Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
slaytonf

That's a nice car!

Recommended Posts

Highway Patrol is back on MeTV at 5(?) AM weekdays.  It's not Law and Order, but is a pretty good show to watch.  I have the DVD's and it is one of the ones to watch to kill a half hour to an hour.  Nothing against Broderick Crawford, but definitely not the guy who won an Oscar for All the King's Men.

William Boyett is also interesting.  He was one of the guys who showed up a cops a lot.  He also had a frequently recurring role in Adam 12.

While the HP cars (Dodges & Buicks) are interesting, I've always liked all the Chrysler Corp. products that show up.  Dodges, Plymouths and De Sotos. 

Amusing that the bad guys were knocking over businesses and other things for $50 to $100 takes and then drive off in a $3,000 to $4,000 (1957ish price) car.  And mostly convertibles, but that was probably for the filming.

 

Never found any info. on it but I think Chrysler did a lot to get its cars into TV and movies in the 50's and 60's. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Highway Patrol is back on MeTV at 5(?) AM weekdays.  It's not Law and Order, but is a pretty good show to watch.  I have the DVD's and it is one of the ones to watch to kill a half hour to an hour.  Nothing against Broderick Crawford, but definitely not the guy who won an Oscar for All the King's Men.

William Boyett is also interesting.  He was one of the guys who showed up a cops a lot.  He also had a frequently recurring role in Adam 12.

While the HP cars (Dodges & Buicks) are interesting, I've always liked all the Chrysler Corp. products that show up.  Dodges, Plymouths and De Sotos. 

Amusing that the bad guys were knocking over businesses and other things for $50 to $100 takes and then drive off in a $3,000 to $4,000 (1957ish price) car.  And mostly convertibles, but that was probably for the filming.

 

Never found any info. on it but I think Chrysler did a lot to get its cars into TV and movies in the 50's and 60's. 

 

I recall Stuart Whitman(no, no relation to the famous yodeler of course) being a regular on Highway Patrol also, Cid.

 

And yeah, I did seem as if there were an inordinately high percentage of MOPAR vehicles on TV shows back then, didn't it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And seeing as how this thread has now been resurrected...

 

And while the following isn't about a car featured on film or TV(sorry slayton), I thought all my fellow gearheads here might find this interesting.

 

This is a Jaguar factory-built electric E-Type...

 

jaguar-e-type-zero-promo.jpg

Here's the link: https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/jaguars-electric-e-type-zero-is-an-engineering-marvel/

 

(...pretty cool, huh...although I can't imagine this baby costing less than $200K if they decide to produce it in any kind of volume)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sho' 'nuff Darg.  Been seeing a LOT of Mopar metal on both "Leave It To Beaver" and "Perry Mason" recently too.  Although MASON seemed over the years, to switch back and forth between Chrysler and Ford.

 

And since that Jaguar E-type has long been a favorite of mine, I'd go into hock OVER MY HEAD to get any  one.  New electric model or classic '60's.  Don't matter to me.  Sexiest looking sports car ever!

 

When DECADES was playing their BURKE'S LAW  "binge" this past weekend, the last one they showed was when HONEY WEST was introduced to audiences.  And she was driving a white Jaguar .

 

For the "Honey West" series for some reason, it was switched to that cool AC COBRA.

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sho' 'nuff Darg.  Been seeing a LOT of Mopar metal on both "Leave It To Beaver" and "Perry Mason" recently too.  Although MASON seemed over the years, to switch back and forth between Chrysler and Ford.

 

And since that Jaguar E-type has long been a favorite of mine, I'd go into hock OVER MY HEAD to get any  one.  New electric model or classic '60's.  Don't matter to me.  Sexiest looking sports car ever!

 

When DECADES was playing their BURKE'S LAW  "binge" this past weekend, the last one they showed was when HONEY WEST was introduced to audiences.  And she was driving a white Jaguar .

 

For the "Honey West" series for some reason, it was switched to that cool AC COBRA.

 

 

Sepiatone

I almost ordered an E Type before I left Vietnam in 71.  Fortunately I didn't as my home was 2 hours from the dealership and the cars were very trouble prone.  Worked with a guy once in mid-70's that owned a late 60's one.  It was semi-permanently garaged as no one could find the brake components he needed - including the dealership and distributors in Atlanta.  Think it took about six months to get them from England and on the car.

