Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

That's a nice car!


slaytonf
 Share

Recommended Posts

The early to mid-sixties present a curious era.  Decidedly after the peak of modernism, it still epitomized the essentials of it's philosophy in design and style.  Spare, sleek, sharp--even knife-edge designs; contrasts in surface textures; cantilevered structures.  In fashion there is the restrained chic of Givenchy, Dior, and Chanel.  In painting, abstract expressionism, the ultimate reduction of image to its minimal elements.  In architecture, the flat roof and glass wall houses that sought to erase the boundaries of interior and exterior spaces.  And in auto design, it was reflected in models like the 1965 Plymouth Fury, seen here in Agent 505-Death Trap Beirut (1966):

i001210201.jpg

Maybe not the best example, but demonstrating the elements of the aesthetic.  I'm not sure if car designers were simply aping current trends, or they genuinely strove for creativity (probably a combination of both).  Nonetheless, some of the best car designs America ever produced came from this era.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, slaytonf said:

The early to mid-sixties present a curious era.  Decidedly after the peak of modernism, it still epitomized the essentials of it's philosophy in design and style.  Spare, sleek, sharp--even knife-edge designs; contrasts in surface textures; cantilevered structures.  In fashion there is the restrained chic of Givenchy, Dior, and Chanel.  In painting, abstract expressionism, the ultimate reduction of image to its minimal elements.  In architecture, the flat roof and glass wall houses that sought to erase the boundaries of interior and exterior spaces.  And in auto design, it was reflected in models like the 1965 Plymouth Fury, seen here in Agent 505-Death Trap Beirut (1966):

i001210201.jpg

Maybe not the best example, but demonstrating the elements of the aesthetic.  I'm not sure if car designers were simply aping current trends, or they genuinely strove for creativity (probably a combination of both).  Nonetheless, some of the best car designs America ever produced came from this era.

Yep, I agree slayton. After the tailfin craze in American car design waned, I also think some of the cleanest designs to ever come out of Detroit were done during this period.

One of my personal favorites in this regard being the 1962 Chevy Impala like the one here...

1962-chevrolet-impala-ss-409-409-hp-4-sp

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Triumphs have been mentioned before, but I don't think this early model with it's extravagant lines has.  From Agente Z-55, mission despere (1965--boy, I'm really scraping the barrel), the Triumph TR-2:

9117703977680146_5b627f8167_o.jpg

Looks like it's already breaking speed limits just sitting there.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/18/2022 at 3:57 PM, Dargo said:

Yep, I agree slayton. After the tailfin craze in American car design waned, I also think some of the cleanest designs to ever come out of Detroit were done during this period.

One of my personal favorites in this regard being the 1962 Chevy Impala like the one here...

1962-chevrolet-impala-ss-409-409-hp-4-sp

 

Man, I would love to have a car like that. Why can't they make models like this today?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Man, I would love to have a car like that. Why can't they make models like this today?

 

Being an actual "car", probably because it just wouldn't sell anymore, Beth. 

As I'm sure you know, pretty much everyone now days are buying SUVs and crossover vehicles, and with many car companies already dropping or about to drop their passenger car offerings because of this purchasing trend.

(...but yeah, don't ya just love the lines on this car?!...love those '62 Chevys)

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Man, I would love to have a car like that. Why can't they make models like this today?

 

Hardly anybody would buy them.  Also, it would cost too much just for all the steel in them.

In fact, the "sedan" or car market is disappearing.  Only trucks, SUV's and CUV's are major players.   Buick no longer makes sedans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, slaytonf said:

Triumphs have been mentioned before, but I don't think this early model with it's extravagant lines has.  From Agente Z-55, mission despere (1965--boy, I'm really scraping the barrel), the Triumph TR-2:

9117703977680146_5b627f8167_o.jpg

Looks like it's already breaking speed limits just sitting there.

Back in mid-70's my neighbor had a TR-6 and I had a Fiat 124 Spider.  Mine ran; his didn't much of the time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Dargo said:

Being an actual "car", probably because it just wouldn't sell anymore, Beth. 

As I'm sure you know, pretty much everyone now days are buying SUVs and crossover vehicles, and with many car companies already dropping or about to drop their passenger car offerings because of this purchasing trend.

(...but yeah, don't ya just love the lines on this car?!...love those '62 Chevys)

 

The main reason would be that such a car couldn't pass the current safety,  fuel and emissions standards.      It would have to be redesigned and then it wouldn't be the same.  

PS:  I assume the question was  rhetorical. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Michelangelo Antonioni is not for everybody.  His movies go at a deliberative pace (some say slow).  The mood is introspective.  Dialog is often sparse.  Elements of the story and the motivations of the characters are enigmatic, ambivalent.  But I like his movies, even just looking at them.  I don't get all of his visuals, assuming there is something to get.  What does this have to do with cars?  Well, I just watched one of his movies, called The Passenger (1975), appropriately enough.  It's a picaresque tale of a reporter who takes on the identity of a man he strikes up an acquaintance with and who he finds dead in his desert African hotel room.  Examining the reasons for why he does this is a big part of what the movie is about.  But we're not here to discuss this.  We're here to admire the car he buys as part of his peripatetic adventures.  Another example of the fine design of the sixties, a 1966 Mercury Comet convertible:

i040193.jpg

I have to admit, Maria Schneider edges out the car a little bit.  Well, a lot.  Here's my favorite shot of her:

 

Shots like these are why I like Antonioni.  I get a thrill seeing it even on a TV, must be a blast on a big screen.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, slaytonf said:

 

I have to admit, Maria Schneider edges out the car a little bit. 

