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What's this got to do with Movies?


Mac_the_Nice
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I'm glad you created this thread since I didn't wish for music to take over that Jewish Experience thread.    (but I did read your last post there). 

 

I can see that the styles of music you like are all over the map and I just love that.    Gatton;  Sad he died so young,  but what a guitar player.   The albums I have lean more toward jazz (e.g. the one he did with the organ player De Franco).     But Gatton's blues work is out of this world.

 

I love music from Brazil especially playing Jobin tunes.   This is one of the friendly 'debates' I have with my Gypsy Jazz friends.   After playing from their songbook (Minor Swing, et all),  I'll ask 'hey,  how about we play a Bossa'.     Instead they just start playing I'll See you in My Dreams.    I think they are sending me a message!

 

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I hope you don't mind if I jump in here and add a few examples of films featuring some of my favorite music. I'm not a musician, can't play a note, but one of the reasons I find classic films intriguing is the opportunity to "see" as well as hear these extraordinary performers (I would have included a short featuring Django and Grappelli but I see you have alluded to his genius).

 

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Carlos Gardel, who appeared with Mona Maris in Cuesta Abajo (1934), was a tango musician and singer extraordinaire and is still revered in Spanish speaking countries (he rates a reference in Love In The Time Of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez). Charlie Chaplin was a fan and good friend, and Gardel made at least one film in the states.

 

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Amália Rodrigues, who appeared in Les Amants Du Tarde (1955), was a Portuguese actress and singer. She is often referred to as the Rainha do Fado (Queen of Fado) for popularizing the fado form on singing throughout the world (please see the film clips below).

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I hope you don't mind if I jump in here and add a few examples of films featuring some of my favorite music. I'm not a musician, can't play a note, but one of the reasons I find classic films intriguing is the opportunity to "see" as well as hear these extraordinary performers (I would have included a short featuring Django and Grappelli but I see you have alluded to his genius).

 

 

 

In a chicken \ egg type of way,  jazz music got me into 'old' (studio-era) movies and vise-versa.    I started to play jazz and learned a few jazz standards.  I asked my teacher where those songs came from and he said most were written for movies or plays by people like Porter,  Kern,  Berlin,  etc...   So I started to watch these 'old' movies.  Either I would watch a movie and hear a song I liked and then learn to play that song,  OR,   learn a song and then find out what movie it was in and go watch that movie.

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I'm glad you created this thread since I didn't wish for music to take over that Jewish Experience thread.    (but I did read your last post there). 

 

I can see that the styles of music you like are all over the map and I just love that.    Gatton;  Sad he died so young,  but what a guitar player.   The albums I have lean more toward jazz (e.g. the one he did with the organ player De Franco).     But Gatton's blues work is out of this world.

 

I love music from Brazil especially playing Jobin tunes.   This is one of the friendly 'debates' I have with my Gypsy Jazz friends.   After playing from their songbook (Minor Swing, et all),  I'll ask 'hey,  how about we play a Bossa'.     Instead they just start playing I'll See you in My Dreams.    I think they are sending me a message!

You know James, what knocks me out about Tom Jobim almost so much as hearing the guy play and sing, is just to look at those arrangements he wrote, you know, on the chart, marveling to see the incredible ingenuity of those chord movements, the modulations back and forth between keys, as one finds them for a song like "How Insensitive." Blows me away every time.

 

As for your Gypsy Jazz pals, you might try turning them on to the Rosenberg Trio's performance of Wave, even if it's not really Samba anymore the way they play it. Heck of a lot of fun though. . .

 

 

 

So big deal. We'll always have this . . .

 

 

 

I'll be posting again about Danny. It's swell to see your appreciation of him, James, is no less than mine. Love that Sun Records Elvis Trilogy they do, also to be found now on YouTube. We saw them on that Austin City Limits show and became instant fans. I immediately started teaching it to my students. :-)

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"I hope you don't mind if I jump in here and add a few examples of films featuring some of my favorite music."

