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CANADIAN HEROES.... hey! they look just like us!


FredCDobbs

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In today's world, where the word "hero" is bandied about too easily, it's good to see it used on someone who truly deserves it.

 

You don't KNOW the amount of anger I roused when I forwarded the opinion that all the policemen and firefighters who died when the world trade center collapsed WEREN'T heroes!

 

Or that not all of the soldier's who returned from Iraq and Afghanistan were heroes either.

 

Sepiatone

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My deepest sympathy to Canadians for the death of the young soldier, Corporal Nathan Cirillo. 

 

Kevin Vickers is truly a hero.

 

I've been so impressed by how professional the Canadian officials and politicians sound when they speak. They DON'T sound like a bunch of liars like ours do. The Canadians sound honest and professional. Ours sound like a bunch of crooked used car salesmen.

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I've been so impressed by how professional the Canadian officials and politicians sound when they speak. They DON'T sound like a bunch of liars like ours do. The Canadians sound honest and professional. Ours sound like a bunch of crooked used car salesmen.

If you were a Canadian, I doubt you would say that. Familiarity breeds contempt, and all that.

 

It was extraordinarily unusual for the Canadian Prime Minister to reach out to the two opposition leaders, as he did today in the House of Commons. I'm sure the knives will soon be out for one another once again. Politics in Ottawa has become extremely partisan in recent years, I'm afraid.

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If you were a Canadian, I doubt you would say that. Familiarity breeds contempt, and all that.

 

Maybe so.

 

I was certainly impressed with Kevin Vickers this moring, walking with his fancy uniform and ceremonial gold septer. He looked so calm and cool as he was cheered for being a hero for what he did yesterday. Man, he was a cool dude!

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Maybe so.

 

I was certainly impressed with Kevin Vickers this moring, walking with his fancy uniform and ceremonial gold septer. He looked so calm and cool as he was cheered for being a hero for what he did yesterday. Man, he was a cool dude!

He WAS impressive and should rightly be hailed as a hero. He probably saved lives by his brave action.

 

Then, again, he's not a politician.

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Maybe the Canadian pols are even slicker than ours are. Hard to believe but perhaps it's so.

 

There used to be a huge difference. Not so much anymore.

 

The Conservative Party of Canada brought in a bunch of U.S. Republican advisers about 10 years ago to show them how to win elections by any means necessary. Since then, the civilized propriety that was once taken for granted has diminished, politics getting far dirtier than ever before in Canada - and the Conservatives have benefitted. So far.

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There are many things to ponder in the wake of the recent attack on Parliament Hill. I'll try to just stick with one here.

The day the shooting happened, of course it was all over the media, all day long. At one point I switched from the Canadian station I was watching to an American one (CNN), to get an American perspective.

(Actually, I wasn't even sure the Americans would be covering it. Their news stations can be pretty inward-looking...)

 

So I get CNN, and before long they show the footage of the take -down of the gunman in the "Hall of Honour", a major corridor in Centre Block (the main Parliament building.) This is the building that at any given time would have  the most people in it, not only politicians and administrators, but the general public. It's where tourists gather and school children visit on class trips.

Normally, the visitor encounters a couple of security people at the main entrance to Centre Block. They are asked to submit any bags they're carrying and to empty their pockets, the contents of which are sent through some kind of scanner. On the other side of the scanner, the visitor has their items returned, and their visit begins. That's it, and it's always been sufficient.

 

Upon viewing the video of the gun-fire inside the main hall, the CNN journalist commented with amazement that "There are no guns at the entranceway to the Centre Block. I repeat, the security officials there are unarmed." She couldn't seem to get over this.

 

I never heard this observation from the Canadian media. Yes, they did speak of the need to review security around Parliament Hill, and sadly, guns might be introduced as a new security measure at the visitors' entrance. But I thought it was interesting that the American journalist was so astonished that our Centre Block entrance officials did not carry arms, while to most Canadians, until yesterday anyway, that was just the normal way to be.

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Sadly the world will never live in Peace, we have to get rid of the terrorists and keep the heroes.

 

If that statement weren't so sophmoric,I'd agree with it!

 

It'd be better if you had the faintest notion of how to go ABOUT such an undertaking!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Here's a photo of Kevin Vickers, the House of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms who shot the gunman in Ottawa this week. 

 

images5_zps797ce3a5.jpg

 

A true Canadian hero

 

P.S.: Thanks, RMeingast, for mentioning to me that the earlier photo of Vickers on this thread is of the wrong Kevin Vickers. And this Kevin Vickers pictured above is definitely a right guy.

 

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Tom, any thoughts on my comments regarding the lack of guns at the Visitors' Entrance to Centre Block?