Then the Lucas electrical system was the worst.

But, probably most beautiful car ever made.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

While the HP cars (Dodges & Buicks) are interesting, I've always liked all the Chrysler Corp. products that show up.  Dodges, Plymouths and De Sotos. 

Amusing that the bad guys were knocking over businesses and other things for $50 to $100 takes and then drive off in a $3,000 to $4,000 (1957ish price) car.  And mostly convertibles, but that was probably for the filming.

 

Got any pics you can post?

 

And seeing as how this thread has now been resurrected...

 

And while the following isn't about a car featured on film or TV(sorry slayton), I thought all my fellow gearheads here might find this interesting.

 

This is a Jaguar factory-built electric E-Type...

 

jaguar-e-type-zero-promo.jpg

Here's the link: https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/jaguars-electric-e-type-zero-is-an-engineering-marvel/

 

 

 

"I never died, said he."

 

And Dargo, you don't have to give any excuse to show pics of that car!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

, I've always liked all the Chrysler Corp. products that show up.  Dodges, Plymouths and De Sotos. 

Amusing that the bad guys were knocking over businesses and other things for $50 to $100 takes and then drive off in a $3,000 to $4,000 (1957ish price) car.  And mostly convertibles, but that was probably for the filming.

 

When I consider that the first car I  ever bought "new" from a dealership in 1975 was UNDER $4,000 in price I gotta wonder why they needed to rob businesses in the first place.  Probably to meet the monthly car notes.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amusing that the bad guys were knocking over businesses and other things for $50 to $100 takes and then drive off in a $3,000 to $4,000 (1957ish price) car. 

 

 

I believe that it may be that it was at that time considered gauche to flee a robbery on foot and so they stole a vehicle for their getaway. It would be natural for them to steal the best available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that it may be that it was at that time considered gauche to flee a robbery on foot and so they stole a vehicle for their getaway. It would be natural for them to steal the best available.

While some were stolen, most were their own vehicles or at least it appears that way.

I think it is more that Chrysler Corporation thought it better marketing to showcase their most expensive models.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got any pics you can post?

 

 

Not good at that, but typically would be 55-57 Chrysler, Plymouth, De Soto and Dodges.  Many convertibles which were usually second most expensive car for a brand.  Ironically, most expensive was usually a station wagon-higher cost to manufacture and low sales.

Lots of De Sotos, but by late 50's Chrysler Corp was having problems with sales of the brand - it was gone by 61.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not good at that, but typically would be 55-57 Chrysler, Plymouth, De Soto and Dodges.  Many convertibles which were usually second most expensive car for a brand.  Ironically, most expensive was usually a station wagon-higher cost to manufacture and low sales.

Lots of De Sotos, but by late 50's Chrysler Corp was having problems with sales of the brand - it was gone by 61.

 

Yep Cid, not even the hawking of the DeSotos on television for years by THIS guy would save the marque...

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

;)

 

Btw, here's one of my all-time favorite Virgil Exner "Forward Look" designs from that era...the 1957 DeSoto Fireflite...

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

(...since I was a kid, I've always loved the look of those three taillights sticking out of each of those tail fins on the DeSotos)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep Cid, not even the hawking of the DeSotos on television for years by THIS guy would save the marque...

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

;)

 

Btw, here's one of my all-time favorite Virgil Exner "Forward Look" designs from that era...the 1957 DeSoto Fireflite...

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

(...since I was a kid, I've always loved the look of those three taillights sticking out of each of those tail fins on the DeSotos)

des58red.jpgThis is my favorite car.  '58 De Soto Fireflite Sportsman.  The front was a little more restrained for late 50's De Soto's.  The triple taillights were what separated De Soto's from rest of Chrysler Corp cars.

BTW, my posting image is a '56 Chrysler New Yorker St. Regis which may be a tie for favorite.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Btw, here's one of my all-time favorite Virgil Exner "Forward Look" designs from that era...the 1957 DeSoto Fireflite...

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

(...since I was a kid, I've always loved the look of those three taillights sticking out of each of those tail fins on the DeSotos)

 

 

Now I know where those sunglasses come from :

 

eccd7c745a4b1cd1e96a4daf0fcc3547--cat-ey

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I know where those sunglasses come from :

 

eccd7c745a4b1cd1e96a4daf0fcc3547--cat-ey

 

LOL

 

Yep, those WOULD seem the perfect fashion accessory for any blonde beehive-hairstyled bombshell who might be riding shotgun while you're tooling around in that DeSoto, huh slayton.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And what a difference one year makes!

