Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

It's time for commericals on TCM to save the channel


Recommended Posts

I stated that before and missed a major point. TCM is owned by Turner which is part of Time Warner as in Time Warner Cable. They want you to keep cable for this channel. They know 80% of channels are watched by probably 5% of subscribers.

 

 

It is my understanding that Time Warner Inc. divested itself of Time Warner Cable Inc. in 2009.

 

They are separate and distinct companies and no person sits on the Board of Directors of both.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, ever onward.  That's a great motto, but it needs to be in Latin.  Is there anyone who can translate that?

 

Perhaps appropriate to your thought:

Ad eundum quo nemo ante iit.

(To boldly go where no man has gone before)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is my understanding that Time Warner Inc. divested itself of Time Warner Cable Inc. in 2009.

 

They are separate and distinct companies and no person sits on the Board of Directors of both.

Don't members of boards of directors ever stand up while performing their duties?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't post anymore but after reading this thread and the news in regard to the budget cuts that are occurring at TCM I'm filled with questions. None can be answered until Turner Broadcasting announces their plans for the channel but it all makes me terribly sad.

My cable company did not add Turner Classic Movies to their lineup until the fall of 2006. I was not able to view the channel in it's infancy like most of you but, nonetheless, for the past eight years it has been an oasis for me. I truly would be lost without it.

 

 

As far as fading away I hope not, TopBilled.  Hopefully some of our questions will be answered during the Classic Cruise this year.

 

MovieGal:

 

First of all I am sorry to hear you do not post anymore. Your presence here is needed!

 

Now as far as what Helen and Top have written, I am not so sure that the supposed cuts being made by TCM spurred on by their corporate parent will have as dire results as TopBilled has explained in his post. I have worked for several large corporations and when there have been cutbacks or even the elimination of entire departments, others step up to take on more responsibility. This is true with smaller corporations and or companies.

 

It is called getting by with less and working with the staff you have. Now maybe TCM has lost their entire PR staff. I do not know this to be sure, but lets say they did. What does this mean ultimately?

 

It could mean that instead of having their own staff to provide PR services, TCM will go out and replace their old staff by hiring an outside firm to provide those services. Lets face it, probably the number one reason why TCM's PR department was eliminated (if Helen is right) was budget reasons. And I do not know just how many folks worked in their PR department, but lets say that there were ten?

 

Well that is ten salaries, plus ten health care plans, plus ten savings plans, and ten vacation plans. That adds up to a lot of partially paid benefits and more importantly, salaries. TCM could possibly go out and hire an outside firm to handle the PR chores, thereby saving those internal costs and using some of those savings to increase their PR efforts.

 

It is just a guess and or a theory on my part, but this is why corporations get rid of certain people and then save money by hiring outside resources. This happens all the time in the advertising industry.

 

If indeed the entire PR department was eliminated, I feel very sorry for those people losing their jobs. But the were talented people working under what I believe was a terribly financed operation, especially considering TCM does not air commercials. But hopefully they will be able to find other jobs and maybe, just maybe, TCM will somehow figure out a way to continue providing for those PR events/programming as they have done in the past.

 

The way most things happen around here is that whenever there is a rumor about something or that whenever anything is announced either for the good but mostly for the worse, suspicion and paranoia rear their ugly heads. My feeling is this:

 

Lets just wait and see what announcement is made about impending cutbacks and see what TCM will have plans for... that is IF they announce anything.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This conversation maybe moot, in terms of cable vs. streaming.   The home entertainment market is in a state of flux, not unlike cable's introduction in the late '70s/early '80s.  Streaming has seriously eroded enough of the market that telecommunications is rethinking it all again.  

 

HBO has seen the light.  Mine is but a small voice, but I hope TCM just starts transition from cable to streaming.  The feedback from sales is once the buyer has a AppleTV/Roku/Chromecast device, they start cancelling the cable.  And these devices sell at a relatively painless price once the technology jumps again for upgrading.  Comcast and Time Warner have held on too long to their old model and technology.  Even the oldsters like me are abandoning them.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This conversation maybe moot, in terms of cable vs. streaming.   The home entertainment market is in a state of flux, not unlike cable's introduction in the late '70s/early '80s.  Streaming has seriously eroded enough of the market that telecommunications is rethinking it all again.  

 

HBO has seen the light.  Mine is but a small voice, but I hope TCM just starts transition from cable to streaming.  The feedback from sales is once the buyer has a AppleTV/Roku/Chromecast device, they start cancelling the cable.  And these devices sell at a relatively painless price once the technology jumps again for upgrading.  Comcast and Time Warner have held on too long to their old model and technology.  Even the oldsters like me are abandoning them.

Well said, Casablanca100views. Gone are my days of rushing to tape all the wonderful classically classic movies TCM showed, and boy did they show them! No more. Now if I get one or two good days in a week, I feel like a junkyard dog who is thrown a bone.

 

Worst part (or best part) is: I no longer care. TCM can devolve into whatever it is they are devolving into, and the apologists can defend them to the hilt. I no longer care. Don't get me wrong, I'm sorry to see it, but so it goes.

