC:

 

Contrary to the popular and often repeated legend of this film, the final words on its soundtrack uttered by Brandon de Wilde were NOT "Shane, come back."

 

The final words originally spoken by de Wilde, when the film had approximately 20 seconds to go, were "Bye, Shane."

 

The words were very subdued but can be heard if one concentrates to hear them in the shot in which the gunman on horseback in the mountains, right arm stiff at his side from a bullet wound, comes riding into view towards the camera. It was, I always felt, a touching acknowledgement from the little boy who, at the last moment, suddenly realized that his hero was not returning.

 

However, in the DVD release of Shane that came out around 2003 those words were completely missing. Whether by accident or intentional (and there's little reason to think it anything but an accident) the sound mixer turned up Victor Young's musical score at the precise point of hearing the gentle "Bye Shane" cry from de Wilde, drowning out the words in the process.

 

Surprisingly at the time, I heard no one comment upon this alteration to the film's audio track, including even a hint of a complaint from George Stevens Jr. who was involved in the DVD restoration of one of his father's most celebrated films at the time.

 

I have heard that the Blu-ray version of Shane apparently corrected this error, returning the film's original two words to the soundtrack. However, I haven't heard the blu-ray version myself in order to verify whether this is true.

 

So that is my question. When TCM broadcasts Shane Sunday at 8pm (EST), will we or won't we hear little Joey's final words?

 

shane15_zps8393f4e7.jpg

 

This is the image shown on screen when Joey shouts, "Bye, Shane" about 20 seconds before the film ends.

 

 

This has infurtiated me since they restored the film some years ago.  They found the music tracks and decided to re-mix the end title music, thus making the above-described error.  Glad to hear it's been fixed.  It's an important button on the film, which lets you know that Joey is resigned to Shane's leaving and will not be tortured by his departure.

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This has infurtiated me since they restored the film some years ago.  They found the music tracks and decided to re-mix the end title music, thus making the above-described error.  Glad to hear it's been fixed.  It's an important button on the film, which lets you know that Joey is resigned to Shane's leaving and will not be tortured by his departure.

Ray, my source that the blu-ray version of Shane corrected the "Bye Shane" error was from a poster on these boards last year. Again, I haven't actually seen it myself.

 

Therefore, I will be tuning into TCM this evening hoping that a corrected print of the western will be broadcast.

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This has infurtiated me since they restored the film some years ago.  They found the music tracks and decided to re-mix the end title music, thus making the above-described error.  Glad to hear it's been fixed.  It's an important button on the film, which lets you know that Joey is resigned to Shane's leaving and will not be tortured by his departure.

If they do not air a correct print tonite than they have some kinda nerve totin' themselves as these great unparalleled cinema aficionadoes. :angry:

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shane15_zps8393f4e7.jpg

 

A final reminder, it's at this moment in the film, 20 seconds before the western's end, that viewers will hopefully hear the faint cry of Brandon de Wilde shouting, "Bye, Shane" in TCM's presentation tonight.

 

If those words aren't heard, then we are being served the botched sound mixer's DVD version of the film, rather than the picture as originally envisioned by director George Stevens.

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It seems to me that the day for night scenes were too dark in this print.

 

In the scene where Shane and Wilson first meet, at Starrett's ranch, I could hardly see their faces, while I remember earlier prints that were quite bright and clear and my memory tells me that scene was shot in and shown as daylight.

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It seems to me that the day for night scenes were too dark in this print.

 

 

I'm very pleased, of course, that TCM showed the proper audio version of Shane, with those two poignant final words shouted by Joey.

 

However, I agree with this statement of your's so much, Fred, that I wish George Stevens had not elected to shoot the final scene of the film as day for night because of its darkness.

 

The standard DVD has the same problem (with the additional issue of the "Bye Shane" missing, too, of course).

 

Has anyone seen the blu-ray version of Shane to know if the night scenes are any clearer?

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I heard it as well.  Very faintly but it came through.  This was the first time I had and it did put a softer ending to the story. 

 

It was also the first time I really saw how Chris/Ben Johnson progressed from bully to sensible after he sees Torrey killed by Wilson for no good reason.  It was tough rooting against good old Ben and I'm glad his character got out alive and wiser. 

