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Who was this movie star?


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I'm going to start a new series here, and I hope you help make it successful. Why? Because we all have favorite classic film artists that are not household names. So this is the perfect opportunity to share some love and recommend someone's movie work to others...are you with me?

 

I want to start with this lady:

images7.jpg

 

Who was Helen Walker?

 

From an anonymous biography at the IMDB: 

 

Helen Walker was a beautiful and bright actress whose career never reached its full potential, in spite of her evident talent. She was a successful actress on Broadway, and in 1942 her performance in the play "Jason" was so impressive that she was signed up by Paramount to act in films. She immediately earned good notices and received star billing in her film debut, LUCKY JORDAN (1942).

 

During the mid-1940s she had continued success with strong performances in offbeat but entertaining and successful films like THE MAN IN HALF MOON STREET (1945); BREWSTER’S MILLIONS (1945); and MURDER, HE SAYS (1945). Achieving both artistic and box office success, she was clearly on the brink of major stardom.

 

But all that changed on New Year's Eve of 1946 when she picked up three hitchhiking World War II veterans while driving to Los Angeles from Palm Springs, where she had been vacationing. She had a terrible accident, hitting a divider and wrecking the car, which flipped several times. One of the soldiers died and the other two were severely injured. Walker herself was seriously injured, including a broken pelvis. But her career suffered even greater and longer-lasting damage. The survivors of the accident accused her of driving drunk and speeding, and she was brought to trial.

 

She suffered bad press and faced a public that was grateful to World War II veterans for having won the war. Although she was acquitted of criminal charges, many fans turned against her and major studios were hesitant to hire her. She tried to adapt by portraying ruthless and manipulative women in dark murder mysteries, in which she again showed great talent. She performed with great aplomb in NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947); CALL NORTHSIDE 777 (1948); and IMPACT (1949).

 

By the 1950s, she was reduced to low-budget films that received little notice. After winning a minor role in THE BIG COMBO (1955) her film career ended and she only appeared in a few television shows. In 1960, she made her last television appearance, and that same year her house burned down. Some remaining friends from show business helped her, with some fellow actresses staging a benefit for her, which touched her deeply. She faded from the public view and during the 1960s she experienced health problems. In 1968, she died of cancer. She was 47 years old.

 

***

TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Helen Walker Playlist:

 

1. IMPACT (1949) with Brian Donlevy

2. LUCKY JORDAN (1942) with Alan Ladd

3. THE MAN IN HALF MOON STREET (1945) with Nils Asther

4. BREWSTER'S MILLIONS (1945) with Dennis O'Keefe

5. MY TRUE STORY (1951) with Aldo Ray

6. NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) with Tyrone Power

7. MURDER, HE SAYS (1945) with Fred MacMurray

8. THE BIG COMBO (1955) with Cornel Wilde

9. CALL NORTHSIDE 777 (1948) with James Stewart

10. CLUNY BROWN (1946) with Charles Boyer

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TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Helen Walker Playlist:

 

1. IMPACT (1949) with Brian Donlevy

2. LUCKY JORDAN (1942) with Alan Ladd

3. THE MAN IN HALF MOON STREET (1945) with Nils Asther

4. BREWSTER'S MILLIONS (1945) with Dennis O'Keefe

5. MY TRUE STORY (1951) with Aldo Ray

6. NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) with Tyrone Power

7. MURDER, HE SAYS (1945) with Fred MacMurray

8. THE BIG COMBO (1955) with Cornel Wilde

9. CALL NORTHSIDE 777 (1948) with James Stewart

10. CLUNY BROWN (1946) with Charles Boyer

 

Good choice to begin a series with, since Helen Walker is way too forgotten among all but late 40's noir fans.  My only quarrel here would be that I'd put her performance in Nightmare Alley at the top of the list.  Talk about evil dames, in that one she really took the cake.

helenwalker10.jpgDon't let that sweet and innocent look fool you...

