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A question about a cool neurological condition


cigarjoe
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I can sometimes see B&W films in color, someone mentioned that it may be synesthezia. I never realized there was a name for it. 

 

I've been shooting lots of video clips in color for years then creating B&W film noir out of the clips. I think I've inadvertently trained my brain to assign correct colors to various shades of gray. 

 

I was watching Mildred Pierce over a year ago and in a scene with Crawford & Ann Blyth it was vivid the colors were perfect, since then, it happens randomly, briefly for different scenes, if I consciously try to control it, it goes away it's kind of cool.

 

Anybody else experience this?
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I can sometimes see B&W films in color, someone mentioned that it may be synesthezia. I never realized there was a name for it. 
 
I've been shooting lots of video clips in color for years then creating B&W film noir out of the clips. I think I've inadvertently trained my brain to assign correct colors to various shades of gray. 
 
I was watching Mildred Pierce over a year ago and in a scene with Crawford & Ann Blyth it was vivid the colors were perfect, since then, it happens randomly, briefly for different scenes, if I consciously try to control it, it goes away it's kind of cool.
 
Anybody else experience this?

 

 

Colorization is the only technical  jargon I've ever heard on the subject of converting gray scale to color.  Far as false coloring. it's known as artifacting.  My Color Computer uses this technique for creating "color" in certain modes.

 

http://atariage.com/forums/blog/105/entry-5974-color-computer-artifacting/

 

blogentry-4836-126937603894.jpg

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What was the name of that movie Jeffrey Hunter made where he was a guy who for some reason was raised in pre-war America by a Japanese family?

 

There was one scene in it where he went downstairs for his first breakfast in the Japanese house, half expecting, due to the Japanese boy's teasing him about having raw fish and eel for breakfast, finds the table l a d e n with typical "American" breakfast foods, including a stack of toasted bread with a small bowl of What can be assumed to be grape jelly.  I saw this movie at the show when it came out, and I SWEAR that even though it was a B&W movie, that JELLY was PURPLE!  I think though, that it was likely more a PSYCOLOGICAL thing than NEUROLOGIAL.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Go figure---the autocensor blanked out the word "L A D E N".  Had to come back and space it!

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cigarjoe,

 

I think you are right. I'm not sure if the colors you see will be the true colors, but they are colors and I learned years ago that COLOR IS INSIDE OUR BRAINS ONLY. Color is not in light, it does not travel through space, there are no red, blue, etc. signs or light bulbs, only different colorless frequencies of EM waves, which our brains translate into COLOR. 

 

Our eye cones are like little EM wave radio antennas, that's why they are cone shaped and the very small sizes to be tuned to light-frequency EM waves, so they can be tuned the proper length to receive the different frequencies of EM waves (short wavelengths, long wavelengths). The ELECTRICITY and CHEMICALS inside our brains transform those EM frequencies into COLOR.

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I’ve had a similar experience when investigating fine details in fuzzy 8mm films. The more I studied the film clips, the clearer they became to me, so that after a few hundred viewings, I could see things in the scenes that a “beginner” could not see.

 

Any professional who enhances security camera films and videos can see in the videos what other people can’t see. After years of experience with this work, the human brain begins to do its own enhancing automatically, but it takes a lot of experience.

 

It works like this...... who is this man??

 

Stand up and step back from your computer screen several feet, and the man will become obvious. Your brain is filling in the gaps, based on years of experience with this man’s image.

 

Dali1.jpg

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It works like this...... who is this man??


 

Dali1.jpg

 

Fred, I know who the man is (he might be referred to as number 16) because this image was on display for years in an art gallery at a (local) high end shopping mall. I worked in an office building above the mall, and every day when riding the elevator or escalator, I would watch as the woman became the face of this man.

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I can sometimes see B&W films in color, someone mentioned that it may be synesthezia. I never realized there was a name for it. 
 
I've been shooting lots of video clips in color for years then creating B&W film noir out of the clips. I think I've inadvertently trained my brain to assign correct colors to various shades of gray. 
 
I was watching Mildred Pierce over a year ago and in a scene with Crawford & Ann Blyth it was vivid the colors were perfect, since then, it happens randomly, briefly for different scenes, if I consciously try to control it, it goes away it's kind of cool.
 
Anybody else experience this?

 

 

What you experience is not synesthesia, which is a confusion of the different senses.  For instance, sound stimuli evoking colors, or scents.  The closest I can find to what you describe is chromesthesia, in which stimuli which have no color, such as numbers or words induce the perception of color.

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What you experience is not synesthesia, which is a confusion of the different senses.  For instance, sound stimuli evoking colors, or scents.  The closest I can find to what you describe is chromesthesia, in which stimuli which have no color, such as numbers or words induce the perception of color.

Thanks

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I’ve had a similar experience when investigating fine details in fuzzy 8mm films. The more I studied the film clips, the clearer they became to me, so that after a few hundred viewings, I could see things in the scenes that a “beginner” could not see.

 

Any professional who enhances security camera films and videos can see in the videos what other people can’t see. After years of experience with this work, the human brain begins to do its own enhancing automatically, but it takes a lot of experience.

 

It works like this...... who is this man??

 

Stand up and step back from your computer screen several feet, and the man will become obvious. Your brain is filling in the gaps, based on years of experience with this man’s image.

 

Dali1.jpg

Whoa.............................freaky! LSD not required! :lol:

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  • 1 month later...

I’ve had a similar experience when investigating fine details in fuzzy 8mm films. The more I studied the film clips, the clearer they became to me, so that after a few hundred viewings, I could see things in the scenes that a “beginner” could not see.

 

Any professional who enhances security camera films and videos can see in the videos what other people can’t see. After years of experience with this work, the human brain begins to do its own enhancing automatically, but it takes a lot of experience.

 

The problem here is that the brain is not always "correct." It fill in details for us, but it may mislead us. I took part in an impromptu hearing experiment several years ago, conducted by the British writer/scientist Simon Singh. He played what sounded like static to us, then asked if any of us had heard certain words. A few people said yes. Then he asked us to listen for a certain sentence, and played the static again for us. The sentence was clear as day to all of us;  but it was an error, because the sound was just static. However, our brains filled in the missing sounds because we were trying to "hear" the words. I think the same thing can happen with images.

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I noticed this go round after the apt scene, while looking at the faces, the barest hint of flesh tones, so that may be the trigger, the mind gets the flesh tone right & that triggers the whole frame to "colorize".

 

What would be interesting would be to see if I could zone in on the eye color of actors to see if the colorization actually is accurate.

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What you experience is not synesthesia, (snipped)  The closest I can find to what you describe is chromesthesia,

 

Correct.

As a professional painter & colorist I have studied the effect of color on the average viewer's brain, perception. Color is always "there", it's just every individual can perceive it differently. Years of having apprentices has taught me that. Some apprentices never "get" it exactly, and that's not anything they have control over.

 

I can somewhat discern colors in b&w film based on value (the amount of color saturation) and hue (amount of black/white) although I can often be dead wrong. My brain will "fill in" the color to the shade on the screen, but it's really only speculation.

 

It's funny when you SWEAR you SEE color in a b&w film, like the purple jelly. 

 

 

Grooves cut in pavement. Tires cause vibrations because of the grooves. Your brain turns that vibration into SOUND.

 

No, your tires going over the grooves DOES make a sound. Your brain knits the sounds together to make a song of it. It's like our brains will connect dotted lines and we will "perceive" it as a connected line ---------   .........see?

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