 

I remember in the summer of '67 a friend of mine spent that whole summer trying to restore a '56 DeSoto, and it was a HUGE design difference.

 

 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And what a difference one year makes!

 

I remember in the summer of '67 a friend of mine spent that whole summer trying to restore a '56 DeSoto, and it was a HUGE design difference.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

The '55 and '56 models for all Chrysler Corp products were dramatically changed over the previous ones.  It was called the Forward Look.  Really put a scare into GM and Ford.

The '57 models were the expansion of Virgil Exner's designs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1935 Auburn 851 Phaeton Sedan, in Swing Time (1936):

i125520.jpg

The winter convertible option.

Say, what does phaeton mean, anyway?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, slaytonf said:

1935 Auburn 851 Phaeton Sedan, in Swing Time (1936):

i125520.jpg

The winter convertible option.

Say, what does phaeton mean, anyway?

I've long wondered that too.  So I got this from WIKI:

 

A Phaeton (also Phaéton) was a form of sporty open carriage popular in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Drawn by one or two horses, a phaeton typically featured a minimal very lightly sprung body atop four extravagantly large wheels. With open seating, it was both fast and dangerous, giving rise to its name, drawn from the mythical Phaëton, son of Helios, who nearly set the earth on fire while attempting to drive the chariot of the sun.

With the advent of the automobile, the term was adapted to open touring cars, also known as phaetons.

Hope this helps. ;)

Sepiatone

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This the 58 Mercury Montclair 4 door Phaeton.  The top did not come off.  Mercury was looking for a name to distinguish it from other cars in the line, so they stuck Phaeton on it.

Automobile companies are notorious for changing the way car type names are used.  Most interesting now is the use of "sedan" for some two door cars.  Sedan has traditionally meant a four door car.

 

Image result for 1950's Mercury Phaeton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

 

Hope this helps. ;)

Sepiatone

Yesitdoes. 

So it's that Phaeton.  Wonder why it didn't click.  I also wonder why carmakers--and originally carriage makers--would want that image associated with their products.  Unless their target market was people with a death wish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, TheCid said:

This the 58 Mercury Montclair 4 door Phaeton.  The top did not come off.  Mercury was looking for a name to distinguish it from other cars in the line, so they stuck Phaeton on it.

Automobile companies are notorious for changing the way car type names are used.  Most interesting now is the use of "sedan" for some two door cars.  Sedan has traditionally meant a four door car.

 

Image result for 1950's Mercury Phaeton

Cid, I believe the whole "Two-door Sedan" nomenclature came about in the early-'50s, and was Detroit's way to differentiate that model of car with a solid B-pillar from its most often slightly more up-market and higher priced "Two-door Hardtop" model, and with the latter of course having no B-pillar.

(...but yeah, you would think the word "Coupe" probably would have still sufficed regardless, huh)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Car makers are a bit indecisive when it comes to that sort of thing.  It differs from Co. to co. though.  Likely depending on whose nephew has the most clout at any time. ;)

I worked at the CADILLAC division of GM (main Clark St. plant) and remember for a couple of years before it was launched, the SEVILLE was at first supposed to be given the name La SALLE.  Don't know why that idea was changed though.

Plus a LOT of cars (especially Cadillacs) with the "BROUGHAM" tag slapped on them never in the last half of the 20th century ever resembled the Brougham type carriage they were supposedly named for.  I'm guessing someone on the board thought it sounded classy enough to use. ;)

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Dargo said:

Cid, I believe the whole "Two-door Sedan" nomenclature came about in the early-'50s, and was Detroit's way to differentiate that model of car with a solid B-pillar from its most often slightly more up-market and higher priced "Two-door Hardtop" model, and with the latter of course having no B-pillar.

(...but yeah, you would think the word "Coupe" probably would have still sufficed regardless, huh)

The hardtop nomenclature originally began as hardtop convertible.  It gave the appearance of a convertible with the top up, but the top did not come down.  Industry later shortened it to hardtop which came to mean a car without the "B" pillar. 

Ford did have the Skyliner hardtop convertible in 57 and 58, but that is another story.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...