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EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE


HoldenIsHere
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I thought it was a great idee. We women do indeed buy skivvies for our men.

 

Another film in which Warren William plays a nasty business sort of a man. He always seems to play a nasty type. Even in The Wolf Man he was a fink.

William actually does play the "good guy" in several films, notably Three on a Match (which plays later tonight), Imitation of Life,  and Gold Diggers of 1933.  Not coincidentally, those are his three most forgettable roles, even though the films themselves are terrif.

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I'm rather surprised no one seems to have mentioned the definite homoerotic subtext to the second half of the movie (I'd seen it before, back when Loretta was SOTM in January 2013) which was where I came in on it today...Warren seemed to be practically proposing marriage to whoever the guy was that played Loretta's husband.

 

Downright kinky. Almost foreign in a sensibility (man seduces a couple.)

 

There may not have been a literal three some in Employee's Entrance, but it comes a whole lot closer than Design for Living.

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I'm rather surprised no one seems to have mentioned the definite homoerotic subtext to the second half of the movie (I'd seen it before, back when Loretta was SOTM in January 2013) which was where I came in on it today...Warren seemed to be practically proposing marriage to whoever the guy was that played Loretta's husband.

 

Downright kinky. Almost foreign in a sensibility (man seduces a couple.)

 

There may not have been a literal three some in Employee's Entrance, but it comes a whole lot closer than Design for Living.

 

Yeah when the boss asks Loretta's boyfriend (later husband) to be his assistant and talks about girls being nothing but trouble there was a definite "Hmm" moment . .  even knowing that Warren has already been shown to be a womanizer (Boy, don't try to front, ah-ah . . .apologies to Britney).

 

And then the boyfriend asks, "Well. don't you like women?"

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Yeah when the boss asks Loretta's boyfriend (later husband) to be his assistant and talks about girls being nothing but trouble there was a definite "Hmm" moment . .  even knowing that Warren has already been shown to be a womanizer (Boy, don't try to front, ah-ah . . .apologies to Britney).

 

And then the boyfriend asks, "Well. don't you like women?"

I bet any number of psychology students and sexuality theorists would have a ball analyzing Employee's Entrance; Camille Paglia would probably write a two-hundred page thesis on the double entendre of the title alone.

 

One could also make the case that Warren seduced Loretta merely as a way of getting closer to her husband....I've also had more than one friend espouse the theory to me that many habitual womanizers turn out to be gay.

 

Any which way you slice it, I really do think Employee's Entrance is the most perverse, twisted, and depraved portrayal of sex found in an American movie made before 1934 that I have seen.

 

Let's hope they show it again soon!

 

PS- If anyone can think of a more twisted Pre-Code, please lemme know.

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I'm rather surprised no one seems to have mentioned the definite homoerotic subtext to the second half of the movie (I'd seen it before, back when Loretta was SOTM in January 2013) which was where I came in on it today...Warren seemed to be practically proposing marriage to whoever the guy was that played Loretta's husband.

 

Downright kinky. Almost foreign in a sensibility (man seduces a couple.)

 

There may not have been a literal three some in Employee's Entrance, but it comes a whole lot closer than Design for Living.

 

I caught that too, but saw a bigger vibe of the same sort in yesterday's viewing of Little Caesar. How come no women in Rico's life?

And he did declare how he was sorry for his 'love' of Fairbanks.

Again, we're probably reading too much modern sensibilites into movies from the 30s....maybe ;)

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I caught that too, but saw a bigger vibe of the same sort in yesterday's viewing of Little Caesar. How come no women in Rico's life?

And he did declare how he was sorry for his 'love' of Fairbanks.

Again, we're probably reading too much modern sensibilites into movies from the 30s....maybe ;)

 

No, I don't think so at all. The "gay thing" is totally there in Little Caesar. I see it too and so do others.

 

Besides- who wouldn't go at least a little gay for Doug Jr? Grrrrrrrrrwl!

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No, I don't think so at all. The "gay thing" is totally there in Little Caesar. I see it too and so do others.

 

Besides- who wouldn't go at least a little gay for Doug Jr? Grrrrrrrrrwl!

FYI, "When the film was released, Burnett (author of orig. novel) apparently drew this same conclusion about the screen version of the character. Having written Rico as explicitly heterosexual in his novel, Burnett wrote a letter of complaint to the film's producers about the conversion of the character to gay in the screen adaptation."

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Warren William has this knack, I think, of being a thoroughly nasty guy -- that you somehow can't quite hate completely.  I suspect it's because William was, by accounts that I've read, a pretty down to earth guy.  I think that humanity comes through, even when he's dropping yappy little rat-dogs in the trash bin. Personally, I think he's got something there...

 

William did get typecast into these rolls, however -- something he wasn't happy about -- but also something he never pushed back on too hard....

