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This is the second time I've missed recording the Ghost and Mrs. Muir.


slaytonf
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Dang.  I wonder if Captain Gregg had anything to do with it? and if it would be too much to hope TCM shows this fine picture one more time?  I was surprised and excited to see it was scheduled, and reminded myself repeatedly to record it.  Naturally, the day it was shown I forgot and came in on the last third of the movie.  Today, I remembered, and had a disk in at the ready in my DVD.  Pushed record at the appearance of the 20th Century logo--and discovered there was only an hour and fifteen minutes available on the disk.  Aaaaagh.

 

But why should I care?  It's only another movie romance--okay, with a ghost, but most of the essentials are the same.  What distinguishes this from the others, which I find uninteresting, tedious, slogs?  Because it is different.  It's yearning, aching, desolate, and entrancing.  It has a dream atmosphere that induces a trancelike state in me when I watch it.  Joseph Mankiewicz's direction is adeptly understated.  And I believe Mr. Osborne remarked on Charles Lang's cinematography.  And Bernard Hermann's score, about his lushest and most romantic, certainly contributes.  But the two elements which make this admittedly absurd story a delight to watch are the performances by Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison, and the superior writing.  The dialog never lapses into the syrupy or contrived, but always remains simple, direct, honest.

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I'm right with you slayton.

I was leaving MrTeek's when it was coming on & urged him to watch it. He scoffed at the idea of a romance between a woman & a ghost. It DOES sound silly, but it makes it all the more amazing how well the movie works. It was the first movie I recall noticing where the music and imagery moved me as well as the plot along. (waves crashing on the rocks)

 

What really strikes me is that Rex Harrison seems like such a limited actor, but he is just perfect in this difficult role (as well as Henry Higgins) as sexy ghost!

 

You can find the DVD as a "used" copy for well under $10-well worth it in my opinion. 

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I'm not a fan of Rex Harrison but his performance as the ghostly captain has always made a major contribution at pulling me into this story. Never thought he looked better either, than with that beard. Gene Tierney was very much at the peak of her beauty when she made the film, as well.

 

As others have already stated, the film's sumputous photography (those skies and crashing waves!) and Bernard Hermann's musical score add to the dreamlike quality of this romantic tale distinguished by a sense of longing and sadness. Even the "happy" ending doesn't really remove that slight sense of haunting melancholy about the production, making the film all the more poignant and memorable, I believe.

 

images3_zpse9e77db6.jpg

 

If your own longing for the film is strong enough, slaytonf, the DVD of the film is available on amazon and at a darn good price:

 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Ghost-Mrs-Muir-Gene-Tierney/dp/B000083C6R/ref=sr_1_2?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1412943975&sr=1-2&keywords=ghost+and+mrs+%2Cmuir

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Unfortunately I only had time to watch the first hour or so last night, but I was intrigued.  I'm a sucker for movies like this, but this one seemed particularly good.  This is the first time I've seen Rex Harrison  in anything where he didn't play some version of Henry Higgins.  I will definitely catch this the next time it's on.

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I've seen it several times over the years.  I have one question about it that's been nagging me for YEARS!

 

I was just "surfing" last night and happened upon it and just watched it for a small bit.  It was at the point That Harrison was dictating that story to Mrs. Miur, and she voiced her objection to the use of---"THAT word!"  He protested.  Said it was a perfectly fine word.  "It certainly means what it implies, don't you think?"  and she says, "It certainly DOES" with an air of disdain.

 

But, after all these years, I STILL don't know WHAT the word IS!

 

Any guesses?  Or can WE fill in the blank?

 

Sepiatone

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I'm not a fan of Rex Harrison but his performance as the ghostly captain has always made a major contribution at pulling me into this story. Never thought he looked better either, than with that beard. Gene Tierney was very much at the peak of her beauty when she made the film, as well.