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TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Helen Walker Playlist:

 

1. IMPACT (1949) with Brian Donlevy

2. LUCKY JORDAN (1942) with Alan Ladd

3. THE MAN IN HALF MOON STREET (1945) with Nils Asther

4. BREWSTER'S MILLIONS (1945) with Dennis O'Keefe

5. MY TRUE STORY (1951) with Aldo Ray

6. NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) with Tyrone Power

7. MURDER, HE SAYS (1945) with Fred MacMurray

8. THE BIG COMBO (1955) with Cornel Wilde

9. CALL NORTHSIDE 777 (1948) with James Stewart

10. CLUNY BROWN (1946) with Charles Boyer

 

Good choice to begin a series with, since Helen Walker is way too forgotten among all but late 40's noir fans.  My only quarrel here would be that I'd put her performance in Nightmare Alley at the top of the list.  Talk about evil dames, in that one she really took the cake.

helenwalker10.jpgDon't let that sweet and innocent look fool you...

 

Helen in Nightmare Alley took more then just the cake!    I would say she was the most evil femme fatale that didn't commit a murder.

 

I do like the concept of this thread.   I always wondered why Walker kind of just disappeared.    Now I know.  

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Helen in Nightmare Alley took more then just the cake!    I would say she was the most evil femme fatale that didn't commit a murder.

 

I do like the concept of this thread.   I always wondered why Walker kind of just disappeared.    Now I know.  

 

Thanks. I think the write-up I quoted from the IMDB is not entirely correct, however. It says that after her road accident studios were afraid to hire her, but that doesn't seem to be true. She made four films at 20th Century Fox immediately afterward, so obviously Zanuck was not afraid to put her on contract. Her screen appearances were reduced in the 50s, but that happened to a lot of actresses who came to prominence in the 40s. They were being forced off the big screen and on to television. She did make some movies during this time, and her Columbia B film MY TRUE STORY is very good. 

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The Man in Half Moon Street is my favorite mad doctor who wants to live forever film. Helen Walker gives a great performance in this oddly poignant movie. She's the woman who falls for the guy even when she learns the truth about him. One of her great performances among many.

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Helen in Nightmare Alley took more then just the cake!    I would say she was the most evil femme fatale that didn't commit a murder.

 

I do like the concept of this thread.   I always wondered why Walker kind of just disappeared.    Now I know.  

Agree 100%. She may have been the definitive femme fatale who didn't commit a murder. Stanwyck in DI may have been had more fataletude (like that word?) but she DID commit a murder.

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Thanks everyone who participated in yesterday's discussion about Helen Walker. Today I am going to rename the thread and focus on this gentleman:

 

aac8a500a1f9d01ce3e52db720c22cbf.jpg

Who was Alan Marshal?

 

Alan Marshal was an Australian-born actor who first became popular in Hollywood cinema during the late 1930s. He played leading man roles in mostly romantic dramas and comedies.  He was placed on contract by producer David Selznick, and he was Selznick’s original casting choice for the role of Rhett Butler in GONE WITH THE WIND. Imagine if that had come to pass.

 

As we know that role went to Clark Gable (who was Margaret Mitchell’s original choice for Rhett) and instead Alan Marshal was used to bolster films starring Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo and Irene Dunne. Many of his assignments were away from Selznick’s studio. He often found himself working at MGM and RKO, where Selznick had loaned him. But Marshal grew increasingly dissatisfied with the studio contract system.

 

He did not like being put into what he thought were inferior B pictures. Of course, he made just as many A pictures-- and some of his B pictures were quite good. One of the better B efforts was MARRIED AND IN LOVE (1940), which was produced at RKO and paired him with Patric Knowles.  Though one of the lesser efforts was EXILE EXPRESS (1939) with Anna Sten for poverty row studio Grand National Pictures.

 

A bit about his background: Alan Marshal was the son of actors, and early on he had developed a talent for working on stage as well. Though he was born in Australia, his parents sent him to a boarding school in New York, and he spent most of his formative years in America. When he was older he would make trips back to Australia, before Hollywood beckoned.

 

He was somewhat similar, physically, to fellow Aussie Errol Flynn, but he was less suited to action adventure parts and more suited to quiet leading man roles. One of the jobs he turned down went to Patric Knowles. Eventually, Marshal left Hollywood and returned to his first love, the theater, in the mid-1940s. He would show up on television in the 1950s and make brief comebacks in motion pictures later in the decade.

