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Does anyone find SONG OF THE SOUTH (1946) offensive...?

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As a WHITE GUY, I never thought LESS of black people because of BRE'R Rabbit. 

 

I also didn't think LESS of black people because of LITTLE BLACK S A M B O.  In fact, the story reveals how CLEVER S A M B O was in outthinking the TIGERS.  Even enjoying the PANCAKES made from the BUTTER created from the tigers chasing each other around a tree.  HOW can anyone find any of that offensive?

 

I sure didn't think less of "colored" folk because of AMOS 'N' ANDY.  I simply viewed them as a "colored" version of LAUREL AND HARDY.  The local TV stations used to show them on Saturday afternoons along with old reruns of the ABBOTT AND COSTELLO television show.  And I always thought AMOS 'N' ANDY were FUNNIER!

 

Of course, I was much younger then, and nobody as of yet had bothered to "teach" me that "colored" people were to be hated and feared. 

 

Sepiatone

Look up S*a*m*b*o's restaurants on Wikipedia without the asteriks..

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As a WHITE GUY, I never thought LESS of black people because of BRE'R Rabbit. 

 

I also didn't think LESS of black people because of LITTLE BLACK S A M B O.  In fact, the story reveals how CLEVER S A M B O was in outthinking the TIGERS.  Even enjoying the PANCAKES made from the BUTTER created from the tigers chasing each other around a tree.  HOW can anyone find any of that offensive?

 

I sure didn't think less of "colored" folk because of AMOS 'N' ANDY.  I simply viewed them as a "colored" version of LAUREL AND HARDY.  The local TV stations used to show them on Saturday afternoons along with old reruns of the ABBOTT AND COSTELLO television show.  And I always thought AMOS 'N' ANDY were FUNNIER!

 

Of course, I was much younger then, and nobody as of yet had bothered to "teach" me that "colored" people were to be hated and feared. 

 

Sepiatone

 

I assume you already know the answer to the question of: HOW can anyone find any of that offensive?

 

If not,  I'm amazed.       As I said I before I find asking such a question is offensive  to those that find the said 'item' offensive.

 

It is similar to when someone says "I love the movie XYZ' and someone replies 'HOW can anyone love that movie'.

 

Why can't people just accept that other people,  based on having different life experiences,  find different things offensive,  love different movies, music, art,  etc....

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There's nothing wrong with anything an American says in movies or in public it's called freedom of speech. The only ones that complain are those that want to control what people think and say. Point of interest is the story of Little Black ****. It was written by an English woman Helen Bannerman in India and it's about an Indian boy living their not about African's. In case you don't know it there are no Tigers in Africa. It seems ever since the 60's all anyone has time for is complaining about everything. I make it a point to collect everything I can that this government or any other government tries to suppress. The people today are to thin skinned and go crying every time someone says boo. In case you don't know it the biggest brain washing studio in America is Disney. Their programming is aimed at kids no different then the Third Reich did with their kids.
They put forth the liberal view and condemn the right wing view.
 I noticed that TCM doesn't mind censoring my post but they sit there and condemned the censoring that was done in the past to the movies. Do they talk out of both sides of their mouth?


 

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There's nothing wrong with anything an American says in movies or in public it's called freedom of speech. The only ones that complain are those that want to control what people think and say. Point of interest is the story of Little Black ****. It was written by an English woman Helen Bannerman in India and it's about an Indian boy living their not about African's. In case you don't know it there are no Tigers in Africa. It seems ever since the 60's all anyone has time for is complaining about everything. I make it a point to collect everything I can that this government or any other government tries to suppress. The people today are to thin skinned and go crying every time someone says boo. In case you don't know it the biggest brain washing studio in America is Disney. Their programming is aimed at kids no different then the Third Reich did with their kids.

They put forth the liberal view and condemn the right wing view.

 

 

 

To me you wish to control what people think and say,  by not wanting them to complain or be offended by something they see.

 

Like you, people that complain about content are just expressing their opinion and using their freedom of speech. 

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There's nothing wrong with anything an American says in movies or in public it's called freedom of speech. The only ones that complain are those that want to control what people think and say.

 

 

 

Telling the truth and telling lies are both freedom of speech. I sometimes complain about the lying, though.

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Telling the truth and telling lies are both freedom of speech. I sometimes complain about the lying, though.

And when liars get corrected, they often try to claim that they're being "suppressed" or "bullied".  They can dish it out but they can't take it.

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I sure didn't think less of "colored" folk because of AMOS 'N' ANDY.  I simply viewed them as a "colored" version of LAUREL AND HARDY.  The local TV stations used to show them on Saturday afternoons along with old reruns of the ABBOTT AND COSTELLO television show.  And I always thought AMOS 'N' ANDY were FUNNIER!

