Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

That's a nice car!


slaytonf
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

I wonder how many states allowed this?  Most states have strict laws on car retailing, thanks to lobbying by the industry.  For a modern-day example, even though Tesla is now headquartered in Texas, the company can't sell its cars here because they do not have a franchised dealer model for selling their cars.  They sell directly to consumers, which isn't allowed here.  About half the states either outright prohibit Tesla from selling directly to customers, or limit the number of dealerships they can own.

I think they got by it because Sears was a retail store.  Also, likely no Kaiser dealers around to complain about competition.  As I said, I think it was only done in the South.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe that the requirement for local dealerships is to ensure that there is someone within the state who can be held responsible for any irregularities. It is difficult for a state to press charges of false advertising or fraud on companies located only in some other state. A citizen is at a serious disadvantage when they must sue a company located in some other state. 

I believe that Sears would have had no problem filling all the legal requirements to be granted a license to sell automobiles as they were established business locations with local executives who could be served subpoenas. 

I doubt that any state ever made it necessary for a business to show that it was capable of performing any of the mechanical aspects related to sale or upkeep of automobiles.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, SansFin said:

I believe that Sears would have had no problem filling all the legal requirements to be granted a license to sell automobiles as they were established business locations with local executives who could be served subpoenas. 

And then of course from the late-'40s through to the mid-'60s, Sears sold scooters and motorcycles manufactured by Cushman(in the USA), Piaggio and Vespa(in Italy) and Puch (in Austria) and sold and serviced them at many but not all of their locations, and which were rebranded as either "Sears" or "Allstate".

And FWIW here...the second motorcycle I ever purchased at age 16 in 1968 was manufactured in Italy by the Benelli concern (yes Sans, as you probably know, the same company that manufactures firearms) and sold to me at a Montgomery Ward (Sears' main retail competitor at the time) location in SoCal, and which were rebadged as  "Wards Riverside" motorcycles.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Dargo said:

Really? Well I have to say I've thought their most recent two-seater, the F-type, was and is a very beautiful car and since the day they were introduced back in 2013...

640px-Paris_Motor_Show_2012_(8065248951)

400px-2015_Jaguar_F-Type_S_V6_AWD_Automa

Everyone has their preferences.  My reaction is ho-hum.  To me there used to be something exceptional about Jaguar design.  It communicated something of the form of the animal itself.  That is, the animal as depicted by the mascot:

th?id=OIP.1oqg5WbTjdZVmKXuG-2Q2QHaE8%26p

From the abstracted representation of the animal, the even more abstracted design of the cars derived.  It was not always as apparent, or successful, but always distinctive. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, ElCid said:

Personally, I can't tell much difference between cars built in the 1910's through 1930's.  They mostly look the same to me.  Some standout, but not that many.

That's always the case.  And not only with cars.  At any time you have conventions in style that are mechanically adhered to without inspiration.  In rare cases you get something not made in a current style, but using the style as a means of creation and communication, whether its clothing, music, or cars.  Or movies.  Most of the things created are of a style or an era, and are forgotten with their passing.  The ones that employ a style for creation transcend their conventions and time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, ElCid said:

The companies who failed did so for many reasons and a primary one was because the "car guys" had too much influence and the "bean counters" had too little

And what happens when the bean counters get too much influence?  Do we get Detroit in the 70s and 80s? 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Dargo said:

And then of course from the late-'40s through to the mid-'60s, Sears sold scooters and motorcycles manufactured by Cushman(in the USA), Piaggio and Vespa(in Italy) and Puch (in Austria) and sold and serviced them at many but not all of their locations, and which were rebranded as either "Sears" or "Allstate".

And FWIW here...the second motorcycle I ever purchased at age 16 in 1968 was manufactured in Italy by the Benelli concern (yes Sans, as you probably know, the same company that manufactures firearms) and sold to me at a Montgomery Ward (Sears' main retail competitor at the time) location in SoCal, and which were rebadged as  "Wards Riverside" motorcycles.