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Warren William has this knack, I think, of being a thoroughly nasty guy -- that you somehow can't quite hate completely.  I suspect it's because William was, by accounts that I've read, a pretty down to earth guy.

 

William did get typecast into these roles, however -- something he wasn't happy about -- but also something he never pushed back on too hard....

Hey- you gots to eat.

 

Before the boards underwent their "improvements" we had a pretty aggressive fan club for Warren William- there was even a pretty popular and long-lasting thread recommending him for SOTM (something I think would be great.) I just now wikipedia'd him and was surprised to learn he died in 1948 at the age of 53; his wife died mere months after.

 

Before Pre-Code movies got to be a much-deserved cause celebre, I was only familiar with WW via The Wolf Man, which is not the best introduction to his work since he has- oddly as he was still a "name" at the time- an extremely brief role (maybe just one scene and four of five lines of dialogue.) Maybe it was kind of a stunt casting since he was also in The Lone Wolf film series at the time; maybe a lot of his scenes hit the floor (the film was trimmed down to a tidy seventy minutes.)

 

Either way, Warren William would make an excellent SOTM choice and I hope he gets his moment some time before they decide to trot out Burt Lancaster or Angela Lansbury for their third time. 

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William actually does play the "good guy" in several films, notably Three on a Match (which plays later tonight), Imitation of Life,  and Gold Diggers of 1933.  Not coincidentally, those are his three most forgettable roles, even though the films themselves are terrif.

 

And least we not forget one of Warren's most memorable roles as Dave the Dude in LADY FOR A DAY(1933), and where while playing a gangster, he's one with the proverbial heart of gold.

 

(...and was MUCH better cast in that role than would be Glenn Ford some three decades later in Capra's own remake of his film)

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I think in the annals of HOLLYWOOD, The Loretta Young Story has been one of the most sadly overlooked and neglected of all the Big Star Bios- because, honestly, the arc of her career and the tumult in her personal life rivals (or at least matches) in interest those of Crawford, Hepburn, Davis, etc.

 

There are almost four Lorettas- Pre Code Loretta (1930-1934); Glamour Loretta (1934-1945), Serious Actress Loretta (1946-1950) and TV Loretta (post 1952) and I think she is most unfairly dismissed by many because of her well-documented religiosity, which sometimes crept into her work; and the fact that she packed up the act so soon after winning the Oscar and took it to TV (and I have to admit, not only is The Loretta Young Show really campy, it's shameless in the way it re-heats the plots of some of her movies.)

 

But of all her personas- even post- Farmer's Daughter, where she gave some winning performances in films like Rachel and the Stranger and Cause for Alarm- Pre-Code Loretta is just the best.

 

I remember in the documentary about pre-codes that TCM did, a very dignified older woman being interviewed mentioned that Norma Shearer- always thought of as a dignified, stuffy "lady"- "your mother's movie star" was actually (her words) "sl ut city" during the pre-code days. this is a great quote, but I have to beg to differ, Loretta Young was the Mayor Emeritus of Sl ut City pre-1934. There is a level of honesty and real daring in so many of her films then- from Midnight Mary (a favorite) to Man's Castle and Employee's Entrance; it's a shame she didn't stay as courageous and bold an actress (although she did do some excellent work after the code came in to effect.)

 

if it's a pre-code with Loretta, it is always worth watching.

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I think in the annals of HOLLYWOOD, The Loretta Young Story has been one of the most sadly overlooked and neglected of all the Big Star Bios- because, honestly, the arc of her career and the tumult in her personal life rivals (or at least matches) in interest those of Crawford, Hepburn, Davis, etc.

 

There are almost four Lorettas- Pre Code Loretta (1930-1934); Glamour Loretta (1934-1945), Serious Actress Loretta (1946-1950) and TV Loretta (post 1952) and I think she is most unfairly dismissed by many because of her well-documented religiosity, which sometimes crept into her work; and the fact that she packed up the act so soon after winning the Oscar and took it to TV (and I have to admit, not only is The Loretta Young Show really campy, it's shameless in the way it re-heats the plots of some of her movies.)

 

But of all her personas- even post- Farmer's Daughter, where she gave some winning performances in films like Rachel and the Stranger and Cause for Alarm- Pre-Code Loretta is just the best.

 

I remember in the documentary about pre-codes that TCM did, a very dignified older woman being interviewed mentioned that Norma Shearer- always thought of as a dignified, stuffy "lady"- "your mother's movie star" was actually (her words) "sl ut city" during the pre-code days. this is a great quote, but I have to beg to differ, Loretta Young was the Mayor Emeritus of Sl ut City pre-1934. There is a level of honesty and real daring in so many of her films then- from Midnight Mary (a favorite) to Man's Castle and Employee's Entrance; it's a shame she didn't stay as courageous and bold an actress (although she did do some excellent work after the code came in to effect.)

 

if it's a pre-code with Loretta, it is always worth watching.