 

He died in 1961 from a heart attack while appearing on stage in Chicago with Mae West. His role in West’s play Sextette would be taken over by Timothy Dalton in the film version. Alan Marshal was married to San Francisco socialite Mary Borel until his death, and they had a son born in 1939. His son was an actor, too, and also appeared in Sextette.

 

For more, visit the alanmarshal.com website. 

 

***

TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Alan Marshal Playlist:

 

1. BRIDE BY MISTAKE (1944) with Laraine Day

2. THE WHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER (1944) with Irene Dunne

3. CONQUEST (1937) with Greta Garbo

4. TOM, DICK AND HARRY (1941) with Ginger Rogers

5. LYDIA (1940) with Merle Oberon

6. HE STAYED FOR BREAKFAST (1940) with Loretta Young

7. THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES (1939) with Basil Rathbone

8. DRAMATIC SCHOOL (1938) with Paulette Goddard

9. IRENE (1940) with Anna Neagle

10. I MET MY LOVE AGAIN (1938) with Henry Fonda

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Thanks everyone who participated in yesterday's discussion about Helen Walker. Today I am going to rename the thread and focus on this gentleman:

 

aac8a500a1f9d01ce3e52db720c22cbf.jpg

Who was Alan Marshal?

 

Alan Marshal was an Australian-born actor who first became popular in Hollywood cinema during the late 1930s. He played leading man roles in mostly romantic dramas and comedies.  He was placed on contract by producer David Selznick, and he was Selznick’s original casting choice for the role of Rhett Butler in GONE WITH THE WIND. Imagine if that had come to pass.

 

As we know that role went to Clark Gable (who was Margaret Mitchell’s original choice for Rhett) and instead Alan Marshal was used to bolster films starring Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo and Irene Dunne. Many of his assignments were away from Selznick’s studio. He often found himself working at MGM and RKO, where Selznick had loaned him. But Marshal grew increasingly dissatisfied with the studio contract system.

 

He did not like being put into what he thought were inferior B pictures. Of course, he made just as many A pictures-- and some of his B pictures were quite good. One of the better B efforts was MARRIED AND IN LOVE (1940), which was produced at RKO and paired him with Patric Knowles.  Though one of the lesser efforts was EXILE EXPRESS (1939) with Anna Sten for poverty row studio Grand National Pictures.

 

A bit about his background: Alan Marshal was the son of actors, and early on he had developed a talent for working on stage as well. Though he was born in Australia, his parents sent him to a boarding school in New York, and he spent most of his formative years in America. When he was older he would make trips back to Australia, before Hollywood beckoned.

 

He was somewhat similar, physically, to fellow Aussie Errol Flynn, but he was less suited to action adventure parts and more suited to quiet leading man roles. One of the jobs he turned down went to Patric Knowles. Eventually, Marshal left Hollywood and returned to his first love, the theater, in the mid-1940s. He would show up on television in the 1950s and make brief comebacks in motion pictures later in the decade.

 

He died in 1961 from a heart attack while appearing on stage in Chicago with Mae West. His role in West’s play Sextette would be taken over by Timothy Dalton in the film version. Alan Marshal was married to San Francisco socialite Mary Borel until his death, and they had a son born in 1939. His son was an actor, too, and also appeared in Sextette.

 

For more, visit the alanmarshal.com website. 

 

***

TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Alan Marshal Playlist:

 

1. BRIDE BY MISTAKE (1944) with Laraine Day

2. THE WHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER (1944) with Irene Dunne

3. CONQUEST (1937) with Greta Garbo

4. TOM, DICK AND HARRY (1941) with Ginger Rogers

5. LYDIA (1940) with Merle Oberon

6. HE STAYED FOR BREAKFAST (1940) with Loretta Young

7. THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES (1939) with Basil Rathbone

8. DRAMATIC SCHOOL (1938) with Paulette Goddard

9. IRENE (1940) with Anna Neagle

10. I MET MY LOVE AGAIN (1938) with Henry Fonda

Aside from Flynn and Marshal, what other classic film actors or actresses were from Australia? One of the Dames, I believe. Was it Judith Anderson?

