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That's a nice car!


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3 hours ago, slaytonf said:

You anticipated all my questions about it.

But one thing occurs to me.  Why is it that no futuristic prototype cars ever look like the cars that actually get built later on?  The same is true for futuristic cars in movies.

In most cases it would be due to the sheer economics of producing such an out-of-the-ordinary car like the Futura up there, and which would have such a small potential customer base that the costs of tooling up to make them alone would never be recouped by the company. 

And what primarily contributes to cars such as this having such a small potential customer base would be some of the impractical for daily use features the designers of them offered up for consideration, and such in the cases of the two most recently shown concept cars up there, their bubble tops which would have made driving them uncomfortably warm during hot sunny days.

 

 

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3 hours ago, slaytonf said:

You anticipated all my questions about it.

But one thing occurs to me.  Why is it that no futuristic prototype cars ever look like the cars that actually get built later on?  The same is true for futuristic cars in movies.

Because people would not purchase them, at least not more than a few.  The manufacturers produced cars that were expected to sell in the hundreds of thousand and hopefully millions.  American car taste evolve over time.

The show cars were to attract people to car shows to see what they could actually purchase.  Also to demonstrate some of the new ideas they had that may actually end up on production cars.  But nothing that resembled a show car or its interior.  Most of these cars were essentially hand built and not amenable to normal manufacturing.  So, only a very few, very wealthy people could afford them anyway.

Many of them were not even practical for normal use.  Some did not even have engines, drive trains and so forth.

In mid-30's, Chrysler produced the Airflow models for Chrysler and De Soto.  Major disappointment in sales so within a few years that came back to cars that looked more like what Ford and GM were producing.

 

image.jpeg.1970cfbebba38212d899cf98ac048c83.jpeg

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30 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

How many remember THIS car being such a big deal?....

Sepiatone

Oh this car has

Such big fins dear 

And they flow up

To the sky

;)

(...yep Sepia, I've seen this car written up in magazines before, but that was many years ago...and so thanks for posting this)

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

Oh this car has

Such big fins dear 

And they flow up

To the sky

 Mack Heath habt ein Miata

Und das Miata sieht man nicht.

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

And what primarily contributes to cars such as this having such a small potential customer base would be some of the impractical for daily use features the designers of them offered up for consideration, and such in the cases of the two most recently shown concept cars up there, their bubble tops which would have made driving them uncomfortably warm during hot sunny days.

 

2 hours ago, TheCid said:

Many of them were not even practical for normal use.  Some did not even have engines, drive trains and so forth.

Seems like they would be more properly called mis-concept cars.

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5 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

 Mack Heath habt ein Miata

Und das Miata sieht man nicht.

LOL

Herr Brecht would have been proud of ya here, slayton ol' boy!

(...I'd have said this in German, but I don't know the language very well)

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1 minute ago, slaytonf said:

Viel danken.

Yeah! I hear Mercedes will soon be coming out with this very model within the next few months, in fact. 

(...hmmm...or was that BMW)

;)

 

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1 hour ago, slaytonf said:

 

Seems like they would be more properly called mis-concept cars.

I think the phrase comes from the engineers and/or designers come up with concepts of what they like.  Then management OK's them spending lots of money to build them.  Although mis-concept is not a bad term either.

1 hour ago, Dargo said:

LOL

Herr Brecht would have been proud of ya here, slayton ol' boy!

(...I'd have said this in German, but I don't know the language very well)

What are Y'all discussing.  Sounds interesting.  As for Miata (the car), the new Fiat 124 is based on the Mazda Miata, but using Fiat drive train.

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40 minutes ago, TheCid said:

I think the phrase comes from the engineers and/or designers come up with concepts of what they like.  Then management OK's them spending lots of money to build them.  Although mis-concept is not a bad term either.

What are Y'all discussing.  Sounds interesting.  As for Miata (the car), the new Fiat 124 is based on the Mazda Miata, but using Fiat drive train.

Slayton was just cleverly referencing the origins of Bobby's big 1959 hit recording of course, Cid.

And re these newer Fiat 124 Spiders...

A buddy of mine back in L.A. purchased one a couple of years ago, the higher performance Abarth edition. He let me drive it a bit when I was out there last year, and was very impressed with it.

(...and yeah, I thought Fiat did an excellent job of incorporating many of the design cues of the original 124 Spiders like you and I had back in the day)

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The Threepenny Opera, written by Bertolt Brecht, based on an earlier work called The Beggar's Opera, with songs by Kurt Weill, one of the universe's great gifts to music.  It's the story of a notorious criminal and murderer who gets what he deserves:  at the end he's made a baron.  "The Ballad of Mack the Knife" was translated into English and made into a hit by--well who didn't cover it?  The most famous cover, I suppose was by Bobby Darin.  Here it is:

 

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So, does anyone recall the brand name of the WAX that had a small photo of the car on it's container?  

I keep thinking it was GLASS WAX, but I have no proof of this....

Sepiatone

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1926 Duesenberg Model A bodied in 1934 by Bud Lyons in After Office Hours (1935):

5d69e4285f34589ba4d11e73f9dbddfb.jpg

The car in the movie was black, but there wasn't a good pic of it.

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20 hours ago, slaytonf said:

1926 Duesenberg Model A bodied in 1934 by Bud Lyons in After Office Hours (1935):

5d69e4285f34589ba4d11e73f9dbddfb.jpg

The car in the movie was black, but there wasn't a good pic of it.

Yep slayton, it's definitely not the sharpest shot you'll ever see, but here's the shot of the Duesenberg in the IMCDb website for this film anyway...

i001168883.jpg

(...oh and btw...I posted this here NOT so much to show this beautiful car again, but really more just to say that thanks to YOU, I've had a damn earworm of "Mack the Knife" playin' in my head this whole past week, and it's only today when I've noticed this FINALLY starting to subside!!!)  😠

LOL

 

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5 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

Was it Bobby, Louis, Frank, or Ella singing?

Oh, it was Bobby's big  1959 hit recording version, alright!

(...and for some odd reason which I can't explain,  especially the line "Ooh, Miss Lotte Lenya and old Lucy Brown..Oh, the line forms on the right, babe..Now that Macky's back in town"!)

 

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On 3/21/2020 at 8:22 PM, slaytonf said:

The Threepenny Opera, written by Bertolt Brecht, based on an earlier work called The Beggar's Opera, with songs by Kurt Weill, one of the universe's great gifts to music.  It's the story of a notorious criminal and murderer who gets what he deserves:  at the end he's made a baron.  "The Ballad of Mack the Knife" was translated into English and made into a hit by--well who didn't cover it?  The most famous cover, I suppose was by Bobby Darin.  Here it is:

 

My favorite renditions of the song is the Max Raabe version sung in original Deutsch.

 

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2 hours ago, Sukhov said:

Jaguar driven by Franco Nero in a Quiet Place in the Country (1969). I thought this one looked cool.

i233401.jpg

A 1959 Jaguar XK 150, according to IMCDB.  Jaguars are overall, the most beautiful cars, though for the last 15 years or so, not so much.

Good movie btw.

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Just watched a 1951 MGM Cartoon: Car of Tomorrow.  Most entertaining thing was that many of the cars and features were related to actual cars or features or names for features on cars being sold in late 40's-early 50's.

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