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That's a nice car!


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On 11/15/2021 at 8:02 AM, ElCid said:

Just being pedantic, but in "car speak" hardtop means no B pillar.  Manufacturers originally referred to them as "hardtop convertibles," but that was totally confusing/misleading so they eventually dropped the convertible part.

And just to be extra pedantic, "convertible" is shortened from "convertible sedan" or "convertible coupe".

And the hardtop idea goes way back.  Back in the 1920s and '30s, they were called "faux cabriolets"

The first generation of Lincoln Continentals were sweet rides, and for a while, they seemed to be the official vehicle of the Hollywood "bad girl".   If a stylish lady drove up in one and asked you to get in, you knew your life was about to get a lot more complicated.

Detour41Lincoln1.jpg.29e74be8b40d4f159da9583a7e62cb7b.jpg

While we're talking about Detour, this is one that sometimes throws car spotters, because while it is a '41 Continental,  it's been modified with rear fenders fro a '42, and some new bumpers.

Detour41Lincoln2.jpg.ccc833f63dd76385d5121b67b03b4440.jpg

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Reminds me of this old joke----

Three sailors on shore leave are walking down the street when a lady pulls up to them in a car and says;

"Get in my car boys, and I'll give you something you never had before!"

And one of the sailors shouts;

"Let's get out of here guys!  She's got LEPROSY!"   :lol:

Sepiatone

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That Islero is nice.  A relic of the days hen "restraint" as still part of Lamborghini stylists' vocabulary.

The flip side of nice cars in movies, if you something that's 20-30 years older than every other car in the movie, it's almost a certainty that it's going to explore, or crash.  Doubly so if the hero's best friend or love interest has just gotten in.

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11 hours ago, slaytonf said:

1969 Plymouth Belvedere in Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970):

&f=1&nofb=1

Wish I could post a pic from the movie itself.  With a cred and appeal from the real world.  

I had a '67.   didn't look near as nice.

But would like to know the make of that boat Lee J. Cobb was driving in THE MAN WHO CHEATED HIMSELF!  Seemed all it lacked was a flying bridge! ;) 

Sepiatone

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15 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I had a '67.   didn't look near as nice.

But would like to know the make of that boat Lee J. Cobb was driving in THE MAN WHO CHEATED HIMSELF!  Seemed all it lacked was a flying bridge! ;) 

Sepiatone

I remember watching this film when Muller showed it on Noir Alley a couple of years ago but missed it during its recent showing, and so can't quite recall the car you're referencing in it.

And so, here's the IMCDb webpage for this film...

IMCDb.org: "The Man Who Cheated Himself, 1950": cars, bikes, trucks and other vehicles

(...would it be listed/shown here?)

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I've been watching episodes of US Marshall and Sheriff of Cochise County TV series.  Basically the same series with a name change for some reason.  Anyway, it is set in 1958 or so and the Marshall/Sheriff drives either a Chrysler New Yorker station wagon or a De Soto FireFlite station wagon.  What is amusing is that these are the most expensive cars in their respective lines.

In the real world, he would have been driving a Chevy, Ford or Plymouth station wagon and from the cheaper lines.

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2 hours ago, ElCid said:

I've been watching episodes of US Marshall and Sheriff of Cochise County TV series.  Basically the same series with a name change for some reason.  Anyway, it is set in 1958 or so and the Marshall/Sheriff drives either a Chrysler New Yorker station wagon or a De Soto FireFlite station wagon.  What is amusing is that these are the most expensive cars in their respective lines.

In the real world, he would have been driving a Chevy, Ford or Plymouth station wagon and from the cheaper lines.

Not necessarily, Cid!

Maybe the sheriff got real lucky at the local Indian casino's blackjack tables just before he went lookin' for a station wagon, and so then decided to upgrade his ride.

(...didn't think o' this, did ya) ;)

 

 

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23 hours ago, Dargo said:

I remember watching this film when Muller showed it on Noir Alley a couple of years ago but missed it during its recent showing, and so can't quite recall the car you're referencing in it.

And so, here's the IMCDb webpage for this film...

IMCDb.org: "The Man Who Cheated Himself, 1950": cars, bikes, trucks and other vehicles

(...would it be listed/shown here?)

Thanks, man....

I do believe it was this-------

And we wondered where all the GAS went!  ;)  With that and all the other "boats" Detroit was putting out on the roads. 

Sepiatone

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  • 3 weeks later...

So, what was that car Dick Powell was tooling around in  on the movie SUSAN SLEPT HERE?

Seemed to have a Cadillac crest on the front grille,  but  also the front-end look of another car I can't recall the make of.  

Need serious gearhead help!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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28 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

So, what was that car Dick Powell was tooling around in  on the movie SUSAN SLEPT HERE?

Seemed to have a Cadillac crest on the front grille,  but  also the front-end look of another car I can't recall the make of.  

Need serious gearhead help!  ;) 

Sepiatone

That was Dick Powell's own Nash-Healey, and it was George Reeves' ride in The Adventures of Superman.

It was a collaboration between American automaker Nash, and Donald Healey, who was later responsible for the Austin-Healey.   It actually beat out the Corvette for the title of America's first sports car.

poster_qckwil

They used a similar grille on later models of the regular Nash.

image-placeholder-title.jpg

 

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On 12/25/2021 at 11:37 AM, rjbartrop said:

Understandable, as the Nash badge does look pretty similar, especially from a distance.

Nash-Logo-300x258.jpg

ac98035c2481cbf10a7385fa3c66a504--gift-i

Yep, RJ. All ya gotta do is put a few ducks on that Nash emblem and you've pretty much got a Caddy emblem almost, huh! ;)

I'm sure you remember those six ducks on the old Caddy emblems, don't ya?

s-l1600.jpg

I remember as a kid wondering what the significance was of those ducks on the badges that were on my dad's 1962 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, anyway.

(...gee, I wonder if our resident retired GM lineworker Sepia knows?)

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7 hours ago, NoShear said:

  That's a nice house!

 Dargo, I'm confident that both Harry Gesner's architecture and Bill Mitchell's styling will meet with your approval here:

                     LB-Breezy-House-Tarzana-2.jpg?w=1024

You're so right here, NS.

Mid-Century Modern is my favorite architectual style, and the C-2 Stringray parked off to the right there, is still one of my top favorite cars ever made, too. 

(...gotta love the Jet Age, dude!)  

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2 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

Re: "But what movies has the C-2 Stingray been in?"

 The Corvette was supplemental to the BREEZY home which is actually located in Tarzana, California.

                                                                             AALYKfO.img?h=315&w=600&m=6&q=60&o=t&l=f&f=jpg&x=514&y=161

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