 

Sepiatone

 

******************************

 

I'm of two minds about all this.  I loved the earlier books with their marvelous stories and would never want them taken off the shelves.  On the other hand, the use of pejoratives is a terrible thing and demeans the people spoken of.  But for sheer wonderful, glorious humor nothing can beat "Penrod" and its magnificent battle between Herman and Verman, the two black boys, and Rupe Collins, the bully from "up at the Third."  Granted, the language is not what we would have it.  But oh, the outcome of that fight, the description of Verman and the rake, and Herman with the scythe and his intentions with regard to it, are worth every bit of swallowing of righteous indignation that one has to do in this era at the language and the dialect. 

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I'm of two minds about all this.  I loved the earlier books with their marvelous stories and would never want them taken off the shelves.  On the other hand, the use of pejoratives is a terrible thing and demeans the people spoken of.  But for sheer wonderful, glorious humor nothing can beat "Penrod" and its magnificent battle between Herman and Verman, the two black boys, and Rupe Collins, the bully from "up at the Third."  Granted, the language is not what we would have it.  But oh, the outcome of that fight, the description of Verman and the rake, and Herman with the scythe and his intentions with regard to it, are worth every bit of swallowing of righteous indignation that one has to do in this era at the language and the dialect. 

 

I am glad you mentioned the Penrod story. Author Booth Tarkington, a Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, is probably less regarded today than other Pulitzer recipients...and I wonder if it is because many of his stories contain elements that do not seem politically correct by our modern hyper-sensitive standards. He's a superb author. 

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I am glad you mentioned the Penrod story. Author Booth Tarkington, a Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, is probably less regarded today than other Pulitzer recipients...and I wonder if it is because many of his stories contain elements that do not seem politically correct by our modern hyper-sensitive standards. He's a superb author. 

 

How good, nobody will ever know who didn't live in that time.  Perceptions of authors change with decades of cultural difference.  But this remains the best fight ever described.  http://www.online-literature.com/tarkington/penrod/23/

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Why not remake it? Clean up the offensive parts, use new actors, put some new songs, computerize it etc.

Lobotomize the audience? Have them wear a tag proving they were lobotomized before they can buy a ticket?

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Why not remake it? Clean up the offensive parts, use new actors, put some new songs, computerize it etc.

Remake SONG OF THE SOUTH? I doubt that would ever happen...

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There can be no "remake" of this film.

 

It is unique.

 

There can be a newer and similar type of film, with, let's say, a black producer, director, and screenwriter, who just pretty much leaves out white adults altogether and makes it a mostly-kid film, with Uncle Remus as the star.

 

Give this one a few more years and it will be accepted again. All it needs is a new introduction by someone like Morgan Freeman, playing a wealthy modern businessman, living in a big expensive house, opening a DVD package of this old film, and telling his grand kids about the old days when he was a kid, and this is about an old uncle of his, old uncle Remus, who used to work on an old plantation, and he was the kindest, most loved, and most intelligent man on the whole plantation, and this is how he used to tell stories to all the plantation kids.

 

I've noticed that modern black story tellers of today actually do like old Uncle Remum's old-fashioned dialect. I think it is because they remember some of their own old family members who used to talk that way.

 

Back in the 1980s, I worked with a very smart black reporter who could imitate this Uncle Remus dialect, and also imitate old white Southern accents, and he was a big hoot when he did skits of old blacks talking to old whites, with their antique rural accents.

 

A lot of people never realized that Steve Urkle on TV was an imitation of a geeky white teenager and a white teenage accent, but once you know it, the whole joke and impersonation is very funny:

 

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Give this one a few more years and it will be accepted again. All it needs is a new introduction by someone like Morgan Freeman, playing a wealthy modern businessman, living in a big expensive house, opening a DVD package of this old film, and telling his grand kids about the old days when he was a kid, and this is about an old uncle of his, old uncle Remus, who used to work on an old plantation, and he was the kindest, most loved, and most intelligent man on the whole plantation, and this is how he used to tell stories to all the plantation kids.

 

I've noticed that modern black story tellers of today actually do like old Uncle Remus old-fashioned dialect. I think it is because they remember some of their own old family members who used to talk that way.

 

 

 

For once, I am speechless. If I had a facepalm icon, I would use it here. 

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For once, I am speechless. If I had a facepalm icon, I would use it here. 

 

I'm with you brother!    Just so far out there,  I'm speechless.

