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That's a nice car!


slaytonf
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9 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Oh yeah, Mr. G! Thanks for pointing out the vast similarities between the front end of this Merc(edes)...

Mercedes-Benz-300_SLR-1955-1600-03.jpg

...and with that of this mid-'90s Merc(ury) Sable...

1993_mercury_sable_4_dr_ls_sedan-pic-348

Why, I can't believe I've never noticed this before!   

LOL <---my laughter here signifying that there is in fact NO similarities to be made here.

 Striking!

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8 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I must agree with myself, DARGO.   :D

The front end of that Mercedes and the '97 Mercury Sable both look like bug-eyed insects to me.   

In that case, what other species does the following 1961 full-size Dodge remind you of here?...

ebay489505.jpg

I wonder if it might be the same species that it has always reminded ME of.

(...that being, wait for it...a MOOSE!)

 

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3 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

The front end of that car looks INTIMIDATING.  Like it's LEERING at you.  What a nice ol' beastie! 

Well then, I guess this now confirms the idea that you and I hold completely different opinions about what constitutes "a nice looking car".

(...as I've always thought MOPAR's nadir of car styling happened during the early-1960s and exemplified by that Dodge up there)

 

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46 minutes ago, Dargo said:

In that case, what other species does the following 1961 full-size Dodge remind you of here?...

ebay489505.jpg

I wonder if it might be the same species that it has always reminded ME of.

(...that being, wait for it...a MOOSE!)

 

 Well, if we're going to start throwing anthropomorphism at metal...

                                                            db90a5956cb24f9cba4c4588ddc9c124--paint-colours-fishing.jpg

                                                                       

    

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30 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 Well, if we're going to start throwing anthropomorphism at metal...

                                                            db90a5956cb24f9cba4c4588ddc9c124--paint-colours-fishing.jpg

                                                                       

    

Good point here ND, however in the cases of the Vette and the Batmobile up there, both Larry Shinoda and George Barris were obviously going for that look of an animal when they penned their respective designs.

(...and whereas in the case of that gawdawful looking Dodge, I doubt Virgil Exner realized HIS design looked like a damn moose until he walked into some Detroit Dodge dealership the Fall of 1960 and said to himself something like, "MY GOD! What have I done here?!!!")

LOL

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18 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Re: "Good point here ND, however in the cases of the Vette and the Batmobile up there, both Larry Shinoda and George Barris were obviously going for that look of an animal when they penned their respective designs."

 Admittedly, Dargo, I think it was just a blatant excuse on my part to throw both a Mako shark and the '66 Batmobile into this thread.

 I now need to go look for a photo of Jennifer Aniston posing next to an anthropomorphic-looking vehicle...

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Oh yeah, Mr. G! Thanks for pointing out the vast similarities between the front end of this Merc(edes)...

Mercedes-Benz-300_SLR-1955-1600-03.jpg

...and with that of this mid-'90s Merc(ury) Sable...

1993_mercury_sable_4_dr_ls_sedan-pic-348

Why, I can't believe I've never noticed this before!   

LOL <---my laughter here signifying that there is in fact NO similarities to be made here.

However and to another point that you and slayton made here...have to agree with you guys that NO car ever made would or should be worth this obscene amount of money, but there are so many high rollers out there now days who have an obscene amount of money that this is now where the market stands for such limited edition types of cars such as this GORGEOUS Benz here and which in its case owns one of the most impressive racing pedigrees in the annuls of motorsports.

(...well, at least until the next stock market crash comes around anyway. and which will probably happen within the next couple of years)

 

It would probably be amazing to discover how many people own 25, 50 or more collectible cars.  Not talking about junk cars piled up behind the house either.

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Just now, ElCid said:

It would probably be amazing to discover how many people own 25, 50 or more collectible cars.  Not talking about junk cars piled up behind the house either.

Yep Cid, there are a lot more Jay Lenos out there in this regard than the general public knows about, alright.

(...they're just not as well-known as he is, that's all)

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23 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Re: "Good point here ND, however in the cases of the Vette and the Batmobile up there, both Larry Shinoda and George Barris were obviously going for that look of an animal when they penned their respective designs."

 I think someone got a little carried away with the concept here, Dargo:

                                                      3303892mm_7a526e21bd45c27f6a5b51d033becb1efb36498f.jpg 

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17 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep Cid, there are a lot more Jay Lenos out there in this regard than the general public knows about, alright.