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Aside from Flynn and Marshal, what other classic film actors or actresses were from Australia? One of the Dames, I believe. Was it Judith Anderson?

Good question. I'm not sure. One thing about Alan Marshal-- and it is explained in more detail at his website, is that he was prevented from enlisting during the war because he was not a U.S. citizen. He would have to go back to his native Australia to serve in WWII. His socialite wife didn't want him to leave, because they had a young son and apparently she wasn't willing to uproot and travel to Australia with the child. So instead, between motion picture assignments, he devoted himself to war bond drives. The U.S. government would recognize his contributions-- he raised a lot of money for the war effort.

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Aside from Flynn and Marshal, what other classic film actors or actresses were from Australia? One of the Dames, I believe. Was it Judith Anderson?

 

Chips Rafferty, an actor who often played "your typical Aussie" in many Australian, British and American films, immediately comes to mind here, DGF.

 

(...so, 'ow 'bout doin' a pace on Chips heah, mate...err I mean TB?) ;)

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Thought I would feature a German actress who first tried her luck in Hollywood in the 1950s. This lady:

imgres26.jpg

Who was Hildegarde Neff?

 

Hildegarde Neff (who used her real name Hildegard Knef back home) began her career in German cinema at the end of the second world war. One of her early films, MURDERERS AMONG US (released in 1946), made her famous with moviegoers and brought her to the attention of Hollywood producer David Selznick. Selznick wanted her to join his independent company, and at first the actress was more than willing to sign on the dotted line. But then she learned Selznick wanted her to pretend she was Austrian, something she refused to do. So for the rest of the 1940s and early 1950s she stayed away from Hollywood and kept making German films. 

 

One of her next projects would make her even more famous in Europe. It was SUNDERIN (1951). The picture was a big hit with audiences, but it brought Hildegarde a lot of criticism from officials in the Catholic Church. This was due to the fact that she had performed a very provocative nude scene. Her penance would be even more offers from producers and directors eager to work with her.

 

Soon after this, she married a German American who convinced her to try again in Hollywood. This time she signed with 20th Century Fox, and she quickly landed a supporting role in the studio's war film DECISION BEFORE DAWN (1951). This was followed by the adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO (1952). Soon other movies came her way, and she was earning good notices—especially for her turn as a spy in DIPLOMATIC COURIER with Tyrone Power. 

 

Around this time, she also appeared on Broadway in the hit musical Silk Stockings (in the part that Cyd Charisse would do in the film version at MGM). Hildegarde had definitely achieved success in America, though it would not last. Problems arose when was cast in another Ty Power film, ABANDON SHIP, because she didn't feel the part was right for her and she refused to do it. So Fox let her contract lapse, and she left Hollywood. But without missing a beat, she was back at work in more German films, as well as French, British and Italian films. 

 

When her motion picture career went into decline in the 1960s, Hildegarde reinvented herself as a successful singer. Listeners loved her trademark husky voice. But before long, she was singing lullabies, having given birth to her only child in 1968 at the age of 42. Two years later she had a successful autobiography to her credit. 

 

Next, Hildegarde took some time off to raise her daughter. She also successfully battled cancer, before she returned to movies in 1976. She would continue to work as an actress until her death. Occasionally, she would show up on American television screens. One noteworthy role was as a special guest star on an episode of CBS' Scarecrow & Mrs. King in 1984.

 

She spent the 1980s traveling and working in several countries. But she would eventually return to Germany full-time after the Berlin wall came tumbling down. And this is where she lived until she died at the age of 76 in 2002. 

 

 

***

TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Hildegarde Neff Playlist:

 

1. MURDERERS AMONG US (1946) with (German)

2. SVENGALI (1954) with Donald Wolfit (British)

3. DIPLOMATIC COURIER (1952) with Tyrone Power

4. DECISION BEFORE DAWN (1951) with Richard Basehart 

5. THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO (1952) with Gregory Peck

6. THE MAN BETWEEN (1953) with James Mason (British)

7. SUNDERIN (1951) with Gustav Frohlich (German)

8. NIGHT WITHOUT SLEEP (1952) with Linda Darnell

9. HOLIDAY FOR HENRIETTA (1952) with Dany Robin (French)

10. BLUEBEARD (1963) with Michele Morgan (French)

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Today:

1eddie.png

Who was Eddie Bracken?