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I wrote this in another thread, and I'd like to paste it here, because I think it's relevant to our on-going discussion about this Disney classic:

 

(Some are) taking a reactionary stance due to brainwashing. Since the 1960s, a lot of whites have been force-fed a guilt about things previous generations did long before they were born. But you know what's worse...When other people today refuse to feel the guilt, so we have to work overtime to put a thick layering of guilt on them or else to intimidate them into being quiet because they are not politically correct. 

 
Once we get past that, maybe we can enjoy SONG OF THE SOUTH without any outside hindrance or weirdly affixed guilt.

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I wrote this in another thread, and I'd like to paste it here, because I think it's relevant to our on-going discussion about this Disney classic:

 

(Some are) taking a reactionary stance due to brainwashing. Since the 1960s, a lot of whites have been force-fed a guilt about things previous generations did long before they were born. But you know what's worse...When other people today refuse to feel the guilt, so we have to work overtime to put a thick layering of guilt on them or else to intimidate them into being quiet because they are not politically correct. 

 
Once we get past that, maybe we can enjoy SONG OF THE SOUTH without any outside hindrance or weirdly affixed guilt.

 

quite so, TopBilled, quite so. I wasn't alive in 1861 floggin' anybody. :) and by ignoring the very existence of song of the south aren't some people disrespecting actor James Baskett and his special oscar for his heartwarming and charming performance as uncle remus?

that ain't right. James Baskett deserves to be honored.

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I wrote this in another thread, and I'd like to paste it here, because I think it's relevant to our on-going discussion about this Disney classic:

 

(Some are) taking a reactionary stance due to brainwashing. Since the 1960s, a lot of whites have been force-fed a guilt about things previous generations did long before they were born. But you know what's worse...When other people today refuse to feel the guilt, so we have to work overtime to put a thick layering of guilt on them or else to intimidate them into being quiet because they are not politically correct. 

 
Once we get past that, maybe we can enjoy SONG OF THE SOUTH without any outside hindrance or weirdly affixed guilt.

 

 

Why can't each person view SOTS as they wish just like any movie?     Ok,  you enjoy SOTS.   I get that.  I'm fine with that (not that it matters).  What I still don't understand is why you are pushing so hard for others to view the movie the same way as you.

 

I assume this when you say 'maybe we can enjoy'.   Why the 'we'?    As for brainwashing;  some would say you're the one that is brainwashed.    By saying brainwashed you're saying that your POV is the only valid one.

 

PS:  And what about people like me that are NOT black or white?   What 'we voice' is the correct one for us?

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I wrote this in another thread, and I'd like to paste it here, because I think it's relevant to our on-going discussion about this Disney classic:

 

(Some are) taking a reactionary stance due to brainwashing. Since the 1960s, a lot of whites have been force-fed a guilt about things previous generations did long before they were born. But you know what's worse...When other people today refuse to feel the guilt, so we have to work overtime to put a thick layering of guilt on them or else to intimidate them into being quiet because they are not politically correct. 

 
Once we get past that, maybe we can enjoy SONG OF THE SOUTH without any outside hindrance or weirdly affixed guilt.

 

 

Ain't nobody in here but us brainwashed zombies!

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Ain't nobody in here but us brainwashed zombies!

many of us who have viewed sots sometime in our lives have heard others maintain that the film reflects racism and stereotypes. you have a story of two white southern children in a post-civil war environment who develop a rapport with a kindly negro ex-slave. uncle remus does not see two white children. he merely sees two children, period, who are receptive to his guidance. personally, I think the bug in some people's ear about this film is that they would prefer a cinema portrait of newly freed negro slaves in the post-civil war south fuming with hatred and resentment for every white person in sight young or old. and Mr. Disney wasn't going to feed that fever.

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they would prefer a cinema portrait of newly freed negro slaves in the post-civil war south fuming with hatred and resentment for every white person in sight young or old

 

I'd watch that. Not sure I'd enjoy it, but I'd watch it.

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I'd watch that. Not sure I'd enjoy it, but I'd watch it.

We've had Cry Freedom so why not Cry Hatred? :D

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Why can't each person view SOTS as they wish just like any movie?     Ok,  you enjoy SOTS.   I get that.  I'm fine with that (not that it matters).  What I still don't understand is why you are pushing so hard for others to view the movie the same way as you.

 

I assume this when you say 'maybe we can enjoy'.   Why the 'we'?    As for brainwashing;  some would say you're the one that is brainwashed.    By saying brainwashed you're saying that your POV is the only valid one.

 

PS:  And what about people like me that are NOT black or white?   What 'we voice' is the correct one for us?

Your voice is for you to determine. I know what my voice is, I know what side of the issue(s) I am on--I doubt I am brainwashed by anything. My posting history here suggests that I am a critical thinker, not afraid to take a stand, even an unpopular one.   :)

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