(...they're just not as well-known as he is, that's all)

I met a local guy at a small church car show couple of weeks ago and he said he has 50 cars under roofs in good condition at his home.  He had a 56 Dodge in very good condition and said he had four De Sotos as well.

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On 5/7/2022 at 12:19 PM, NoShear said:

 Here's a safe entry, Dargo. I noticed it during TCM's latest screening of Valley of the Dolls - a '65 Corvette STING-RAY which I took as something of a be-careful-what-you-wish-for "prop":

                                                      i193448.jpg 

 Dargo, another silver sighting in another 1967 Sharon Tate silver screen:

                                                                 i359442.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
1 hour ago, slaytonf said:

1931 Graham Standard Six in Night Nurse 1931:

i201318.jpg

And now, the history of the Graham Automobile Company in a nutshell:

Three brothers with backgrounds in farm equipment production, namely Ray, Joseph and Robert Graham, are the catalyst behind the Graham automobile. This trio moved up the Dodge corporate ladder and by 1926 was totally in charge of Dodge’s truck assembly plant.

In 1927, the brothers decided to branch out themselves and purchased the faltering Paige Motor Company. The first Graham car was dubbed a “Graham Paige,” released in 1928, and the Graham cars continued along through 1941 (although the Paige badge disappeared in 1931).
 
With the “Crash of 1929” at hand, Graham sales numbers hit an all-time high of 77,000 that year. In 1930, the Grahams released both six cylinder and inline eight cylinder models, including a beautiful long wheelbase 137-inch “Custom Eight Town Car.” Sales, however, dropped to less than 40,000 cars as the depression era was in high gear.
 
By 1932 sales plummeted to just over 12,000 units as all manufacturers struggled.  In 1934, hoping to reverse a poor sales trend, the Grahams introduced a supercharged eight cylinder for just $1,295. They also hired Erwin “Cannonball” Baker, a well known car and motorcycle racer from the era, to drive the car cross-country in less than 54 hours. His accomplishment certified the Graham supercharger’s endurance.  Still, sales struggled.
 
By 1936, the Grahams offered only six-cylinder cars and were still in declining financial health.  They even sold their 1935 tooling to Datsun/Nissan in Japan, but even with the Nissan cash infusion the company lost over $1-million that year.

By 1937-38, things were still shaky at the company, and even a new “sharknose” Blue Streak  didn’t help as only 5,020 cars were sold. Joe Graham then partnered up with Norman DeVaux, who had purchased 1937 Cord 810/812 tooling, followed by linking with the Hupp Automobile Company in a joint venture to save all companies involved.  Thus, the Hupp Skylark and Graham Hollywood were identical cars, and debuted in 1939 and 1940, respectively.

Neither car helped or sold well, although both were beauties.

Hupp then closed its doors early in 1940 and finally Graham called it quits in the fall of 1940. However, Joseph Graham survived as World War II found the Graham company receiving close to $20-million in defense contracts to build needed war equipment.

In 1944, Joseph Frazer, of soon to be Kaiser-Frazer fame, bought Graham’s company and released its first car, the Frazer-Graham sold in 1946-47. From then on, Frazer hooked up with Kaiser car manufacturing, and the Graham name was gone for good.

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9 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

All that just to make a nice car.

Yep, however and perhaps even more so, a history lesson as to why almost all auto companies are eventually run by "the bean counters" and not "car guys".

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Strange, as that seems to be when they go downhill.  Today, automobiles may be well built (relative to the past) and technically sophisticated (too much so), but I see little nice.  They are all either nondescript aerodynamic blobs, or aggressive angular transformer emulations.  *sigh* Even Jaguar is uninspiring.

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1 hour ago, slaytonf said:

Even Jaguar is uninspiring

Really? Well I have to say I've thought their most recent two-seater, the F-type, was and is a very beautiful car and since the day they were introduced back in 2013...

640px-Paris_Motor_Show_2012_(8065248951)

400px-2015_Jaguar_F-Type_S_V6_AWD_Automa

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11 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yep, however and perhaps even more so, a history lesson as to why almost all auto companies are eventually run by "the bean counters" and not "car guys".

I subscribe to two old car magazines and go to a lot of old car shows.   Also have over 100 books on "classic cars."  The companies who failed did so for many reasons and a primary one was because the "car guys" had too much influence and the "bean counters" had too little.

Automotive designers and engineers are great, but if the company cannot make a car that they sell a lot of and  for a profit, it goes out of business.