 

I know of Benelli but have no experience with them. They began production long after my access to and interest in general firearms waned. It is also that they primarily are known for shotguns. Smelly and messy things. A 20 gauge semi-automatic with a pistol grip and eighteen inch barrel might be excellent for home defense but I see no other use for them.

I am sorry to say that you are wasting your time. You will not turn my head with names such as: Cushman, Piaggio or Vespa. Tula and Vyatka are the names to know. 

Vyatka V-150M Electron

Vyatka-elektron.jpg

 

Pishite pisma (1981) had one of a different color as a primary vehicle in the movie.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, SansFin said:

 

I know of Benelli but have no experience with them. They began production long after my access to and interest in general firearms waned. It is also that they primarily are known for shotguns. Smelly and messy things. A 20 gauge semi-automatic with a pistol grip and eighteen inch barrel might be excellent for home defense but I see no other use for them.

I am sorry to say that you are wasting your time. You will not turn my head with names such as: Cushman, Piaggio or Vespa. Tula and Vyatka are the names to know. 

Vyatka V-150M Electron

Vyatka-elektron.jpg

Gotta admit those are two names that are new to me here Sans, as I believe the only manufacturer of two-wheeled motorized transport that I know of and made in any of the old Warsaw Pact nations and which ever made their way upon these shores would be those made by the Ural Motorcycle company, and which are almost always sold with sidecars attached to them as you may know.

And so thanks for enlightening me here about this.

(...btw, after just now doing an internet search for these two Russian scooter brands, it said the first generation of the Vyatka, the VP-150 model, was an unlicensed copy of the Vespa 150, and so I'm sorry to inform you that all those years you saw those models running around the highways and biways of your old stomping grounds over there, your head was infact "being turned" by what was in essence a Vespa but with some "Ruskie" name illegally emblazened upon them instead!)  ;)  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And now a slight correction to my above post:

I've just remembered that CZ and Jawa motorcycles were (and still are) manufactured in what was the country of Czechoslovakia and at the time a member of the old Warsaw Pact, and with both of these m/c motorcycle companies having their wares sold in the U.S. and even during the Cold War.

(...and now I'm wondering if I might be overlooking any others here?)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Dargo said:

[...]

it said the first generation of the Vyatka, the VP-150 model, was an unlicensed copy of the Vespa 150, 

[...]

That is quite true but no one ever took them seriously. It was the 150M of their own design which made them important and turned heads.

You are overlooking many motorcycles. 

DNEPR located in Ukraine.

Quote

Since the 1951, the KMZ-Dnepr begins the production of the "M-72", totally similar to the Ural model that has the same name: flat-twin, 750 cc, side valves, 22 hp. The evolutions of this model were produced in Russia until the years '70's, but, still today, the Ural/Dnepr 750 with side valves are produced in China! 

Izh

Quote

The Izh is a well-known producer of weapons (the most famous example is the "Kalashnikov" machine-gun). However, about the production for the civil market, the Izh was not only an automotive factory, but also the main Soviet motorcycle factory before the fall of the USSR, with a production even more massive than the IMZ-Ural. Considering that the Izh was the main Soviet motorcycle factory, and that the USSR was the second producer of motorcycles (after the Japan) until the early '90s, it possible to say that this Russian brand was one of the greatest factories in the world about number of production (11.000.000 of bikes produced since the 1927). But, in spite of these numbers, it's almost totally unknown in the Western countries! 

Vostok

Quote

when the USSR decided for the partecipation in the international competitions, the old two-stroke of German derivation were abandoned, and a new range of totally russian four-stroke machines was realized: the "S-155" single-cylinder 125 cc; the "S-254" (naked and with a little fairing), 250 cc twin cylinder, and the "S-555", always twin cylinder, but with a displacement of 500 cc. All these bikes (also known with the "SKEB" brand), designed by Evgenij Mathiushin, were equipped with DOHC timing and valves driven by shaft and conic gears; the frames were inspired to the British Norton "Featherbed". Although the inspiration from several Western machines, these bikes were the early totally-Soviet racing motorcycles, not simply and brutally copied from other bikes. 

