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That's a nice car!


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3 hours ago, slaytonf said:

The Z cars.  Proof that there's no brilliant car concept that a corporation with concerted effort can't destroy.

Yeah, I know what you're sayin' here, slayton. The original early Z cars were styled beautifully with graceful curves, however would grow less so as the years progressed, and especially so around the C-pillar area and the front fascia.

And another example of this sort of thing would be the Jaguar E-type, with the early Series-1 models being the most beautiful.

(...however and in defense of the companies that would produce these cars, don't forget that just a few years into their runs, Federal safety crash standards would become implemented within the industry, and thus unfortunately resulting in their less graceful looking appearances in order to meet those standards)

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15 hours ago, Dargo said:

And now, seen in the following shot from the 1978 film Every Which Way But Loose, are two of my favorite cars when I was a young man in the 1970s, and in fact they still are to this day...

i065159.jpg

A 1973 Datsun 240Z and a 1973 Porsche 914.

(...note the price on the used car lot for each of them back in 1978...Datsun Z's in excellent condition today are going in the $25K-$40K range, and 914's also in excellent shape today for around $20K-$30K)

 

 Dargo, I'm guessing you were no stranger to Ventura Boulevard, west of Van Nuys Blvd., where the PORSCHEs were hustled... This screenshot, though, looks like a capture of that car lot on Van Nuys Blvd. that eventually became the address of a BURGER KING. If so, you can also see the lot during the night drive in TARGETS (1968) - adjacent to  Corky's, a now-defunct Googie restaurant that is an occasional sighting in movies.

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17 hours ago, Dargo said:

And now, seen in the following shot from the 1978 film Every Which Way But Loose, are two of my favorite cars when I was a young man in the 1970s, and in fact they still are to this day...

i065159.jpg

A 1973 Datsun 240Z and a 1973 Porsche 914.

(...note the price on the used car lot for each of them back in 1978...Datsun Z's in excellent condition today are going in the $25K-$40K range, and 914's also in excellent shape today for around $20K-$30K)

 

I returned from Vietnam in Aug. 1971 and needed a car.  Looked at several and the Z was one.  The situation was it was sold by a dealer 2 hours away, you could take a ride in his personal Z, but you could not test drive it.  If you wanted one you could put your name on the waiting list (3 months) and take whatever came in at full price.  If you declined you went to bottom of waiting list.  Also, dealers were tending to load them up with all kinds of extras to boost the prices.  Ended up with a '71 Dodge Challenger.

In 1984 I purchased a 300ZX with Datsun on one side and Nissan on other side of rear end.  Nice car, but many criticized it as not being a true sports car because it had more luxury and comfort features.  IMO, an improvement.   In 1988 I traded it in on a Mazda RX-7 because I wanted a convertible.

13 hours ago, slaytonf said:

The Z cars.  Proof that there's no brilliant car concept that a corporation with concerted effort can't destroy.

What have they destroyed in the Z car?  Just curious.

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1 hour ago, NoShear said:

 Dargo, I'm guessing you were no stranger to Ventura Boulevard, west of Van Nuys Blvd., where the PORSCHEs were hustled... This screenshot, though, looks like a capture of that car lot on Van Nuys Blvd. that eventually became the address of a BURGER KING. If so, you can also see the lot during the night drive in TARGETS (1968) - adjacent to  Corky's, a now-defunct Googie restaurant that is an occasional sighting in movies.

During that time, no actually NoShear, I wasn't all that familiar with the San Fernando Valley. You see, I was a South Bay boy who seldom ever ventured over the Sepulveda Pass, and whose activities were primarily restricted to the L.A. basin.  

It wouldn't be until the mid-'90s when I'd become more familiar with the SFV and after meeting a fellow motorcycle enthusiast at the Laguna Seca Racetrack up in the Monterey/Salinas area, and who resides in Bell Canyon. We'd become best friends, and I'd occasionally ride up to his house there. Phil has a beautiful collection of 25 classic motorcycles which are all museum quality.