 

As others have already stated, the film's sumputous photography (those skies and crashing waves!) and Bernard Hermann's musical score add to the dreamlike quality of this romantic tale distinguished by a sense of longing and sadness. Even the "happy" ending doesn't really remove that slight sense of haunting melancholy about the production, making the film all the more poignant and memorable, I believe.

 

images3_zpse9e77db6.jpg

 

If your own longing for the film is strong enough, slaytonf, the DVD of the film is available on amazon and at a darn good price:

 

 

 

Spoiler Alert:

 

Well I'm not sure I would call the ending (well pre-ending) a happy ending.   I found it rather sad that she remained lonely for all of those decades.  (especially a gal with looks like Gene, which I know is shallow).    Also,  she didn't even have any memories of this great love during her lonely days (a common theme in movie when a living partner dies early and the other decides to remain alone because the love was so great,   that is romantic but Muir didn't have that).

 

So one could say she remained alone mainly because of the bitterness related to how the love with the Sanders character went sour (not happy or romantic in my book).      But I do give the director and screenwriter credit for not doing the standard 'Muir moves on from the failed love affair, find an upright man,  marries,  is happy and the ghost goes and never returns' type of ending.   

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Spoiler Alert:

 

Well I'm not sure I would call the ending (well pre-ending) a happy ending.   I found it rather sad that she remained lonely for all of those decades.  (especially a gal with looks like Gene, which I know is shallow).    Also,  she didn't even have any memories of this great love during her lonely days (a common theme in movie when a living partner dies early and the other decides to remain alone because the love was so great,   that is romantic but Muir didn't have that).

 

So one could say she remained alone mainly because of the bitterness related to how the love with the Sanders character went sour (not happy or romantic in my book).      But I do give the director and screenwriter credit for not doing the standard 'Muir moves on from the failed love affair, find an upright man,  marries,  is happy and the ghost goes and never returns' type of ending.

SPOILER ALERT:

 

Well, James, I called the ending "happy" (making a point of placing that word in quotation marks) only because the two characters (now spirits) are reunited.

 

But, as I stated, it is still quite melancholy at the end. I agree, though, that terming the ending as happy (even with the quotation marks) can be legitimately questioned.

 

By the way, not that the story's emphasis is upon it, what happens to the aging housekeeper/companion (played by Edna Best) afterward? Hardly a happy ending for her. Now she is even more alone than was Mrs. Muir. Perhaps the home is willed to her.

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This movie is the only movie I ever liked Rex Harrison in.  I largely can not stand much of him in his other movies.  He wears/grates on me almost immediately but Harrison is terrific and terrific looking with his magnificent beard and wardrobe as "The Ghost".  The epitome of a ghostly ribald adventurous seaman in this role.  Love this movie!.

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SPOILER ALERT:

 

Well, James, I called the ending "happy" (making a point of placing that word in quotation marks) only because the two characters (now spirits) are reunited.

 

But, as I stated, it is still quite melancholy at the end. I agree, though, that terming the ending as happy (even with the quotation marks) can be legitimately questioned.

 

By the way, not that the story's emphasis is upon it, what happens to the aging housekeeper/companion (played by Edna Best) afterward? Hardly a happy ending for her. Now she is even more alone than was Mrs. Muir. Perhaps the home is willed to her.

 

First, I admit I missed the quotes.  So yea 'happy' as you explained it works for me.

 

Funny but while I was watching the movie I was also thinking about the housekeeper/companion at the very end.   I wondered if she was going to scream or say something like 'oh, Mrs. Muir'.   Of course that would of clashed big time with the "romantic"  ending of the sprits going away.      

 

I think last night TCM pulled off the theme concept very well.   Of course all the movies had a common theme related to sprits that were not evil but also each movie connected to the next one in ways other than just the sprit angle. 

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SPOILER ALERT:

 

Well, James, I called the ending "happy" (making a point of placing that word in quotation marks) only because the two characters (now spirits) are reunited.