ZID

Quote

The ZID (official name of this factory) was founded in the 1953 in the city of Kovrov. Like the Minsk 125, the first ZID's model, the "K-55" of the 1946 was substantially a copy of the German DKW "RT 125", one of the most copied motorcycles in the history. The "K-55" was even exported in some European country.

In the 1957, that bike was replaced by a new model, the "Voskhod", that stands for "sunrise" in Russian. In comparison with the Minsk 125, this bike had a slightly bigger engine (175 cc), the 5-speed gearbox and the double exhaust pipe...that was all, but with these few features, the Voskhod was like a luxury compact car for the Russian citizen! The bike was kept substantially unchanged, and it was modified, during the years, only in the suspensions and in the look. 

There is also in allied countries: MZ, Tomos, Pannonia, Minsk and Simson.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, slaytonf said:

That's always the case.  And not only with cars.  At any time you have conventions in style that are mechanically adhered to without inspiration.  In rare cases you get something not made in a current style, but using the style as a means of creation and communication, whether its clothing, music, or cars.  Or movies.  Most of the things created are of a style or an era, and are forgotten with their passing.  The ones that employ a style for creation transcend their conventions and time.

Ironically when Chrysler introduced their Chrysler and De Soto Airflow cars in mid-30's,  they tanked because they looked too different from everybody else's cars. 

12 hours ago, slaytonf said:

And what happens when the bean counters get too much influence?  Do we get Detroit in the 70s and 80s? 

Maybe, but if no one is counting the beans, the companies go out of business.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, slaytonf said:

And what happens when the bean counters get too much influence?  Do we get Detroit in the 70s and 80s? 

You mean when the difference between the Dodge Omni and Plymouth Horizon,  or the Chevy Nova and Pontiac Tempest and Oldsmobile Omega  or Cadillac El Dorado and Olds Toronado (all which looked like they were stamped out of the same machine) was the script fastened to their bodies?  ;)   And the Cadillac Coupe DeVille looked like it was based on a Kellogg's  corn flakes box?  :D 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

You mean when the difference between the Dodge Omni and Plymouth Horizon,  or the Chevy Nova and Pontiac Tempest and Oldsmobile Omega  or Cadillac El Dorado and Olds Toronado (all which looked like they were stamped out of the same machine) was the script fastened to their bodies?  ;)   And the Cadillac Coupe DeVille looked like it was based on a Kellogg's  corn flakes box?  :D 

Sepiatone

On the other hand did the designers and the brand loyalists have too much influence in keeping the brands going past their usefulness dates?

Note: Plymouth is gone, Pontiac is gone, Oldsmobile is gone.  As for the Cadillac Coupe DeVille, not sure which model you are speaking about, but I have never found any Cadillac good looking. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, SansFin said:

That is quite true but no one ever took them seriously. It was the 150M of their own design which made them important and turned heads.

You are overlooking many motorcycles. 

DNEPR located in Ukraine.

Izh

Vostok

ZID

There is also in allied countries: MZ, Tomos, Pannonia, Minsk and Simson.

Thanks for the interesting info here, Sans. 

Although, the only motorcyle brand you've additionally mentioned here and which as far as I know would ever be sold in the U.S., would be the MZ.

(...and of which I think but am not sure of, were only imported after the reunification of Germany, as the MZ concern is located in what used to be the country of East Germany)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Dargo said:

Thanks for the interesting info here, Sans. 

Although, the only motorcyle brand you've additionally mentioned here and which as far as I know would ever be sold in the U.S., would be the MZ.

(...and of which I think but am not sure of, were only imported after the reunification of Germany, as the MZ concern is located in what used to be the country of East Germany)

I feel it is unfortunate that: Tarus 2x2 marketing in USA never materialized as planned. Sigh! I guess USA is not ready for an AWD motorcycle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, SansFin said:

I feel it is unfortunate that: Tarus 2x2 marketing in USA never materialized as planned. Sigh! I guess USA is not ready for an AWD motorcycle.

While I don't know of or about this Tarus two-wheel drive motorcycle you mentioend here, I do know of and have seen firsthand this American-designed Rokon motorcycle...