 

I'm also curious about what Marian's wedding dress was made of.  It was definitely not white but looked at times like silver or pale pink.  Was it satin?  It did grab your attention. 

 

It's one of the most realistic Westerns ever made.  No fancy town but a bunch of ramshackle buildings just slapped together, dirt streets and the plainest of costumes.  The characters sweated and looked like they worked hard in less than pristine conditions.  You felt as if you were there.  That's what makes it such a great movie. 

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The cast of Shane is hard to fault.

 

Alan Ladd is perfectly cast as the gunman. He brings a sense of decency to his role. There is also that aura of sadness that Ladd had that was perfect for the role of a gunfighter with a questionable past who sensed that his future was undoubtedly limited.

 

While Jack Palance is a memorable black and white hissable villain, I also enjoy the less celebrated characterization of Emile Meyer as Rufus Ryker. You can see that he tries his best to reason with Joe Starrett and only relucantly resorts to hiring a gunfighter as a last resort. And when he has his speech about how he and other original pioneers fought the Indians and "tamed" the area, you can see his viewpoint, and understand his resentment of the homesteaders' moving in afterward. At the same time, the film, of course, is highly sympathetic to the homesteaders, but I appreciate it taking the time to show Ryker's viewpoint, as well.

 

Except for Palance there are no real villains in this film.

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There obviously is a better looking image of Shane around than the one broadcast on TCM this evening.

 

Anyone notice that after the film ended and the show returned to host Bill Hader that the brief clip they showed of the day for night scene ending with Shane riding towards the mountains and Joey calling after him was far cleaner and brighter than than on the print of the film we had just viewed on the channel?

 

Why couldn't TCM have shown us that version instead?

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The cast of Shane is hard to fault.

 

Alan Ladd is perfectly cast as the gunman. He brings a sense of decency to his role. There is also that aura of sadness that Ladd had that was perfect for the role of a gunfighter with a questionable past who sensed that his future was undoubtedly limited.

 

While Jack Palance is a memorable black and white hissable villain, I also enjoy the less celebrated characterization of Emile Meyer as Rufus Ryker. You can see that he tries his best to reason with Joe Starrett and only relucantly resorts to hiring a gunfighter as a last resort. And when he has his speech about how he and other original pioneers fought the Indians and "tamed" the area, you can see his viewpoint, and understand his resentment of the homesteaders' moving in afterward. At the same time, the film, of course, is highly sympathetic to the homesteaders, but I appreciate it taking the time to show Ryker's viewpoint, as well.

 

Except for Palance there are no real villains in this film.

 

While I could see William Holden in the role of Joe Starrett, I am very pleased the Montgomery Clift was unavailable as Shane. The same can be said for Kate Hepburn as Mariam.

 Stevens wanted Alan Ladd for  the role of Jedd Rink in his epic "Giant", but Ladd turned him down because he would have had to take third billing under Rock Hudson and Liz Taylor. I'm sure Ladds wife/agent had a lot to do with his decision. For years every time Stevens saw Ladd he yelled at Ladd "You made me work with James Dean"

 

According to what I've read and heard Ladds main problem was he had no confidence in himself as an actor, Olivia de Havilland said this when she appeared with him in "The Proud Rebel". She said she talk to him and told him he was a much better actor then he gave himself credit for. But he didn't believe her. So sad...

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I think some people, maybe some low-level guys at print or electronic labs, or some higher level “restorers” at major studios or distributors do some of their own manipulating, without asking anyone's permission..

 

Anyone along the way, during any of the copy and dub sessions, can program their printers (mechanical or electronic) to turn ANY outdoor daylight scene into a day-for-night final result.

 

I think some people have done this, because I know I’ve seen much brighter prints on TCM in the past, and the first meeting between Wilson and Shane was almost in full daylight originally, since the expressions on their faces were very important to see. But we could not see those expressions in tonights dark scenes. Someone was responsible for making tonights print too dark in the day-for-night scenes.

 

This puts TCM people in the position of demanding a print with "Bye Shane" on the sound track, and the day-for-night scenes being brighter than tonight's print, just like the film original day-for-night scenes were much brighter when I first saw it on the big screen in 1953, and on earlier TCM prints, which is an impossible position for TCM to be in.

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