 

I agree on the modem device. I finally signed up for ACORN, but am waiting for them to get their app into Amazon, so I can get the Fire TV.

 

Finally, it looks like I will get my wish - FIOS will finally realize their stranglehold and price gouging days are over, and they will suffer, thanks to all the customers who didn't grow up with the Cablevision and Verizon monopoly abandon cable companies. I couldn't be happier.

 

Now, if only people would stop buying 1.5 quarts of whey and air **** ice cream that used to taste like real ice cream and came in half gallons. Too much to hope for. :D

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Worst part (or best part) is: I no longer care. TCM can devolve into whatever it is they are devolving into, and the apologists can defend them to the hilt. I no longer care. Don't get me wrong, I'm sorry to see it, but so it goes.

 

Good post. These are the kinds of comments that TCM execs, living in their little funnel cloud over Kansas, need to read. Right, Dorothy?

imgres32.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This conversation maybe moot, in terms of cable vs. streaming.   The home entertainment market is in a state of flux, not unlike cable's introduction in the late '70s/early '80s.  Streaming has seriously eroded enough of the market that telecommunications is rethinking it all again.  

 

HBO has seen the light.  Mine is but a small voice, but I hope TCM just starts transition from cable to streaming.  The feedback from sales is once the buyer has a AppleTV/Roku/Chromecast device, they start cancelling the cable.  And these devices sell at a relatively painless price once the technology jumps again for upgrading.  Comcast and Time Warner have held on too long to their old model and technology.  Even the oldsters like me are abandoning them.

 

Clearly the industry is in a state of flux and new business models will pop up and replace older ones.   The daily delivered newpaper is one its way out and cable as we know it today is too.     What is difficult to predict is what the cost to the consumer will be for the alteratives.    e.g.  are people really getting 'per buck value' from their cell phones over the price they use to pay for their land line phones?    Of course there are a lot of 'depends' involved.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Now maybe TCM has lost their entire PR staff. 
 
It could mean that instead of having their own staff to provide PR services, TCM will go out and replace their old staff by hiring an outside firm to provide those services.

 

It is my understanding that several Turner channels share facilities and staff for activities for which it is impractical for each channel to have their own dedicated operation. It is my guess that TCM losing its dedicated PR staff indicates that all PR duties are being consolidated into a department which will serve several channels simultaneously.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

TCM can devolve into whatever it is they are devolving into, and the apologists can defend them to the hilt. 

 

I hope that I have never been included under the 'apologist' category. I have attempted on occasion to show how fear-mongers and hand-wringers were distorting facts or presenting unfounded opinions as facts.

 

I have at all times steadfastly maintained that TCM is a business. Businesses generate profit by providing goods and services for which customers will pay. TCM has a lock on a profitable niche market. I doubt that any competent management would make substantial changes to its on-air presentation because that would put it at risk of loss of customers/audience.

 

I feel that the announcement that TCM will discontinue original programming is a good thing. The special presentations are often interesting but they do subtract from the time which can be allotted to movies. I believe that the discontinuation indicates that management is cutting costs in a manner which will not affect the airing of movies. I believe that the discontinuation indicates also that they have no plans to emulate AMC by introducing their own shows which would displace movies.

 

I believe that this period of flux/transition is the greatest risk posed to date to traditional TCM programming and operations.

 

I hope dearly that it survives substantially unchanged.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope that I have never been included under the 'apologist' category. I have attempted on occasion to show how fear-mongers and hand-wringers were distorting facts or presenting unfounded opinions as facts.

 

I have at all times steadfastly maintained that TCM is a business. Businesses generate profit by providing goods and services for which customers will pay. TCM has a lock on a profitable niche market. I doubt that any competent management would make substantial changes to its on-air presentation because that would put it at risk of loss of customers/audience.

 

I feel that the announcement that TCM will discontinue original programming is a good thing. The special presentations are often interesting but they do subtract from the time which can be allotted to movies. I believe that the discontinuation indicates that management is cutting costs in a manner which will not affect the airing of movies. I believe that the discontinuation indicates also that they have no plans to emulate AMC by introducing their own shows which would displace movies.

 

I believe that this period of flux/transition is the greatest risk posed to date to traditional TCM programming and operations.

 

I hope dearly that it survives substantially unchanged.What is this mo

 

Can you be specific and define this "niche market"?  (and please don't say 'classic movies' because that isn't specific).

 

I only ask because one of the key issues debated here is the percentage of studio-era (1930 - 1968) movies TCM should show.   Therefore if the 'niche market' is viewers interested in a station that shows mostly studio-era (1930 - 1968) movies,  I question how large of a market that is.  Is it enough of a market for a station like TCM to continue to exist?   I don't know. 

 

The so called apologist are those unwilling to admit that TCM is no longer focused on studio-era movies (with the latest evidence by the anti-apologist being the February schedule).     If TCM has indeed changed to me that indicates that TCM no longer believes there are enough studio-era viewers to support the station.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The so called apologist are those unwilling to admit that TCM is no longer focused on studio-era movies (with the latest evidence by the anti-apologist being the February schedule).     If TCM has indeed changed to me that indicates that TCM no longer believes there are enough studio-era viewers to support the station.