 

But, as I stated, it is still quite melancholy at the end. I agree, though, that terming the ending as happy (even with the quotation marks) can be legitimately questioned.

 

By the way, not that the story's emphasis is upon it, what happens to the aging housekeeper/companion (played by Edna Best) afterward? Hardly a happy ending for her. Now she is even more alone than was Mrs. Muir. Perhaps the home is willed to her.

I always figured that Anna, Mrs. Muir's daughter and her husband would take Martha in. Mrs. Muir had already agreed to leave the house to seaman, that's what Rex wanted, he says so in the beginning.

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I like this movie and I have seen it before, but I had to catch it again last night. I had seen his Higgins and his Caesar and other roles, years before I ever saw this, and I know when I first saw this movie, I had to adjust. For a few moments, it took my brain time to get into him as a gruff, dead, sea captain. But I also loved his much earlier work with Vivien Leigh too. He's…er, I guess I want to say a bit softer in those roles?(St. Martin's Lane, Storm in a Teacup).

 

What happened last night was that I focused a bit on Natalie Wood, after seeing this movie several times before and already taking in many other great aspects of it. I had just seen a documentary on her, and I marveled at how cool her resume was. Just the variety of greats she worked with from the old Hollywood crowd as a child, and then to the big names in the 50's and 60's and later Hollywood actors. What a career and what a life!

 

So for 12 years before "Rebel" I wanted to take a look at who she worked with. And I was surprised at really how many people she worked on projects with. And believe me, there were more, but the list and this post would have been huge, so I don't have everyone.

 

Even directors, music scorers, etc. it was a lot of interesting people.

 

Ann Rutherford, Don Ameche, Frances Dee, Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent, Orson Welles, Claudette Colbert, Gene Tierney, Rex Harrison, Maureen O’Hara, Fred MacMurray, Irene Dunne, Jimmy Stewart, Ann Blyth,  Charles Laughton, Joan Blondell, Bette Davis, Bing Crosby, Jane Wyman, Jack Palance, Virginia Mayo, Paul Newman. 

 

And then I checked"Rebel" and after. And there are some old Hollywood greats in there too. I have a special love for more 30's and 40's more than anything else.

 

 James Dean, Rock Hudson, Anne Baxter, John Wayne, Karl Malden, Frank Sinatra, Tony Curtis, Gene Kelly, Robert Wagner, James Garner, Rosalind Russell, Warren Beatty, Steve McQueen, Henry Fonda, Lauren Bacall, Roddy McDowall, Robert Redford, Jack Lemmon, Vivian Vance, Sean Connery.

 

It is amazing being a child and so young, and seeing and working with the old Golden Age people, who worked in the 30's and 40's. And I am bad with dates, so there might have even been some that worked in silent early on. Then she gets older and transitions into the 50's and 60's era as the star system and Golden Age is waning, and into later times of the 70's and 80's and all that change obviously, and her career and life, unfortunately, comes to an end.

 

.

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What really strikes me is that Rex Harrison seems like such a limited actor, but he is just perfect in this difficult role (as well as Henry Higgins) as sexy ghost!

 

 

 

Yep Tiki, but I gotta say here that while watching TCM's promo of this film last week, and especially the part where Harrison says to Tierney:

 

"Confound it, madam, my language is most controlled. And as for me morals, I lived a man 's life and I'm not ashamed of it; and, I can assure you no woman's ever been the worse for knowing me - and I'd like to know how many mealy-mouthed bluenoses can say the same."

 

For Harrison to be about to say THAT(the highlighted part, especially) with a straight face, just goes to show ya how good an actor he truly WAS!!! 

 

LOL

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Yep Tiki, but I gotta say here that while watching TCM's promo of this film last week, and especially the part where Harrison says to Tierney:

 

"Confound it, madam, my language is most controlled. And as for me morals, I lived a man 's life and I'm not ashamed of it; and, I can assure you no woman's ever been the worse for knowing me - and I'd like to know how many mealy-mouthed bluenoses can say the same."