 

No offense here slayton, but my opinion about this would be that Mercury edges out Maria here.

She was always just a little too "gamine" for my tastes, ya see. Uh-huh, and kind'a like why Leslie Caron and Genevieve Bujold never did a thing for me either.

(...I THINK I used the right term here, anyway)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to Dictionary.com Gamine is defined as:

noun
  1.  a neglected girl who is left to run about the streets.
  2.  a diminutive or very slender girl, especially one who is pert, impudent, or playfully mischievous
adjective
  1.  of or like a gamine: a gamine personality; clothes for the gamine figure.

Take yer pick.  Of course, I always defer to your opinion.  However, I've always found it better to make out on the back seat of a Comet, rather than with the back seat of a Comet.  So if Maria Schneider smiles at me (alas! no longer possible!) I will smile back.

 

But what do you think of the last two shots of the clip?  Aren't they fabulous?  The shot of Maria against the trees rushing by.  And the sight down the retreating road. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, slaytonf said:

According to Dictionary.com Gamine is defined as:

noun
  1.  a neglected girl who is left to run about the streets.
  2.  a diminutive or very slender girl, especially one who is pert, impudent, or playfully mischievous
adjective
  1.  of or like a gamine: a gamine personality; clothes for the gamine figure.

Take yer pick.  Of course, I always defer to your opinion.  However, I've always found it better to make out on the back seat of a Comet, rather than with the back seat of a Comet.  So if Maria Schneider smiles at me (alas! no longer possible!) I will smile back.

 

But what do you think of the last two shots of the clip?  Aren't they fabulous?  The shot of Maria against the trees rushing by.  And the sight down the retreating road. 

Well slayton, all I can tell ya here is that in the couple of online dictionary sources in which I've just now looked up the word "gamine", both first said the word applied to "a young woman who's attractively boyish" and "a young woman with a mischievous, boyish charm".

But yes, the other definition noted was indeed "a neglected girl/street urchin".

Ya see, what I was attempting to say up there was that I've been that attracted to boyish-looking young women. But HEY and as they say, "Whatever gets YOUR motor runnin' is quite alright with me!"

(...see what I did there?..."your motor runnin'"?...like in a "car's motor"???...how appropriate here, wouldn't ya say?!...well, it sure was a hell of lot more appropriate than the "whatever floats your boat" line that I had AT FIRST typed into my response to you here anyway, RIGHT???!!!  ;)

LOL

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, slaytonf said:

But what do you think of the last two shots of the clip?  Aren't they fabulous?  The shot of Maria against the trees rushing by.  And the sight down the retreating road.

Yep, I do have to admit those camera shots give credence to your point about Antonioni's talent at directing in an unusual and distinct visual style.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Dargo said:

Well slayton, all I can tell ya here is that in the couple of online dictionary sources in which I've just now looked up the word "gamine", both first said the word applied to "a young woman who's attractively boyish" and "a young woman with a mischievous, boyish charm".

But yes, the other definition noted was indeed "a neglected girl/street urchin".

Ya see, what I was attempting to say up there was that I've been that attracted to boyish-looking young women. But HEY and as they say, "Whatever gets YOUR motor runnin' is quite alright with me!"

(...see what I did there?..."your motor runnin'"?...like in a "car's motor"???...how appropriate here, wouldn't ya say?!...well, it sure was a hell of lot more appropriate than the "whatever floats your boat" line that I had AT FIRST typed into my response to you here anyway, RIGHT???!!!  ;)

LOL

 

At the risk of diverting discussion from the topic, I will say I am thinking about starting two new threads, the first called, "Homoerotic qualities of movie stars, or two for the price of one."  The other called, "Auto-erotic fetishism in movies."  (Auto, get it?  Auto--um, never mind.)

As for the clip, it's the sense of exhilaration I get seeing it that makes me use it as an example of Antonioni's genius.  Someone who knows about camerawork can correct me, but I think he used a slightly wide angle lens to exaggerate how the trees first stream out from the center of the frame, where the Girl is, and then collapse into the center, watching from her perspective.  Of course, it's meant to express her exhilaration, how she feels like she's flying, holding her arms out.  But also the last shot looking back down the road where they've come from also gives a feeling of helplessness.  Of falling away from something, into something they have no control over.  Jacques Demy does something like that at the beginning of Bay of Angels (1963), where the camera runs backward along a seafront concourse to symbolize the main characters powerlessness over their gambling addiction.  So at once you get a sense of soaring and of danger.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems like a standard focal length lens(possibly 70mm given when the film was shot) to me.

By the way....

Watching THE VERDICT last night, I was wondering if any savvy gearheads here know what kind of car that was that Dr, Gruber was driving?

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Seems like a standard focal length lens(possibly 70mm given when the film was shot) to me.

By the way....

Watching THE VERDICT last night, I was wondering if any savvy gearheads here know what kind of car that was that Dr, Gruber was driving?

Sepiatone

I only know SLR cameras. The standard focal length for them is 35mm. I don't know if movie cameras are the same. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, any SLRs one used to buy came standard with a 50mm lens.  35mm was the wide angle.  And 70mm has been standard for movie cameras for decades.  

35mm is standard for those "point and shoot" cameras though. 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(and now observe how I so effortlessly get this baby here back on the topic of cars and away from all this camera talk) ;)

HEY, and speaking of "SLR"s here, guys...

How about THIS gorgeous Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Roadster?  Oh yeah, AND with one like it being featured in the 2009 movie Gumball  3000: Coast to Coast...

S0-Mercedes-McLaren-SLR-Roadster-c-est-o

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...