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Help with "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"


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I recall seeing this in the 70s and recently watched both the Twilight Zone and the Alfred Hitchcock Presents version but they both didn't end the way I recall when I first saw it. I'm pretty sure it was the Twilight Zone version I watched.

The ending I saw was after the spy was hanged one of the union soldiers said something like 'I wonder what goes thru a mans mind during during that drop' which I thought perfectly summed up the spy's hallucination.

So my question is does anybody who seen it recall that ending? Was that scene deleted due to time constraint for reruns?

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DocXC-kobmU

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I don't remember any dialogue but I think the TZ airing was of the French Short with no editions but for Serling's spots.

 

Maybe it was a mental splice on your part. You imagined that dialogue and spliced it into your memory of the film.

 

Or did you maybe read Bierce's story? It contains this quote:

 

"As these thoughts, which have here to be set down in words, were flashed into the doomed man’s brain rather than evolved from it the captain nodded to the sergeant. The sergeant stepped aside."

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The ending I saw was after the spy was hanged one of the union soldiers said something like 'I wonder what goes thru a mans mind during during that drop' which I thought perfectly summed up the spy's hallucination.

So my question is does anybody who seen it recall that ending? Was that scene deleted due to time constraint for reruns?

 

 

I saw the original when it first aired on TV. Most of the dreams of his wife and home took place while he was dropping.

 

If I remember correctly, without dialogue, he was marched across the bridge, with his hands tied up, and a noose was placed over his head and neck, at one end of the bridge. Then he seemed to slip or fall or break the rope and escape and run away and get back to his wife. But at the very end, we hear the loud "ca-thunk" sound of the rope tightening as he dropped, and he died when he was hanged (without escaping). It is only then. at the very end, that we realize he was only dreaming about his "escape" and his meeting with his wife.

 

In the introduction, Rod Serling said that this was the only TZ episode that was made by an outside film crew. He said it was made in France by a French crew and was submitted to the Twilight Zone show, which decided to air it as a Twilight Zone episode.

 

La Rivière du Hibou (French, "The Owl River"; English title: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge) is a 1962 French short film based on the American short story An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (1891) by Ambrose Bierce. It was directed by Robert Enrico and produced by Marcel Ichac and Paul de Roubaix with music by Henri Lanoë. It won awards at the Cannes Film Festival and the Academy Awards. It was also screened on American television as an episode of The Twilight Zone in 1964.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Occurrence_at_Owl_Creek_Bridge_%28film%29

 

Two years after its production, the film was screened on American TV as part of the fantasy/science fiction show The Twilight Zone. Producer William Froug saw the film and decided to buy the rights to broadcast it on American television. The transaction cost The Twilight Zone $25,000 – significantly less than the average of $65,000 they expended on producing their own episodes. However, Froug’s purchase allowed for the film to be aired only twice (the first airing was on February 28, 1964). Consequently, it is not included on The Twilight Zone’s syndication package (although it is included on Image Entertainment's DVD box set of the original series and on the DVD Treasures of the Twilight Zone).

The episode's introduction is notable for Rod Serling breaking the fourth wall even more than usual, as he explains how the film was shot overseas and later picked up to air as part of The Twilight Zone.

 

The introduction by Rod Serling is as followed:

 

Tonight a presentation so special and unique that, for the first time in the five years we've been presenting The Twilight Zone, we're offering a film shot in France by others. Winner of the Cannes Film Festival of 1962, as well as other international awards, here is a haunting study of the incredible, from the past master of the incredible, Ambrose Bierce. Here is the French production of "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge."

 

Rod Serling even provided a closing narration for this adaptation:

 

An occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge - in two forms, as it was dreamed, and as it was lived and died. This is the stuff of fantasy, the thread of imagination... the ingredients of the Twilight Zone.

Edited by FredCDobbs
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The final line is what I really remember because it blew me away with how it summed up the film but then maybe I was the one who was hallucinating.

 

Thanks for your response.

 

Oh, and about that "final line"..... It was Rod Serling who actually said it, in a voice-over, as we still see the film of the guy hanging from the bridge.

 

Serling said:

 

"An occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge - in two forms, as it was dreamed, and as it was lived and died. This is the stuff of fantasy, the thread of imagination... the ingredients of the Twilight Zone."

 

This is the way I remember the original presentation, and I think this is the same as the version you posted.

 

(And see my post below this one.)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DocXC-kobmU

Edited by FredCDobbs
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My clearest memory of my first viewing was the final line when a one solider says to another about 'what goes thru a man's mind.' In my memory it definitely wasn't Rod Serling.

 

Maybe after all these years I mixed it up with something else or I created that ending In my mind.

 

Anyway I think it should have ended with that line.

 

Thanks for your response.

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