10 hours ago, slaytonf said:

Strange, as that seems to be when they go downhill.  Today, automobiles may be well built (relative to the past) and technically sophisticated (too much so), but I see little nice.  They are all either nondescript aerodynamic blobs, or aggressive angular transformer emulations.  *sigh* Even Jaguar is uninspiring.

Personally, I can't tell much difference between cars built in the 1910's through 1930's.  They mostly look the same to me.  Some standout, but not that many.  On the other hand there are young people today who are interested in present day/recent cars and can easily tell the differences between different makes and models.

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If we're discussing some auto history here, how about the days when you could go to the local Sears and Roebuck store(in some states) and not only buy Allstate auto insurance, but also the car to insure!?!

Also known as the Henry J,  they didn't last too long.   I remember my Grandmother had an old Henry J that was a dull olive green and seriously needed a muffler.  It became a family joke.  My Mom would sometimes tell me, "Go stand at the curb and tell me when you can hear your Grandmother coming."  :lol:  My Grandma and Grandpa already owned a nice '54 Oldsmobile 88,  But she got the Henry 'cause she said she needed something to get around in while my Grandpa was still at work( he was still a few years from retiring from GM).

Sepiatone

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12 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

If we're discussing some auto history here, how about the days when you could go to the local Sears and Roebuck store(in some states) and not only buy Allstate auto insurance, but also the car to insure!?!

Also known as the Henry J,  they didn't last too long.   I remember my Grandmother had an old Henry J that was a dull olive green and seriously needed a muffler.  It became a family joke.  My Mom would sometimes tell me, "Go stand at the curb and tell me when you can hear your Grandmother coming."  :lol:  My Grandma and Grandpa already owned a nice '54 Oldsmobile 88,  But she got the Henry 'cause she said she needed something to get around in while my Grandpa was still at work( he was still a few years from retiring from GM).

Sepiatone

The Henry J was made by Kaiser and named after Henry J. Kaiser.  It was a cheaply made car, but apparently not cheaply priced enough to make it a big seller.

I believe the All State versions were sold in Sears stores in the South.  But not for very long as they did not sell well.  Also, they were actually lower priced than the Henry J versions and Sears used their parts on their models when they could.

Not a very good car, but an early attempt to produce a car for Americans who did not want the big cars from Detroit - or a Volkswagen.   Probably a bit too early as the 1960 Falcon really started the small car boost in America.  

Of course, American Motors had also been making the Rambler American as a compact and no way the Henry J could compete with it.  Heck Lois Lane even drove one in the Superman TV series.

Image result for 1953 Rambler American picture

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16 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

If we're discussing some auto history here, how about the days when you could go to the local Sears and Roebuck store(in some states) and not only buy Allstate auto insurance, but also the car to insure!?!

Also known as the Henry J,  they didn't last too long.   I remember my Grandmother had an old Henry J that was a dull olive green and seriously needed a muffler.  It became a family joke.  My Mom would sometimes tell me, "Go stand at the curb and tell me when you can hear your Grandmother coming."  :lol:  My Grandma and Grandpa already owned a nice '54 Oldsmobile 88,  But she got the Henry 'cause she said she needed something to get around in while my Grandpa was still at work( he was still a few years from retiring from GM).

Sepiatone

I wonder how many states allowed this?  Most states have strict laws on car retailing, thanks to lobbying by the industry.  For a modern-day example, even though Tesla is now headquartered in Texas, the company can't sell its cars here because they do not have a franchised dealer model for selling their cars.  They sell directly to consumers, which isn't allowed here.  About half the states either outright prohibit Tesla from selling directly to customers, or limit the number of dealerships they can own.

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3 minutes ago, ElCid said:

The Henry J was made by Kaiser and named after Henry J. Kaiser.  It was a cheaply made car, but apparently not cheaply priced enough to make it a big seller.

I believe the All State versions were sold in Sears stores in the South.  But not for very long as they did not sell well.  Also, they were actually lower priced than the Henry J versions and Sears used their parts on their models when they could.

Not a very good car, but an early attempt to produce a car for Americans who did not want the big cars from Detroit - or a Volkswagen.   Probably a bit too early as the 1960 Falcon really started the small car boost in America.  

Of course, American Motors had also been making the Rambler American as a compact and no way the Henry J could compete with it.  Heck Lois Lane even drove one in the Superman TV series.

Image result for 1953 Rambler American picture

I believe Sears also for a time, sold a huge kit with which one could build a car themselves.

Sepiatone

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