1970_rokon_trailbreaker_1569538834ef66e7

...and which began producton in New Hampshire in 1963 and is still in production to this day I understand.

(...and heck, IT'S as ugly and agricultural-looking as ANYTHING those Ruskies have ever come up with, wouldn''t ya say Sans???)  LOL

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, ElCid said:

On the other hand did the designers and the brand loyalists have too much influence in keeping the brands going past their usefulness dates?

Note: Plymouth is gone, Pontiac is gone, Oldsmobile is gone.  As for the Cadillac Coupe DeVille, not sure which model you are speaking about, but I have never found any Cadillac good looking. 

Maybe.  I was basically an "Olds guy" based mostly as I've had less mechanical problems with them than most other cars I've owned.  True too with the 2005 Chevrolet Equinox I still own and runs and rides like new.  But it of course couldn't hold it's looks  (due to Michigan winter's heavy use of road salt) so I'm soon going to look into getting it a MAACO-ver.  ;) 

NO Cadillac good looking to you?  Not even the CSX and the newer '21 and '22 models?  Or even that "iconic" '59  DeVille?   I thought the '90's Sevilles and DeVilles were fairly good looking.  But corporate designers cover too many bases and seemed to have always.  For GM you'll notice close similarities between the early to mid '50's Oldsmobile, Buick, Pontiac and Cadillac body styles.  With only minor cosmetic appointments being what separates them.    Of course, I might be  a bit biased, as I spent nearly 30 years working for GM (with my Dad supporting our family on wages earned working of it's Cadillac division for 29 years).  16 years at the old Cadillac main plant on Clark st. in Detroit,  and the rest of my time at the Livonia,MI engine plant building engines for Cadillacs until my retirement. 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Maybe.  I was basically an "Olds guy" based mostly as I've had less mechanical problems with them than most other cars I've owned.  True too with the 2005 Chevrolet Equinox I still own and runs and rides like new.  But it of course couldn't hold it's looks  (due to Michigan winter's heavy use of road salt) so I'm soon going to look into getting it a MAACO-ver.  ;) 

NO Cadillac good looking to you?  Not even the CSX and the newer '21 and '22 models?  Or even that "iconic" '59  DeVille?   I thought the '90's Sevilles and DeVilles were fairly good looking.  But corporate designers cover too many bases and seemed to have always.  For GM you'll notice close similarities between the early to mid '50's Oldsmobile, Buick, Pontiac and Cadillac body styles.  With only minor cosmetic appointments being what separates them.    Of course, I might be  a bit biased, as I spent nearly 30 years working for GM (with my Dad supporting our family on wages earned working of it's Cadillac division for 29 years).  16 years at the old Cadillac main plant on Clark st. in Detroit,  and the rest of my time at the Livonia,MI engine plant building engines for Cadillacs until my retirement. 

Sepiatone

In regard to GM's "Badge Engineering" practice:

While perusing through the Bring a Trailer website (an online auction house for classic cars and motorcycles, and one like TCM.com here, I can and offen do spend hours upon hours on) and coming upon a recently finished auction for this 1976 Cadillac Seville...

1976_cadillac_seville_pxl_20220428_14285

1976 Cadillac Seville for sale on BaT Auctions - sold for $24,250 on June 7, 2022 (Lot #75,511) | Bring a Trailer

...I was reminded that I've always thought this car as the last truly successfully designed and styled example of GM's badge engineering (basically a Chevy Nova), and because I've always thought this year Seville's bodywork so elegantly understated.

(...BUT of course, one which GM would soon ruin by adding that ugly "bustel-esque" look to its rear end)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Dargo said:

While I don't know of or about this Tarus two-wheel drive motorcycle you mentioend here, I do know of and have seen firsthand this American-designed Rokon motorcycle...

1970_rokon_trailbreaker_1569538834ef66e7

...and which began producton in New Hampshire in 1963 and is still in production to this day I understand.