 

Eddie Bracken is remembered for his roles in musicals and comedies. He first came to the attention of film audiences in RKO’s TOO MANY GIRLS, where he and Desi Arnaz recreated the roles that they had played in the Broadway version. Eddie was only 20 years old at the time, but he was poised for stardom in Hollywood. In fact, he had been performing for over a decade at this point, having started out in Vaudeville at the tender age of nine.

 

Usually, Eddie was assigned roles as a clumsy, self-effacing hero. And that is how he was best known in the films he did at Paramount in the 1940s. His Paramount contract offered him the opportunity to join Preston Sturges’ stock company, and under Sturges' direction he made his two greatest films. The first one, which paired him with Betty Hutton, was THE MIRACLE OF MORGAN’S CREEK (1944). This was followed up with HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO costarring Ella Raines, also in '44. Many years afterward, Eddie would tell Nick Clooney that he was most proud of these two films.

 

But Eddie made other films to be proud of, too. From 1940 to 1947, he appeared in sixteen pictures at Paramount. Some of the more successful ones included RAINBOW ISLAND starring Dorothy Lamour; OUT OF THIS WORLD featuring Veronica Lake and Diana Lynn; and BRING ON THE GIRLS, again with Veronica Lake.

 

By the late 1940s, Eddie began freelancing where he turned up at MGM in a supporting role in SUMMER STOCK. He also did a few pictures at Warners in the musical or comedy genres. By the mid-50s, like so many other stars his generation, he turned increasingly to television. And of course back to the stage, where he always felt most at home.

 

A few interesting facts about Eddie: he had probably the longest marriage of any Hollywood motion picture star. He and actress Anna Nickerson were wed in 1939, and the union lasted until Anna’s death in 2002, just a month shy of their 63rd anniversary. The couple had five children, and they were all on hand to celebrate the night Eddie received a Tony for his best actor performance in the 1978 revival of Hello Dolly! Eddie would continue to act on Broadway until his late seventies, and in the last years of his life he would occasionally turn up on television in charming character parts.

 

***

TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Eddie Bracken Playlist:

 

1. HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO (1944) with Ella Raines

2. THE MIRACLE OF MORGAN'S CREEK (1944) with Betty Hutton

3. THE FLEET'S IN (1942) with Dorothy Lamour

4. SUMMER STOCK (1950) with Judy Garland

5. OUT OF THIS WORLD (1945) with Veronica Lake

6. ABOUT FACE (1952) with Gordon MacRae

7. FUN ON A WEEK-END (1947) with Priscilla Lane

8. RAINBOW ISLAND (1944) with Dorothy Lamour

9. TWO TICKETS TO BROADWAY (1951) with Ann Miller

10. WE'RE NOT MARRIED (1952) with Mitzi Gaynor

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How do you rename threads?

You can go back into the original post and use the edit feature. 

 

At first I was going to just name this thread 'Who Was' or 'Who Was So & So' but that didn't seem very exciting. I thought it would be  a little better, not to mention more current, if I could just update the thread title when I add a different star to the discussion. 

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He was a very good actor who was never a main player, imo of course. He was excellent in TMOMC.

 

In addition, I don't ever remember him making an a-s-s of himself as an old actor.

 

Just a good, solid, character actor.

He had a self-titled radio program in the 1940s, so he was sometimes seen as a big enough star to be given his own show.

 

He was used by Paramount as a lead in medium budget programmers and as a second lead in big budget A films. He probably liked being in Sturges' films because he was the male lead in those. When he began to freelance, he still did leads in low-budget independent films, but at the major studios he was a second lead. By the time he turned to television, he had slipped comfortably into character parts-- though he was still doing leads on Broadway in the 1970s. 

 

I agree that he seems like he was a nice guy. I have never found one bad word about him from his former costars. In the Nick Clooney book he talks about going around to Sturges' friends in the industry and getting donations to help Sturges (who at the time was going through bankruptcy). So I would say that Eddie Bracken was a dependable soul that everyone liked.

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Today:

1paula.png

Who was Paula Raymond?

