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That's a nice car!


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14 hours ago, ElCid said:

Think I mentioned before that I had one of these, '78, red of course.  Kept it almost four years until it began to snap the clutch cable every every 5-6,000 miles or so.  Dealer never could figure out what was wrong and Fiat was essentially gone from US by then.  Replaced the clutch and clutch pedal and everything between.  Nice car otherwise.

Yep, I know we've discussed our Fiat Spiders before here, Cid. Yours being the opposite color combo of my '77, and with mine being Black (exterior) over Red (interior).

(...and I think I also mentioned to you that I removed those big gawdawful post-'73 model year federally-mandated bumpers and fitted the early model bumpers like the ones on Faye Dunaway's car up there instead...I also replaced the stock 13in wheels with Panasport 14in ones) 

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

But like you said Janet, not that particular color of blue/green called "Frost Turquoise" I posted a pic of earlier, eh?!

So as you recall, would the Mustang's color in your locale perhaps be a brighter or darker color than that one, or maybe more greenish than bluish?

(...heck, we'll get to the bottom of this YET!)  ;)

It's darker than that pretty car you posted. More green than blue, like I said. You better go out and get yourself a giant box of Crayolas and find the blue/green crayon. That's the color of this car.

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11 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yep, I know we've discussed our Fiat Spiders before here, Cid. Yours being the opposite color combo of my '77, and with mine being Black (exterior) over Red (interior).

(...and I think I also mentioned to you that I removed those big gawdawful post-'73 model year federally-mandated bumpers and fitted the early model bumpers like the ones on Faye Dunaway's car up there instead...I also replaced the stock 13in wheels with Panasport 14in ones) 

Mine looked like below, except I had the wire wheel covers.   Didn't really have a problem with  the bumpers.  At one point I was stopped at a traffic light and kid behind me got anxious and hit my back bumper at an angle.  It went in, but did not come back out.  So, called PD so could file for insurance.  Took it to dealer and they played with it and ordered the shock absorber.  In the process of playing with it, the shock came back out to normal so I never did get it fixed.

1978 Fiat 124 Spider for sale on BaT Auctions - sold for $6,400 on November  24, 2017 (Lot #7,026) | Bring a Trailer

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Hey, that's a nice car!        So are the shock-abs. spring loaded? Like springs inside clickey pens, or slow like hydraulic spring shocks on the suspension? I never had to investigate the "innards" of these, even though I've worked on cars most of my life. It just seemed funny I don't know about how these work.

     B.T.W. , I recently saw Ed Begley and Harry Belafonte crammed into an Austin- Healy roadster, quite cool, and swoopy compared to E.B.'s mopar sedan,(de soto?). Chit chat about an upcoming bank-job might have been easier filmed in in the huge ,comparatively roomy dark sedan. Any thoughts about filming inside one car compared to another?

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2 hours ago, muck said:

...Any thoughts about filming inside one car compared to another?

Uh-huh, I've got one here, muck...

1*sqCCotY17D8ZSaSFHB2guA.jpeg

"So Charley, tell me here Brother. When did dey start puttin' dese venetian blinds in the back wind'a o' dese taxi cabs? Okay, and now where was I here? Oh yeah...I could'a been a contender."

;)

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15 hours ago, muck said:

Hey, that's a nice car!        So are the shock-abs. spring loaded? Like springs inside clickey pens, or slow like hydraulic spring shocks on the suspension? I never had to investigate the "innards" of these, even though I've worked on cars most of my life. It just seemed funny I don't know about how these work.

     B.T.W. , I recently saw Ed Begley and Harry Belafonte crammed into an Austin- Healy roadster, quite cool, and swoopy compared to E.B.'s mopar sedan,(de soto?). Chit chat about an upcoming bank-job might have been easier filmed in in the huge ,comparatively roomy dark sedan. Any thoughts about filming inside one car compared to another?

As best I can remember, they were probably hydraulic.  That's what they looked like from the outside from underneath the car.  Ideally, they would have sprung back into position after a light tap, but because I was hit at an angle and only one went in, it got hung up.  Part of the 5 MPH no damage rule.

12 hours ago, slaytonf said:

 

What's the point here?  Sorry, I must be missing something or just not getting it.  Unless this is in regards to the second part of Muck's post.

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16 hours ago, muck said:

Hey, that's a nice car!        So are the shock-abs. spring loaded? Like springs inside clickey pens, or slow like hydraulic spring shocks on the suspension? I never had to investigate the "innards" of these, even though I've worked on cars most of my life. It just seemed funny I don't know about how these work.

 

I believe that they vary from make to make and model to model. Some are springs and some are hydraulic and some incorporate both.

The only ones of which I have definite knowledge were hydraulic with an internal spring. The hydraulic fluid moving from one side of the piston to the other side absorbed the shock and the spring then slowly returned it to start position.