Oh, heck no! That was fun. Thanks for posting those. What a magnificent looking actress in that first clip. And speaking of music from film and film scores, if you ever saw  Krzysztof Kieślowski's "The Double Life of Veronique" you too may have been blown away by that score, those musical performances as were we. Took some doing but I finally tracked down the name of the composer, who turns out not to be "some obscure Dutch composer of two centuries ago" as related fictionally in the film. Not at all!  It's Zbigniew Preisner, of whom we may read, with astonishment at Wiki, that "Zbigniew Preisner studied history and philosophy in Kraków. Never having received formal music lessons, he taught himself music by listening and transcribing parts from records." Omigod!  Who would believe it, listening to this . . .

 

 

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. . .speaking of music from film and film scores, if you ever saw  Krzysztof Kieślowski's "The Double Life of Veronique" you too may have been blown away by that score, those musical performances as were we. Took some doing but I finally tracked down the name of the composer, who turns out not to be "some obscure Dutch composer of two centuries ago" as related fictionally in the film. Not at all!  It's Zbigniew Preisner, of whom we may read, with astonishment at Wiki, that "Zbigniew Preisner studied history and philosophy in Kraków. Never having received formal music lessons, he taught himself music by listening and transcribing parts from records." Omigod!  Who would believe it, listening to this . . .

Mac, thanks for all the wonderful music and videos you've shared here. I was familiar with some, especially that of Black Orpheus, but many of the musicians and singers are new to me. Thank you especially for sharing the video of Cesária Évora, what a tiny powerhouse she is!

 

Thank you also for the background information of TDLOV and Zbigniew Preisner. I'm a big fan of Krzysztof Kieślowski's Trois Couleurs trilogy: Bleu, Blanc et Rogue, but I had never seen his other films. The Blue film falls nicely in the film/music area given the plot revolves around the last work of a composer (music by Zbigniew Preisner). Your reference to TDLOV is a small bit of synchronicity; the film has come to my attention several times over the past week, and put it on hold through my local library. I'll keep your info. on the music in mind as I watch the film.

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Mac, thanks for all the wonderful music and videos you've shared here. I was familiar with some, especially that of Black Orpheus, but many of the musicians and singers are new to me. Thank you especially for sharing the video of Cesária Évora, what a tiny powerhouse she is!

Well, thank you, my man, for being there to enjoy it with me. It never fails, every time I see that opening scene of Black Orpheus with the little girl in a white dress dancing to help her friend, little Orfeu 'make the sun rise', my heart takes flight: you'd have to be a butterfly catcher with a net to get it back down again from the heights around Corcovado before that song is done. Luiz Bonfa collaborated with Jobim to compose it, the Samba of Orpheus, though Manhã de Carnaval ("Day in the Life of a Fool") was entirely Bonfa's own creation. This is Luiz Bonfa . . .

 
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Well, thank you, my man, for being there to enjoy it with me. It never fails, every time I see that opening scene of Black Orpheus with the little girl in a white dress dancing to help her friend, little Orfeu 'make the sun rise', my heart takes flight: you'd have to be a butterfly catcher with a net to get it back down again from the heights around Corcovado before that song is done. Luiz Bonfa collaborated with Jobim to compose it, the Samba of Orpheus, though Manhã de Carnaval ("Day in the Life of a Fool") was entirely Bonfa's own creation. This is Luiz Bonfa . . .

A vintage gem from The Mike Douglas Show: Luiz Bonfa, Edie Adams and Al Hirt. Who knew MD introduced middle-America to this level of talent (on a daily basis)? Please keep sharing these little gems as you run across them. Your description of the opening scene from Black Orpheus is nothing short of poetic . . . just out of curiosity: Do you write lyrics?

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A vintage gem from The Mike Douglas Show: Luiz Bonfa, Edie Adams and Al Hirt. Who knew MD introduced middle-America to this level of talent (on a daily basis)? Please keep sharing these little gems as you run across them. Your description of the opening scene from Black Orpheus is nothing short of poetic . . . just out of curiosity: Do you write lyrics?

Well, I guess when one is seeking to describe such poetic things as that, one can hardly miss, eh? And yet, thank you!  Oddly enough, the one little piece of verse I have written that came to some notice was also inspired by a song from a movie: La Dolce Vita, and Pérez Prado's Patricia. I entitled it, "If They Don't Play Prez Prado at My Funeral." Heh. Second Prize, annual April Poetry Contest sponsored by Barnes & Noble at the local library. 