 

I think in the annals of HOLLYWOOD, The Loretta Young Story has been one of the most sadly overlooked and neglected of all the Big Star Bios- because, honestly, the arc of her career and the tumult in her personal life rivals (or at least matches) in interest those of Crawford, Hepburn, Davis, etc.

 

There are almost four Lorettas- Pre Code Loretta (1930-1934); Glamour Loretta (1934-1945), Serious Actress Loretta (1946-1950) and TV Loretta (post 1952) and I think she is most unfairly dismissed by many because of her well-documented religiosity, which sometimes crept into her work; and the fact that she packed up the act so soon after winning the Oscar and took it to TV (and I have to admit, not only is The Loretta Young Show really campy, it's shameless in the way it re-heats the plots of some of her movies.)

 

But of all her personas- even post- Farmer's Daughter, where she gave some winning performances in films like Rachel and the Stranger and Cause for Alarm- Pre-Code Loretta is just the best.

 

I remember in the documentary about pre-codes that TCM did, a very dignified older woman being interviewed mentioned that Norma Shearer- always thought of as a dignified, stuffy "lady"- "your mother's movie star" was actually (her words) "sl ut city" during the pre-code days. this is a great quote, but I have to beg to differ, Loretta Young was the Mayor Emeritus of Sl ut City pre-1934. There is a level of honesty and real daring in so many of her films then- from Midnight Mary (a favorite) to Man's Castle and Employee's Entrance; it's a shame she didn't stay as courageous and bold an actress (although she did do some excellent work after the code came in to effect.)

 

if it's a pre-code with Loretta, it is always worth watching.

 

What daring pre-code actress did stay as courageous and bold?     The production code didn't give producers, directors and actors much choice in the matter.   

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I bet any number of psychology students and sexuality theorists would have a ball analyzing Employee's Entrance; Camille Paglia would probably write a two-hundred page thesis on the double entendre of the title alone....

 

I can't stop laughing at that. ( Maybe because I'm a double entendre fan.)

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Hey- you gots to eat.

 

Before the boards underwent their "improvements" we had a pretty aggressive fan club for Warren William- there was even a pretty popular and long-lasting thread recommending him for SOTM (something I think would be great.) I just now wikipedia'd him and was surprised to learn he died in 1948 at the age of 53; his wife died mere months after.

 

Before Pre-Code movies got to be a much-deserved cause celebre, I was only familiar with WW via The Wolf Man, which is not the best introduction to his work since he has- oddly as he was still a "name" at the time- an extremely brief role (maybe just one scene and four of five lines of dialogue.) Maybe it was kind of a stunt casting since he was also in The Lone Wolf film series at the time; maybe a lot of his scenes hit the floor (the film was trimmed down to a tidy seventy minutes.)

 

Either way, Warren William would make an excellent SOTM choice and I hope he gets his moment some time before they decide to trot out Burt Lancaster or Angela Lansbury for their third time. 

He would be a great SOTM He fit well into these roles in part because he looked and sounded like a sleazier version of John Barrymore.u

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What daring pre-code actress did stay as courageous and bold?     The production code didn't give producers, directors and actors much choice in the matter.   

It's  a somewhat small sorority of actresses who did pre-code films and remained vital throughout the forties. Joan Blondell, Kay Francis and Ann Dvorak all had career cool-downs post-code and Shearer, Swanson, Ruth Chatterton and Nancy Carroll were all put out to pasture.

 

Of those who did though, I think Stanwyck kept her toughness; Crawford didn't do anything like Rain again- as far as real unsundry material goes- but I think she reclaimed the defiance that she displayed in her pre-code work once she took it to Warner's. (K. Hepburn didn't really do anything that risque to begin with, Lombard died, and Bette Davis's career didn't really take off until right after the code kicked in.)

 

I don't want to make generalizations, since there are some Young titles like Along Came Jones that I've yet to see- but I think post-code Loretta was across-the-board a gentler, meeker, more refined and ladylike LoYo- she lost the edge she displayed in her pre-1934 work and really re-invented her whole screen personality as something totally different from what it had been.

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Hey, guys, since we're talking about pre-codes, can I just say something about Three On a Match ?

 

("Yes, you can. Go ahead, Miss W."  "Thank you, you're very kind...")

 

I'd never seen this famous pre-code before, and made a point of staying up Friday night to catch it. I'm proud to say I stayed awake for the entire 63 minutes.

Anyway - maybe others have already said this, but wow, it was so strange to watch Joan ( gotta love Joan Blondell), Anne Dvorak (and yup, I pronounce it De-Vor-zjak, too bad for you, Anne) and Bette Davis in this thing, and to see Bette get the smallest part. The smallest, most boring part of the three !

 

I kept going, whenever she was on- which wasn't often -"hey, Bette Davis ! "  But then she'd be gone again. Her character was the tamest of the three, and she must have had a total of 10 lines in the whole movie.

How things changed in just a couple of years !

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