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The Antiques Road Trip has started a new season.  At least on YouTube.  It shows the effect of the Corona Age.  No longer do the two contesting antiques experts shake hands with shop proprietors on meeting them or concluding a sale.  Everyone keeps a safe distance.  Auctions are all on line or by phone, which is a drawback.  You loose the ambience of a roomful of people and the antiques experts efforts to massage the crowd, a big part of the show's fun.  Bidding for objects feels mechanical, despite the efforts of the contenders to pep it up following the auction on personal tablets.  Lost also is the banter as they drive the English countryside between towns.  An advantage is that is they each have their own transportation, providing twice the opportunity for nice cars:

MGA:

280px-MG_A_1600_Roadster_white_vr.jpg

Austin Healey:

5b6a61b698c8db11f7efcde3-large.jpg?cache

 

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Boy have I always loved the "big" Healeys! I do have a 1:18th scale model of the exact car in the exact color pictured above among my collection of scale model cars in my den/man cave.

And in keeping with the theme of your thread here slayton, can you think of any movies off hand which feature them as more than just in passing shots?

(...although I suppose I could look this up  in the IMCDb website for this info, couldn't I)

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No need.  Happy to oblige.  The Austin Healey makes surprisingly few appearances.  If you remember Patrick McGoohan's TV series Danger Man (one of TV's answers to James Bond), you'll find a couple of appearances.  And in Steve Martin's reprisal of Father of the Bride (1991).

The MGA (twin cam used in Antiques Road Trip) also surprisingly shows up only in a handful of assorted European movies too obscure to mention individually.  I give only the IMCDB page:

https://www.imcdb.org/vehicles.php?make=MG&model=A+Twin+Cam&modelMatch=1&modelInclModel=on

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Before Covid, Motor Trend sponsored new car shows around the country.  The one in Greenville SC also had the local British car club participate.  Always had some nice looking cars from across the pond.  Mostly MG's and Triumphs, but a few Healeys, Jags, etc.

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12 hours ago, Dargo said:

Boy have I always loved the "big" Healeys! I do have a 1:18th scale model of the exact car in the exact color pictured above among my collection of scale model cars in my den/man cave.

And in keeping with the theme of your thread here slayton, can you think of any movies off hand which feature them as more than just in passing shots?

(...although I suppose I could look this up  in the IMCDb website for this info, couldn't I)

Lotta model cars in your pvt. domain, eh?  Are they from AMT kits that you put together yourself?  And therefore exposed you to all those Testor glue fumes.  Which would explain a lot, eh?  ;) 

But to stay on topic, I'd have to say my favorite British sports type cars are-----

Sepiatone

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So, you like the Morgans do ya, Sepia?!

Nice handbuilt cars alright, but because their design and their style is just a little too old school for my tastes (the running boards and all, there ol' chap) they've never come close to topping my list of my most desirable cars to own.

It would in the same way that I've always would much rather own a MGA (and like the one slayton posted a pic of above) than I would the earlier MG T-types, and which the Morgans have always reminded me of being just a larger and more powerful version of.

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  • 1 month later...

One of the most wanton acts of mayhem on screen.  I almost have to shield my eyes when I watch it, so brazen and offensive it is.  I know it is illustrative of the soulless evil of Altabani, but surely such excesses are unnecessary and there only for crude shock value.  If a movie needs to rely on that for appeal, then I say it is a lost cause.  It helps some to learn they used run-down cars, but still the psychic toll is heavy.  And now, to learn a Lancia was thrown into the pit as well. . .the horror! the horror!

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15 hours ago, Dargo said:

And now under the heading of: "That WAS a nice car!" or maybe "You've heard of movie 'body doubles' haven't you?! Well, here's an automotive version of this".

The Explosive Story of a Very Bungled Stunt in The Italian Job (roadandtrack.com)

The part at the end about how much had been spent on the DB4 reminded me of an interesting article in the March edition of Hemmings Classic Car magazine on "cheap" collector cars.  Rolls Royce Silver Shadows from the 1970's.  Partially due to unreliable hydraulic systems.  But any old "luxury" cars are expensive to repair and maintain so some are fairly inexpensive to purchase.  The Silver Shadows sell for $5,000 to $31,000.

Read an article in a Mercedes-Benz related magazine and few years ago.  Expert mechanical authority said bad idea to buy older one to restore if you hope to break even later on.  Here again parts and labor to restore are prohibitive.

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2 hours ago, ElCid said:

The part at the end about how much had been spent on the DB4 reminded me of an interesting article in the March edition of Hemmings Classic Car magazine on "cheap" collector cars.  Rolls Royce Silver Shadows from the 1970's.  Partially due to unreliable hydraulic systems.  But any old "luxury" cars are expensive to repair and maintain so some are fairly inexpensive to purchase.  The Silver Shadows sell for $5,000 to $31,000.

Read an article in a Mercedes-Benz related magazine and few years ago.  Expert mechanical authority said bad idea to buy older one to restore if you hope to break even later on.  Here again parts and labor to restore are prohibitive.

And, I'd say a good example of this Cid would be all the times you see a British or German luxury car of fairly recent vintage, say the 1990s through up as recently as even 5 or 6 years ago, being auctioned off at one of Mecum's or Barrett-Jackson's events. When new they could quite often be priced close to or even in six-figure territory, but at those auctions they'll usually only hammer anywhere between $15K-$25K.

(...of course then again, the Mecum and B-J auctions are primarily geared toward American iron and especially muscle cars, and so I've never understood why anyone would even think of auctioning off their Rolls or Benz at one of them, as they're not the kind of cars the bidders in attendance are usually interested in)

 

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