 

This is, and always has been, the mission of TCM, as stated by Robert Osborne at the very beginning of the very first show:

 

Hi, welcome to Turner Classic Movies. I'm Robert Osborne, I'm gonna be your host, right here, as we present some of the best, the--finest films ever made, twenty-four hours a day. We're going to be drawing not only from the great film libraries of MGM and Warner Brothers, but also from other outstanding catalogs, so: Come join us, and see not only great films and stars from the past, but also films from recent years, featuring some of our newest and most watchable stars (Emphasis mine).

 

TCM is doing today exactly what it always has done.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is, and always has been, the mission of TCM, as stated by Robert Osborne at the very beginning of the very first show:

 

Hi, welcome to Turner Classic Movies. I'm Robert Osborne, I'm gonna be your host, right here, as we present some of the best, the--finest films ever made, twenty-four hours a day. We're going to be drawing not only from the great film libraries of MGM and Warner Brothers, but also from other outstanding catalogs, so: Come join us, and see not only great films and stars from the past, but also films from recent years, featuring some of our newest and most watchable stars (Emphasis mine).

 

TCM is doing today exactly what it always has done.

 

Yes,  I know that.   I have used this many times myself when I'm called an apologist,  but I don't see how that addresses anything I asked.   

 

What I asked is the concern by the anti-apologist of more and more movies from recent years.    Not SOME moves from recent years but a lot higher percentage of movies from recent years.     

 

So again the question was;  are there enough viewers to keep TCM in the black as the percentage of studio-era movies goes DOWN while the percentage of post studio-era movies goes UP (assuming this is the case as made by the anti-apologist). 

 

Loyal viewers want to know!   ;)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes,  I know that.   I have used this many times myself when I'm called an apologist,  but I don't see how that addresses anything I asked.   

 

What I asked is the concern by the anti-apologist of more and more movies from recent years.    Not SOME moves from recent years but a lot higher percentage of movies from recent years.     

 

So again the question was;  are there enough viewers to keep TCM in the black as the percentage of studio-era movies goes DOWN while the percentage of post studio-era movies goes UP (assuming this is the case as made by the anti-apologist). 

 

Loyal viewers want to know!   ;)

Good post, james. I like how you are willing to look at both sides of the issue, which quite frankly is more than others who fall back on quoting the same old Tabesh and Osborne statements time and again. At some point Osborne will be dead and gone and they will still be quoting him as if he is speaking those words to us eternally from the grave.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good post, james. I like how you are willing to look at both sides of the issue, which quite frankly is more than others who fall back on quoting the same old Tabesh and Osborne statements time and again. At some point Osborne will be dead and gone and they will still be quoting him as if he is speaking those words to us eternally from the grave.

Yes, it is a good post. But no one has the answer, that's the sad part. The bogus statistics from the apologists are bunk.

 

This question has been in rotation for YEARS now - the best part is that it gets in a twist the knickers of all the red faced apoplectic apologists, and if there's anything I love to do online and in real life :D it's to get the knickers in a twist of those who can't handle the truth.

 

And I do it so well. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is, and always has been, the mission of TCM, as stated by Robert Osborne at the very beginning of the very first show:

 

Hi, welcome to Turner Classic Movies. I'm Robert Osborne, I'm gonna be your host, right here, as we present some of the best, the--finest films ever made, twenty-four hours a day. We're going to be drawing not only from the great film libraries of MGM and Warner Brothers, but also from other outstanding catalogs, so: Come join us, and see not only great films and stars from the past, but also films from recent years, featuring some of our newest and most watchable stars (Emphasis mine).

 

TCM is doing today exactly what it always has done.

Been hypocritical?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think not. Osborne said drawing from other catalogs. when was the last time tcm drew anything from the K. Gordon Murray mexican import "catalog"? not recently I

 

You misquoted Osborne.   He said other outstanding categories.     

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is, and always has been, the mission of TCM, as stated by Robert Osborne at the very beginning of the very first show:

 

Hi, welcome to Turner Classic Movies. I'm Robert Osborne, I'm gonna be your host, right here, as we present some of the best, the--finest films ever made, twenty-four hours a day. We're going to be drawing not only from the great film libraries of MGM and Warner Brothers, but also from other outstanding catalogs, so: Come join us, and see not only great films and stars from the past, but also films from recent years, featuring some of our newest and most watchable stars (Emphasis mine).

 

TCM is doing today exactly what it always has done.

I think not. Osborne said drawing from other catalogs. when was the last time tcm drew anything from the K. Gordon Murray mexican import "catalog"? not recently I can tell you that. when was the last time tcm aired El Vampiro starring German Robles which was released before Hammer's Dracula in 1958. Have Osborne and tcm programmers even heard of Chubasco-Azteca Studios? ain't my idea of drawing from other catalogs. No sir, it is not. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...