And re the Googie style of restaurants, in my neck of the woods, perhaps the most famous for being in a movie would be the Hawthorne Grill that Tarantino used in Pulp Fiction here...

hawthorne_grill.jpg

34892.jpg

(...and which no longer exists, either)

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31 minutes ago, ElCid said:

I returned from Vietnam in Aug. 1971 and needed a car.  Looked at several and the Z was one.  The situation was it was sold by a dealer 2 hours away, you could take a ride in his personal Z, but you could not test drive it.  If you wanted one you could put your name on the waiting list (3 months) and take whatever came in at full price.  If you declined you went to bottom of waiting list.  Also, dealers were tending to load them up with all kinds of extras to boost the prices.  Ended up with a '71 Dodge Challenger.

In 1984 I purchased a 300ZX with Datsun on one side and Nissan on other side of rear end.  Nice car, but many criticized it as not being a true sports car because it had more luxury and comfort features.  IMO, an improvement.   In 1988 I traded it in on a Mazda RX-7 because I wanted a convertible.

What have they destroyed in the Z car?  Just curious.

Yep, upon their initial release and for a few years afterward, Datsun Z's would become so popular that the dealerships wouldn't haggle at all. I mean, here you had a fairly reasonably priced sports car that was much more reliable and much more modern in engineering and design than anything the Brits could offer the public. Not to mention how beautiful they were.

It was a similar situation (to put it in motorcycling terms) as how when Honda came out with their OHC four-cylinder, disc brake equipped, electric start CB750 in 1969,  it pretty much was the beginning of the end for the British motorcycle industry.

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8 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep, upon their initial release and for a few years afterward, Datsun Z's would become so popular that the dealerships wouldn't haggle at all. I mean, here you had a fairly reasonably priced sports car that was much more reliable and much more modern in engineering and design than anything the Brits could offer the public. Not to mention how beautiful they were.

It was a similar situation (to put it in motorcycling terms) as how when Honda came out with their OHC four-cylinder, disc brake equipped, electric start CB750 in 1969,  it pretty much was the beginning of the end for the British motorcycle industry.

I have one of those British sports cars, but a newer vintage.  It has a Toyota engine in it...

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1 minute ago, txfilmfan said:

I have one of those British sports cars, but a newer vintage.  It has a Toyota engine in it...

Lotus Elise, perhaps???

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3 hours ago, Dargo said:

 "...I was a South Bay boy..."

 Here's a lost South Bay site you might have had a connection with, Dargo... 

 When I played high school water polo, the South Bay Tourney was then held at Aviation High in Redondo Beach. Interestingly, the school was already closed by the time they filmed FATAL GAMES (1984) there. Like many a swimming pool of my youth, Aviation High's eventually got the fill-in:

     http://t-location-scout.blogspot.com/2012/06/fatal-games-1984.html                                                                                                                             



                                                                                            

 

 

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28 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 Here's a lost South Bay site you might have had a connection with, Dargo... 

 When I played high school water polo, the South Bay Tourney was then held at Aviation High in Redondo Beach. Interestingly, the school was already closed by the time they filmed FATAL GAMES (1984) there. Like many a swimming pool of my youth, Aviation High's eventually got the fill-in:

     http://t-location-scout.blogspot.com/2012/06/fatal-games-1984.html                                                                                                                             



                                                                                           

Yep, I remember the old Aviation High School very well, NoShear. It was located only 2 or 3 miles from my childhood home, and just about the same distance from where my wife and I purchased a home in 1991.

There's a TCM board member who occasionally posts by the name of "Stephan" who graduated from that high school in the early '70s. Haven't seen him for a while around here, though.

Part of that site is now the Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center which opened in the early-'90s as I recall.

(...when my wife and I still resided in the area, we saw a few plays put on there such as a revival of 'Oklahoma', 'The Music Man' and 'Smokey Joe's Cafe')

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22 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep, I remember the old Aviation High School very well, NoShear. It was located only 2 or 3 miles from my childhood home, and just about the same distance from where my wife and I purchased a home in 1991.

