Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I guess it's the popularity level of a belief that's important.

I guess it's the popularity level of a belief that's important.

I guess it's the popularity level of a belief that's important.

I didn't know how to interpret 'popularity level...that's important"

Link to post
Share on other sites

The level of bigotry expressed by his "Just being honest" is not really going to be accepted without a challenge. Any explanations for the roots of his prejudice don't excuse his choice to remain so in 2014, when clearly many are changing their previous held less tolerent

beliefs. That he is not among them yet is unfortunate.

Exactly.

Imagine if someone had said that they didn't "dare" watch  Montgomery Clift's movies in the past because they had heard that he was Jewish.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly.

Imagine if someone had said that they didn't "dare" watch  Montgomery Clift's movies in the past because they had heard that he was Jewish.  

 

"JEWISH"???!!! Now THAT'S a WHOLE other kettle of (gefilte) fish THERE, boy!!!

 

Well, it SURE is a good thing I've never heard any of THIS kind'a talk about my boy Groucho, or else there'd just be NO way I could still enjoy his and his two brothers(one who I think is eye-talian) antics at that there opera as much ever again!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Was it common knowledge in Hollywood that Clift was gay? How about with the public? For Hudson, it was Hollywood-Yes. Public-No.

 

I don't think it was common knowledge that Clift was gay, I believe I read in Patricia Bosworth's biography of him that he was bisexual.  He had affairs with women and men; though I think later in life he was involved with men more so than women.  I imagine that some of his close friends like Elizabeth Taylor, Kevin McCarthy and Rock Hudson may have known; but had too much respect for their friend to invade his privacy by telling people.  I read that he struggled a lot with his sexual identity, which may have been a factor for his substance abuse problems.  Clift wasn't into the Hollywood scene and shunned the media, so there might not have been much known about him at the time. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly.

Imagine if someone had said that they didn't "dare" watch  Montgomery Clift's movies in the past because they had heard that he was Jewish.  

 

Of course there are people that don't watch certain actors because of their race, religion (or their lack of one),  their political views etc... We have seen a few make comments at this site (but mostly related to politics;  e.g.  those that will not watch a film with Jane Fonda)    Typically I see no reason to challange them for their POV because their post is enough of an embarrassment (even if they don't realize it!).  

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't know how to interpret 'popularity level...that's important"

 

It means that if your belief is in accordance with that held by a majority, you'll be less criticized for it whether that belief is solidly founded in true morality or not. But when the vagaries of public convention shift your belief to a minority-held one, you'll be much more vulnerable to vilification for it - again whether the belief is founded in one's sense of morality or not.

 

So, it's very much a numbers game in regards to the comfort one has in expressing what one feels or has felt.

 

Your point that in 2014 his admission of how he used to feel about Clift is unacceptable and inexcusable just reminded me of how important it can be to express certain beliefs at certain times, depending on how the wind is blowing.

 

It was really just a passing thought - I probably should have kept it to myself (would've saved me all this extra typing and I am pretty lazy).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Many have said that Clift would have been better as the latent homosexual Maj. Weldon Penderton in 'Reflections in a Golden Eye' (1967) principally because he could've related more. I disagree with this - I believe Brando was perfect in the role.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Many have said that Clift would have been better as the latent homosexual Maj. Weldon Penderton in 'Reflections in a Golden Eye' (1967) principally because he could've related more. I disagree with this - I believe Brando was perfect in the role.

 

I suspect Clift would have found that role too close to home.

I agree that Brando was outstanding in that role.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect Clift would have found that role too close to home.

I agree that Brando was outstanding in that role.

Montgomery Clift HAD accepted doing this role with Liz; he hadn't been offered anything in a couple of years, or at least, he hadn't done.anything. Taylor and Burton.had tried to come up with a project.all three could do, the latter even suggesting a remake of Hemingway's THE MACOMBER AFFAIR. Liz was shocked by Monty's appearance around this time, even announcing to the press that if he didn't work he would die. With RIAGE, the producers.did not want him, because he was uninsurable due to substance.abuse, among other things. Of course, so was Liz, due mostly to her propensity for accidents and illnesses. Well Liz forced the issue,.announcing to the press.that she.and.Monty would be doing the film. She mollifed the producers by saying she would put up her million dollar salary to insure him. Alas, Clift suffered a fatal heart attack before filming started.

 

Burton turned.down doing the role,.as did Robert.Mitchum, I believe. Brando was delighted to do it. I think he was a better choice.than Monty, because his.masculine.countenance helped to convey the army officer having to suppress his sexuality quite believably.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course there are people that don't watch certain actors because of their race, religion (or their lack of one),  their political views etc... We have seen a few make comments at this site (but mostly related to politics;  e.g.  those that will not watch a film with Jane Fonda)    Typically I see no reason to challange them for their POV because their post is enough of an embarrassment (even if they don't realize it!).

 

My personal burden (though your point is very well taken) is that I WANT them to realize it!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...

I must be the only one here that doesn't find him fragile or ethereal, in fact masculinity is one of his most perceptible qualities probably why both men and women loved him. I don't really believe his bi/homosexuality is what caused his unhappiness.  I listen to what his close friends and family have said and everything points to the fact that he was unsure, unfulfilled and disillusioned by his career.  The thing he loved most killed him.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my top 5 cowboy movies (ahem, pardon me) Westerns is "Red River". Montgomery Clift is so slight and understated compared to big, blustering John Wayne but steals every scene he is in. This movie had to be filmed outdoors just to make room for all that immense, quiet charisma. And (pardon me, again) he exudes sexiness from every pore.  His natural acting style must have been quite a revelation in 1948. 

red-river-1.jpg?w=300&h=1831468679918-054-montgomery-clift-theredli

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LilyoftheValley said:

One of my top 5 cowboy movies (ahem, pardon me) Westerns is "Red River". Montgomery Clift is so slight and understated compared to big, blustering John Wayne but steals every scene he is in. This movie had to be filmed outdoors just to make room for all that immense, quiet charisma. And (pardon me, again) he exudes sexiness from every pore.  His natural acting style must have been quite a revelation in 1948. 

red-river-1.jpg?w=300&h=1831468679918-054-montgomery-clift-theredli

I love RED RIVER, he and Wayne certainly played off each other well. Clift does turn in quite a natural performance as well and holds his own against the Duke, which must have been difficult.

He was charming, if unscrupulous as the would-be-suitor of Catherine (Olivia de Havilland) in THE HEIRESS....you really want to believe he's sincere in his love for her, because it's Clift, it has to be so, but yet Clift manages to convey that shiftiness in his character that you can't really blame Catherine for not willing to risk being taken in again. Maybe Clift's character would have made her happy, on the other hand, he could have ended up cheating on her time and time again and bled her dry of her fortune. I think it's a marvel to Clift's acting ability that he has you rooting for and yet being suspicious of him at the same time.

And while he might not have as much of a showy role as Elizabeth Taylor and Katharine Hepburn in SUDDENLY, LAST SUMMER, he still turned in a fine performance as the psychiatrist who ends up wanting to help save poor Elizabeth from the clutches of her nasty aunt.

He was dynamite in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, and while JUDGMENT AT NUREMBERG isn't up there on my list of favorites, he is completely believable. 

To tell you the truth I think I actually prefer Clift to Dean and Brando (fine actors that they are). It's so tragic that the car accident severely affected Clift up until the time of his death.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...