 

For Harrison to be about to say THAT(the highlighted part, especially) with a straight face, just goes to show ya how good an actor he truly WAS!!! 

 

 

Harrison would soon be an outcast from Hollywood because of the Carole Landis tragedy just around the corner when this film came out.

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Harrison would soon be an outcast from Hollywood because of the Carole Landis tragedy just around the corner when this film came out.

 

So, you're tellin' me he couldn't talk his way out o' that whole thing EVEN WITH that "oh so suave" Brit accent o' HIS????

 

(...heck, I thought that ALWAYS worked!!!) ;)

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So, you're tellin' me he couldn't talk his way out o' that whole thing EVEN WITH that "oh so suave" Brit accent o' HIS????

 

(...heck, I thought that ALWAYS worked!!!) ;)

I guess it's safe to say that Landis didn't hold the Brit accent against Sexy Rexy.

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Hey! Speakin' o' Don Knotts!

 

Anybody wanna lay odds on the idea that IF Don had had a Brit accent his movie career just might have taken off??? YOU know, like made him "more attractive"?!

 

(...naaah...then he couldn't have made a name for himself playin' a North Carolina deputy, huh....never mind...bad idea) 

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Sorry folks, but I just don't care for this movie. Too much sadness in it, especially after Mrs. Muir and the Captain began falling in love.

 

They spent too much time showing her growing old. They could have handled that with a few dissolves covering 30 years in 20 seconds, then then they should have spent more time on her and the Captain at the very end.... maybe a few minutes, maybe with both of them on one of his ships with his hands on the wheel, and the wind in her hair, and maybe her daughter and new husband looking out to sea from the house and seeing the very ship her angel-mother is on, with the daughter telling her new husband, "I like to think my mother is in heaven, sailing on a ship like that, with her own true-love, the Captain, by her side." As the camera pans down to show that the daughter is holding a copy of the book Mrs. Muir wrote about the Captain and the sea. :) (with tears and smiles).

 

By the way, the unspoken word she didn't want to type...... the Captain typed for her.... it was a 4 letter word. Use your own imigination and make up your own word.

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I guess it's safe to say that Landis didn't hold the Brit accent against Sexy Rexy.

 

Yeah, well, maybe. But I gotta say I always thought his whole "aloof" act was little off=putting.

 

(...note: I had to use that 'equal sign' up there 'cause my 'dash' key just right of the "0" key on this keyboard just stopped working for some reason...funny huh...you'd think the 'parentheses', the '!' and the '?' keys would be the first to go south on me here, wouldn't ya???!!!) 

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Sorry folks, but I just don't care for this movie. Too much sadness in it, especially after Mrs. Muir and the Captain began falling in love.

 

They spent too much time showing her growing old. They could have handled that with a few dissolves covering 30 years in 20 seconds, then then they should have spent more time on her and the Captain at the very end.... maybe a few minutes, maybe with both of them on one of his ships with his hands on the wheel, and the wind in her hair, and maybe her daughter and new husband looking out to sea from the house and seeing the very ship her angel-mother is on, with the daughter telling her new husband, "I like to think my mother is in heaven, sailing on a ship like that, with her own true-love, the Captain, by her side." As the camera pans down to show that the daughter is holding a copy of the book Mrs. Muir wrote about the Captain and the sea. :) (with tears and smiles).

 

By the way, the unspoken word she didn't want to type...... the Captain typed for her.... it was a 4 letter word. Use your own imigination and make up your own word.

 

What you recommend would have added more sadness;  The only real type of romantic love she could have was until she was DEAD.  

 

But yes,  this was a story of a very lonely women and one that after getting burned by a married man decides to give up with regards to finding love in this world (i.e. as a living person).     

 

One could say the message conveyed by the story is really out there:  If first you don't succeed,  wait until your dead.  

 

PS:  Compare that to the next movie shown;  A Guy Named Joe.  

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