There's a TCM board member who occasionally posts by the name of "Stephen" who graduated from that high school in the early '70s. Haven't seen him for a while around here, though.

Part of that site is now the Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center which opened in the early-'90s as I recall.

(...when my wife and I still resided in the area, we saw a few plays put on there such as a revival of 'Oklahoma', 'The Music Man' and 'Smokey Joe's Cafe')

 I guess you did have a connection! 😁 How about the Triangle Shopping Center? The FLEETWOOD was located there - where Penelope Spheeris shot three of the bands for the following film:

     

 

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24 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 I guess you did have a connection! 😁 How about the Triangle Shopping Center? The FLEETWOOD was located there - where Penelope Spheeris shot three of the bands for the following film:

     

 

Which is on the TCM schedule Saturday night

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35 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 I guess you did have a connection! 😁 How about the Triangle Shopping Center? The FLEETWOOD was located there - where Penelope Spheeris shot three of the bands for the following:

     

 

Would you be referring to the Triangle Shopping Center that was (and still may be) located in Redondo Beach along PCH?

And if so, then no, I don't remember any club named The Fleetwood being there. 

I do however vaguely  remember seeing some movies at the then nearby grand old Redondo Beach Fox Theater before it was razed in the early-'70.

fox1.jpg

(...and for some reason I particularly and distinctly remember watching Gidget Goes Hawaiian inside it when I was about 9...don't know why...Deborah Walley never did a thing for me) 

 

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20 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Which is on the TCM schedule Saturday night

 Thank you for pointing out, txfilmfan - WOW: The Kids Are Alright (1979) is the Five O'Clock Talk (PST)!

 The Kids Are Alright, THE DECLINE of western civilization...

 Tell me: I'm actually scheduled to ZOOM the commentary this Saturday night, but TCM is just late informing me - right?

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21 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Would you be referring to the Triangle Shopping Center that was (and still may be) located in Redondo Beach along PCH?

And if so, then no, I don't remember any club named The Fleetwood being there. 

I do however vaguely  remember seeing some movies at the then nearby grand old Redondo Beach Fox Theater before it was razed in the early-'70.

fox1.jpg

(...and for some reason I particularly and distinctly remember watching Gidget Goes Hawaiian inside it when I was about 9...don't know why...Deborah Walley never did a thing for me) 

 

 Yes, Dargo. It was located on Harbor Drive but since razed.  The FLEETWOOD may have been a J.J. Newberry Co originally... 

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46 minutes ago, Dargo said:

 "...

fox1.jpg

(...and for some reason I particularly and distinctly remember watching Gidget Goes Hawaiian inside it when I was about 9...don't know why...Deborah Walley never did a thing for me)"

 That was an appropriate venue for a beach flick!

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Would you be referring to the Triangle Shopping Center that was (and still may be) located in Redondo Beach along PCH?

And if so, then no, I don't remember any club named The Fleetwood being there. 

I do however vaguely  remember seeing some movies at the then nearby grand old Redondo Beach Fox Theater before it was razed in the early-'70.

fox1.jpg

(...and for some reason I particularly and distinctly remember watching Gidget Goes Hawaiian inside it when I was about 9...don't know why...Deborah Walley never did a thing for me) 

 

..Deborah Walley as Gidget was only OK,   but I have seen Deborah Walley on a few T.V.  shows and she was really something.  

E.g.  Wagon Train and Kung Fu (where she played an artist \ model and wore carpi pants like Laura Petrie).    

John McIntire,Deborah Walley 'wagon train' tv show by slr1238 on DeviantArt

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  • 3 weeks later...