If I could interject here...I think the U.S. got its wake up call in 1995 when the Murrah Federal Building was bombed in Oklahoma City.  Until 9-11-2001, it was the most tragic act of terrorism committed on American soil.  Security at many public buildings, especially those housing federal offices was beefed up.  Barriers were put in front of many of them to prevent vehicles from getting too close to the entrances.

 

About 12 years or so ago, a demented young man (about 23 years old) walked into the Illinois Capitol Building and shot and killed an unarmed security guard and wounded his co-worker.  The man then drove more than 150 miles to his hometown.  I can't even remember if he killed himself or gave up voluntarily, but it was later learned that he was supposed to be on some kind of medication and he either stopped taking it or had a bad reaction to it.  Anyway, after that incident, anyone going to the Capitol Building in Springfield who is not an employee has to go through security checks, and the guards, while still helpful to the public in directing them where they need to go, are fully armed.

 

For all the griping and back and forth people go on about whether there are too many guns or too few guns in the U.S., the uncovered story is how mentally unstable some people are.  Trying to learn about someone's medical background in this country is a bigger State Secret than anything North Korea might be hiding.  A lot of people who need help are not getting it, and far too many people care less about the issue.  As an example, I was curious about what my blood type is, since I didn't know.  I asked my doctor, and he wouldn't tell me!  Instead, he told me I'd have to go to my local hospital to get it "typed".  God help me if I ever need a transfusion, because if I'm conscious when the EMT's arrive, I'll have to play dumb if they ask me what my blood type is (which I hate to do intentionally)!

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Tom, any thoughts on my comments regarding the lack of guns at the Visitors' Entrance to Centre Block?

I actually had a conversation about this in a barber shop today, MissW. The barber was asking why there were no guns there.

 

I suspect my reply might have been typically Canadian: "Until this week, who thought they were even necessary?"

 

Just going off topic slightly, but only slightly.

 

My parents took me to the House of Commons when I was a baby in a carriage. My parents, though, somehow got lost in our Parliament building and who should come around the corner at that precise moment? John Diefenbaker who, for the benefit of our American friends reading this, later became Prime Minister of Canada.

 

Dief, seeing my parents'confusion about where they were, took on the duties of guide and showed them around the House of Commons for a few minutes. Apparently he patted me on my little flat future voter head, too.

 

I mention this because I have to wonder how many people have ever been to that building that is the governing centre of our country and had a future Prime Minister show them around. Well, I'm one of them even though (drat!)I have no memory of the experience.

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I actually had a conversation about this in a barber shop today, MissW. The barber was asking why there were no guns there.

 

I suspect my reply might have been typically Canadian: "Until this week, who thought they were even necessary?"

 

 

That's what it was like when I speak of "the good old days" of my youth in the 1940s and 50s. They weren't even necessary.

 

This is why blood, guts, and decapitations were kept out of films by the old Hays Code and off TV by the FCC Code and the NAB Code.

 

If we show enough blood and guts massacres on TV and in movies today, some borderline kids will grow up to want to imitate it.

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I guess it's odd for Americans to see the lack of armed guards, as it's par for the course in federal buildings, and maybe state and city as well, I'm not sure.  Earlier this year at an immigration office and  social security office in a non-goverment building we saw metal detectors and armed security guards.  I'm not sure when this began, but assume it's the case throughout the country.

 

 

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I guess it's odd for Americans to see the lack of armed guards, as it's par for the course in federal buildings, and maybe state and city as well, I'm not sure.  Earlier this year at an immigration office and  social security office in a non-goverment building we saw metal detectors and armed security guards.  I'm not sure when this began, but assume it's the case throughout the country.

Canada's not there yet, thank God, (not by a long shot) but in this increasingly small world of our's I've a real concern that that might not be so far away. Time will tell if this week's events prove to be a catalyst for a permanent change in Canadians' attitude towards their safety and security. Changes in our laws are clearly underway now.

 

I know that some Canadians will be willing to accept a loss of some of their freedoms if it makes them feel safer. It's a balancing act, of course, and my concern about conservative politicians (which is what we have in power now federally) is that there may be an overreaction because of this week's events.

 

There's a federal election in Canada coming next year, and I'm cynical enough (or is it realistic enough?) to believe that some politicians may exploit the recent headline grabbing events and try to create a climate of fear if they think it will be to their political advantage.

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That's what it was like when I speak of "the good old days" of my youth in the 1940s and 50s. They weren't even necessary.

 

This is why blood, guts, and decapitations were kept out of films by the old Hays Code and off TV by the FCC Code and the NAB Code.

 

If we show enough blood and guts massacres on TV and in movies today, some borderline kids will grow up to want to imitate it.

 

So Fred,  you're calling for censorship?      I admit I'm surprised by your take here;   I know that as a kid you saw many gangster films and you came out all right!   ;)

 

While today films have more violence to me the impact of action type violent video games is a larger factor.   In a video game one isn't just watching the violence but creating and participating in it. 

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