 

Paula Raymond’s life was an interesting one. She was from a wealthy San Francisco family, and her initial plan was to become a lawyer like her father. But her great beauty would instead lead her into modeling jobs and with that, to be noticed by powerful people in Hollywood.

 

Her career in the motion picture capital began on a lark when she was a young teen visiting Los Angeles. She was suddenly cast in a Jane Withers film at Fox, under her family name Paula Rae Wright. The experience was a good one for Paula, and though she went back to high school and on to college to study law, she still wondered what it would be like to work full-time in the movies.

 

Those dreams would have to wait, though. The second world war was in full swing, and she found herself married to a military captain and quickly after that, the mother of a new daughter. When the marriage ended two years later, Paula decided to leave San Francisco and go to Hollywood to pursue a career in acting.

 

She was quickly signed by Paramount but put in a series of bit parts-- most were so insignificant, she was not credited. When Paramount dropped her, she hopped over to Columbia, and it was there that she received more screen time and better assignments. She would gain experience working in B films and western programmers. She also did a live television drama for Hal Roach Studios, and this led to George Cukor seeing her and casting her in a small part in ADAM’S RIB at MGM.

 

Immediately, she was signed by MGM and groomed for stardom. By 1950, she was appearing in a variety of movies, some of them A films. She had the chance to work alongside some of the studio’s top talents—both in front of and behind the camera. She made a name for herself in films like DEVIL’S DOORWAY with Robert Taylor (which was directed by Anthony Mann); CRISIS with Cary Grant (directed by Richard Brooks); and THE TALL TARGET with Dick Powell (also directed by Anthony Mann).

 

Unfortunately, her momentum at MGM did not last. They would let her go in 1953, and she wound up freelancing after this. The next phase of her career wasn’t bad, though, and she made some of her more memorable pictures—THE BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS at Warners; THE HUMAN JUNGLE for Allied Artists; and a personal favorite of Paula’s, THE GUN THAT WON THE WEST back at her old stomping grounds Columbia.

 

Eventually, movie parts dried up and she decided to go back to college. However, this time she did not study law. Instead, Paula earned a degree at USC in cinematography. But she did not have a chance to work as a cinematographer, because it was now the golden age of television, and she found that she was very much in demand as a guest star on many hit shows of the era. In fact, she would appear on 47 different TV programs from 1954 to 1964.

 

One job was a very important one for Paula. In 1953 she appeared in the swashbuckler BANDITS OF CORSICA, where her costar was Raymond Burr. She and Burr developed a close friendship, and a few years later when she was working primarily in television, he invited her to do Perry Mason five times. In 1962, she was in a serious car crash and barely survived. She was forced to undergo plastic surgery to reconstruct part of her face, and Burr’s show was the first one she did a year and a half later when she ready to go back to work.

 

Her perseverance, beauty and delightful personality would continue to be her calling card for the next few decades. In later years, when she appeared at film festivals and even when she was in and out of a nursing home, she would entertain listeners with wonderful stories about old Hollywood.

 

For some of Paula’s fabulous stories, here's an interview she gave:

 

http://www.westernclippings.com/interview/paularaymond_interview.shtml

 

***

TopBilled's Most Definite Very Truly Essential Paula Raymond Playlist:

 

1.     THE TALL TARGET (1951) with Dick Powell

2.     DEVIL’S DOORWAY (1950) with Robert Taylor

3.     THE BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS (1953) with Paul Christian

4.     CRISIS (1950) with Cary Grant

5.     GROUNDS FOR MARRIAGE (1951) with Van Johnson

6.     THE GUN THAT WON THE WEST (1955) with Dennis Morgan

7.     DUCHESS OF IDAHO (1950) with Esther Williams

8.     BANDITS OF CORSICA (1953) with Richard Greene

9.     THE HUMAN JUNGLE (1954) with Gary Merrill

10.   CHALLENGE OF THE RANGE (1949) with Charles Starrett

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She sure was!  Did you read the interview? I thought her comments about Ida Lupino were rather interesting.

no, never cared much for ida lupino. cecil kellaway played a priest in joan of arc which was on last nite. what the hell is ward bond doin' in that thing? :)

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