Of course, all the discussion about Miss Rigg has got me watching The Avengers.  There's a whole slew of early seasons with Ian Hendry, Julie Stevens, Honor Blackman, etc on the Internet Archive.  Video and sound are mediocre, but there sometimes are nice cars, like this 1960 AC Greyhound in "The Sell-Out":

i221947.jpg

(Hm, looks like the photo came out a little squashed side-to-side, I'll look for another pic.)

1960_ac_greyhound_by_aya_wavedancer_dd9h

There, that's better.

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  • 1 month later...

I'm new to this site , and haven't read lots of these threads, but I've been watching old movies and TV shows for many years, since TCM was new and I had cable. I just wondered if anyone else tries to identify automobiles on the screen. Cars can, or should, have starring credits in some movies. One that comes to mind quickly is, Topper.  That custom bodied, supercharged Cord roadster, Cary Grant smashed, and Topper had fixed. Does anyone else out there follow the backgrounds to try to I.D. cars for make , model and year? I've seen the movies often enough to be able to search the backgrounds without loosing the enjoyment of the picture.  Maybe this could become a trivia game thread, possibly driven by someone more suited to the task than I.

 

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Welcome to the (running)boards here, muck. (ain't I clever) 

As Tex here just mentioned, one of our older model (there I go again) regular contributors "slaytonf" started a thread with your suggestion here a few years back, and so yeah, check that one out, but please don't be just a tire-kicker and stick around for a while.

(...yep, there's no stoppin' me when I'm on a roll)  ;)

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Well, OK , I just read about 5 pages of that 27 or so pages of that '14 thread, I guess this is old stuff and none to interesting. I'm goin' back to read the rest and callin' it over. thanks for the link!

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Hey! don't crash out so quick!  I'm always interested in what people get jazzed about in movies.  They are an endless source of fascination, and other people's enthusiasm contributes to mine.  I'll also turn you on to a valuable website.  It's the Internet Movie Car Database, or IMCDB.org.  It has for all but the most obscure movies, exhaustive identifications of all moving vehicles (except trains and planes, I think).  That's what I rely on when I'm watching a movie and something rolls across the screen and I say:  Hey! that's a nice car! 

Next time that happens to you, post it.  I'd like to know what you think is a nice car.

2014?  Six years?  Omigosh.

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13 hours ago, muck said:

I'm new to this site , and haven't read lots of these threads, but I've been watching old movies and TV shows for many years, since TCM was new and I had cable. I just wondered if anyone else tries to identify automobiles on the screen. Cars can, or should, have starring credits in some movies. One that comes to mind quickly is, Topper.  That custom bodied, supercharged Cord roadster, Cary Grant smashed, and Topper had fixed. Does anyone else out there follow the backgrounds to try to I.D. cars for make , model and year? I've seen the movies often enough to be able to search the backgrounds without loosing the enjoyment of the picture.  Maybe this could become a trivia game thread, possibly driven by someone more suited to the task than I.

 

Found this about the Topper car.  I have often heard it referred to as mostly a Buick.  And welcome to the forum.

https://www.recordonline.com/article/20150330/NEWS/150339939  As for Topper’s car, it was indeed at the time the most famous movie car ever to hit the screen. It was actually a 1936 Buick Chrysler ... yes, a combination of the two cars built by Pasadena Coachbuilders Bohman and Schwartz. Built specifically to be featured in the “Topper” movie for the “always out for a good time” ghosts, it did include as you note styling cues from Cord (exhausts) and Graham (shark-like front end), along with Buick and Chrysler styling.

After the movie, Mobil Gas purchased the roadster and had Bohman and Schwartz do some updates to the body. They re-christened the car “The Gilmore Special,” and later the “Mobilgas Special.” Mobil owned Gilmore, and fans of A.J. Foyt will quickly recognize the name Gilmore, as the company sponsored many of his championship Indy cars.

Originally built on a 1936 “Straight-8” Buick chassis, the car received Chrysler underpinnings in 1954, including Bohman re-fitting the body and interior on a new 1954 Chrysler Imperial chassis powered by a 235-horse Chrysler Hemi V-8.

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