(...and heck, IT'S as ugly and agricultural-looking as ANYTHING those Ruskies have ever come up with, wouldn''t ya say Sans???)  LOL

I feel that the Tarus 2x2 looks far less agricultural than it does militaristic. It seems to my mind to be vaguely reminiscent of an At-At. 

tarus-motorcycle.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Dargo said:

In regard to GM's "Badge Engineering" practice:

While perusing through the Bring a Trailer website (an online auction house for classic cars and motorcycles, and one like TCM.com here, I can and offen do spend hours upon hours on) and coming upon a recently finished auction for this 1976 Cadillac Seville...

1976_cadillac_seville_pxl_20220428_14285

1976 Cadillac Seville for sale on BaT Auctions - sold for $24,250 on June 7, 2022 (Lot #75,511) | Bring a Trailer

...I was reminded that I've always thought this car as the last truly successfully designed and styled example of GM's badge engineering (basically a Chevy Nova), and because I've always thought this year Seville's bodywork so elegantly understated.

(...BUT of course, one which GM would soon ruin by adding that ugly "bustel-esque" look to its rear end)

Yeah, Darg.

I recall when Cadillac came out with that one.  Originally they considered bringing back the LaSalle name.  But for some reason chose Seville instead.  I was still in the sheet metal division then and  one department made the engine compartment hoods for them.  2/3s of what they made was oil coated and shipped to the Seville plant in(of all places) Tehran, Iran.  When that whole Iran/hostage trouble broke out the third floor of my division was flooded with racks of unused Seville hoods.   And really the only thing "base" about it is the frame was likely the same one used for the Chevy Nova, but it's design was nowhere near  similar.   And it was the '93's Sevilles I was indicating were good looking( and FAR different looking than the one you posted up there. )  Except maybe the TST(touring sedan) which had that  "bustel-esque" rear design.  Some guys at work called it "Half-azzed" ;)   And at that time I was working at the Livonia, MI engine plant shooting pistons into the Northstar engines that went into them.

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/8/2022 at 10:44 PM, Dargo said:

And now a slight correction to my above post:

I've just remembered that CZ and Jawa motorcycles were (and still are) manufactured in what was the country of Czechoslovakia and at the time a member of the old Warsaw Pact, and with both of these m/c motorcycle companies having their wares sold in the U.S. and even during the Cold War.

(...and now I'm wondering if I might be overlooking any others here?)

 Dargo, regarding your CZ drop within the context of "Ruskie" scooters...

 Jaroslav Falta, a Czech, was notoriously denied the 1974 FIM Motocross Championship title in the 250cc class when a clique of rough Russian riders - including at least two fellow factory teammates - conspired against Falta at the final GP, helping give a Soviet the title.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              spread.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 Dargo, regarding your CZ drop within the context of "Ruskie" scooters...

 Jaroslav Falta, a Czech, was notoriously denied the 1974 FIM Motocross Championship title in the 250cc class when a clique of rough Russian riders - including at least two fellow factory teammates - conspired against Falta at the final GP, helping give a Soviet the title.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              spread.jpg

Uh-huh, SEE?!

It's by pulling cheap underhanded stunts just like THIS is the VERY reason we should NEVER allow those damn Ruskies to ever see...

EarnestTenderAmericancrocodile-small.gif

...The Big Board!!!

;)

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Uh-huh, SEE?!

It's by pulling underhanded stunts just like THIS is the VERY reason we should NEVER allow those damn Ruskies to ever see...

EarnestTenderAmericancrocodile-small.gif

...The Big Board!!!

;)

 Dargo, where are George C. Scott's generals now that we need them:  

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Cross-posted from the David Warner tribute page:

I just caught this episode of Midsomer Murders (s14e01 - 2011 Midsomer Murders (TV Series)). The episode is of particular note since it has some famous guest stars, namely Samantha Bond (Moneypenny) and David Warner star of the thread, _AND_, noted for the replacement of the former star detective with a seemingly capable (for at least 1 episode watched so far) star detective.

Warner plays a former racer as celebrity judge to exotic and sports cars, some of which would be of interest to the "That's a Nice Car" thread. BTW, I will cross-post.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...