 

 

And yes, indeed. Let's do continue sharing these delights. Judging by your taste thus far, bet you're just mad about Nino Rota as well, eh? 

 

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Today my choice for a moment in the spotlight is Martial Solal, Algerian-born, French composer, jazz musician and pianist. His career has included working with Sidney Bechet, Django Reinhardt, Toots Thieleman and many others. I might be overstating the point, but Martial Solal's contributions should be considered synonymous with one of France’s most innovative film movements. The image of Jeanne Moreau wandering the rainy streets of Paris accompanied by Miles Davis's haunting score, in Louis Malle's Elevator to the Gallows (1958), established a sublime connection between jazz and the Nouvelle Vague. However, Solal's compositions for these films were responsible for creating a "musical landscape" to match the vivid images of France's rising young directors. He was first asked by Jean-Pierre Melville to provide musical cues for his film Two Men In Manhattan (1959), which lead to his best known work on Breathless (1960) for Jean-Luc Goddard. During the decade that followed he composed the soundtracks for L'affaire d'une nuit/The Affair Of A Night (1960), directed by Henri Verneuil and Trois chambres à Manhattan/Three Rooms In Manhattan (1965), directed by Marcel Carné. Although his career in films and recording is no longer his primary focus, at the age of 87 he is still active and performs live.

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Well, I guess when one is seeking to describe such poetic things as that, one can hardly miss, eh? And yet, thank you!  Oddly enough, the one little piece of verse I have written that came to some notice was also inspired by a song from a movie: La Dolce Vita, and Pérez Prado's Patricia. I entitled it, "If They Don't Play Prez Prado at My Funeral." Heh. Second Prize, annual April Poetry Contest sponsored by Barnes & Noble at the local library.

I don't suppose you could be persuaded to share your tribute to Mr. Prado? Pérez Prado is a favorite going back many years; I was first introduced to his music in Mambo No. 5 and Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White. Every Spring when I create a new playlist, I include Cherry/Apple along with two versions of April in Paris: Basie and Dean Martin; Canteloube’s Chants D’Auvergne: both Frederica Von Stade and Dawn Upshaw singing; Love’s Illusions by Anonymous 4, with a bit of Astrud Gilberto, Françoise Hardy and anyone I think will help shake off the gray days of late winter/early spring. I suspect anything I could say about Nino Rota would read as simple reiteration (others have certainly said it better than I can). His music can invoke a childlike-wonder for his instrumental combinations, such as accordion, vibraphone and wulitzer organ, which simultaneously feel traditional and mid-century. His works are clearly of a distinctive place and time, but transcend the same with almost otherworldly results.

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I don't suppose you could be persuaded to share your tribute to Mr. Prado? Pérez Prado is a favorite going back many years; I was first introduced to his music in Mambo No. 5 and Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White.

 

Well, sure, why not? I've got it up on YouTube--with a music score--brazenly immodest show-off that I am. So, Prez is one of your main grooves, too, eh? Swell! Quite something to Google up what you can of the man's biography. And man alive, if I knew a golden opportunity when I see it, I'd go back to writing screenplays again; it's a dynamite story of hard won fabulous success to make The Benny Goodman Story kind of look like a piece of cake. Incredibly, there is no published hard copy biography on him, but did you know, for example, that because of the immensity of his band's early popularity in Cuba, the other bands left standing there looking at an empty dance floor went complaining to the musician's union which then went to the government (which I guess would have been the dictator, Batista at the time) to have the Mambo, Pérez Prado's new and unique musical invention--banned?  Yeah. And on what grounds? The Web source I read years ago omitted that detail, but I don't doubt it must have been because it was condemned as "immoral", while the Rhumba wasn't. Well, that's what forced his relocation, with the band, to Mexico City, and when the Mambo caught on there, it's like the young people had been stricken with a pandemic of joy. There were traffic jams all around the sites of their concerts. I've got some recordings on LP of those earlier original compositions of the 1940s, and man are they HOT.

 

 

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