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HEEL!


Sepiatone
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Funny, but I never gave any of my dogs that command.

 

But what this is about is the use of the word "HEEL" in many classic movies.  Usually used as a derogatory name for any man who is low of character.....

 

"You HEEL!"   "I feel like such a HEEL!"   "Don't be such a heel!"  "Time wounds all heels."

 

????

 

"HEEL" of WHAT?----The FOOT?,  A loaf of BREAD?  HOW did this word come to have such meaning?

 

Sepiatone

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In THE CAINE MUTINY during the typhoon the ship almost "heels" over (rolls onto  its side).  And yet when one wants the dog to "roll over"  you don't say "heel", you say "roll over"  . What would George Carlin have to say about this? :)   What is the distinction between "a heel" and "a cad" ?  Is this like the villain / heavy issue on another thread?

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In THE CAINE MUTINY during the typhoon the ship almost "heels" over (rolls onto  its side).  And yet when one wants the dog to "roll over"  you don't say "heel", you say "roll over"  . What would George Carlin have to say about this?

 

Don't say 'heel' to a ship?

 

As for origins, Dictionary.com has it as an Americanism deriving from the explicit s h i t-heel.  Tho the derivation appears circular, as that is described as an intensive form of heel:

 

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shitheel

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In THE CAINE MUTINY during the typhoon the ship almost "heels" over (rolls onto  its side).

 

I think the term is "keels over" referring to the keel of the ship.

 

And yes, I think the term "heel" for a cad of a guy derives from the heel being the bottom of your shoe, the lowest, dirtiest thing on your person. Eartha Kitt has a great song about "The Heel"

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In THE CAINE MUTINY during the typhoon the ship almost "heels" over (rolls onto  its side).

 

I think the term is "keels over" referring to the keel of the ship.

 

And yes, I think the term "heel" for a cad of a guy derives from the heel being the bottom of your shoe, the lowest, dirtiest thing on your person. Eartha Kitt has a great song about "The Heel"

"Keel" has also been used in terms of people-----"He keeled over from a stroke" can be heard in "THE LAST PICTURE SHOW".

 

But That bottom of the shoe explanation works for me.  But then, WHY not call them "SOLES"?  "Don't be such a "sole"."  

 

 

Sepiatone

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In THE CAINE MUTINY during the typhoon the ship almost "heels" over (rolls onto  its side).

 

I think the term is "keels over" referring to the keel of the ship.

 

 

From Merriam-Webster:

 

Definition of HEEL
 
intransitive verb
:  to lean to one side :  tip; especially of a boat or ship :  to lean temporarily (as from the action of wind or waves) — compare list
transitive verb
:  to cause (a boat) to heel
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How about the term "wolf" to describe a predatory male?  It is used twice in 1959's "Middle of the Night" to describe Frederick March's intentions toward Kim Novak.  When did "wolf" go out of style?

 

There term wolf to describe a predatory male went out of style when Little Red RidingHood did.  

 

Now the term for a predatory male is college student.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heel_%28professional_wrestling%29

 

In professional wrestling, a heel (also known as a rudo in lucha libre) is a wrestler who is villainous or a "bad guy", who is booked (scripted) by the promotion to be in the position of being an antagonist.[1][2][3]

They are typically opposed by their polar opposites, faces, who are heroic or "good guy" characters. In order to gain heat (boos), heels are often portrayed as behaving in an immoral manner, breaking rules or otherwise taking advantage of their opponents outside the bounds of the rules of the match. Others do not (or rarely) break rules but instead exhibit unlikeable, appalling and deliberately offensive and demoralizing personality traits. No matter the type of heel, the most important job is that of the antagonist role. Heels exist to provide a foil to the face wrestlers. If a given heel is cheered over the face, a promoter may opt to turn that heel to face, or to make the wrestler do something even more despicable to encourage heel heat.

 

The term "heel" is most likely derived from a slang usage of the word that first appeared around 1914, meaning "contemptible person."[citation needed] Common heel behavior includes cheating to win (e.g., using the ropes for leverage while pinning or attacking with foreign objects while the referee is looking away), employing dirty tactics like blatant chokes or raking the eyes, attacking other wrestlers backstage, interfering with other wrestlers' matches, insulting the fans (referred to as "cheap heat"), and acting in a haughty or superior manner.[4]

Occasionally, faces who have recently turned from being heels will still exhibit characteristics from their heel persona. [5] This occurs due to fans being entertained by a wrestler despite (or because of) their 'heel' persona, often due to the performer's charisma or charm in playing the role. Certain wrestlers such as Ric Flair and Eddie Guerrero gained popularity as faces by using tactics that would typically be associated with heels, while others like Stone Cold Steve Austin and CM Punk displayed 'heelish' behavior through most of their careers yet got huge face reactions, leading them to be marketed as anti-heroes.

On other occasions, wrestlers who are positioned as faces receive a negative audience reaction despite their portrayal as heroes. The term 'heel' does not describe a typical set of attributes or audience reaction, but simply a wrestler's presentation and booking as an antagonist.

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As long as you brought up professional wrestling; in boxing to "heel" another fighter is to rub the laces of the glove over your opponent's face.  This could cause or open up cuts.

 

I have read where some boxers used to tamper with the laces beforehand in order to make them more abrasive.

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In THE CAINE MUTINY during the typhoon the ship almost "heels" over (rolls onto  its side).  And yet when one wants the dog to "roll over"  you don't say "heel", you say "roll over"  . What would George Carlin have to say about this? :)   What is the distinction between "a heel" and "a cad" ?  Is this like the villain / heavy issue on another thread?

Just winging this one, isn't a "cad" one who has specifically treated WOMEN badly, while a "heel" may have treated ANYONE badly?

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In THE CAINE MUTINY during the typhoon the ship almost "heels" over (rolls onto  its side).  And yet when one wants the dog to "roll over"  you don't say "heel", you say "roll over"  . What would George Carlin have to say about this? :)   What is the distinction between "a heel" and "a cad" ?  Is this like the villain / heavy issue on another thread?

 

Saaaay, speaking of THE CAINE MUTINY and "heels"...isn't THAT pretty much what Fred MacMurray ACTUALLY was in that flick???

 

Yep, thaaaat's RIGHT! Ol' Fred was more a "heel" and NOT so much a "villain" OR a "heavy"!!!

 

(...anybody feel like disagreein' with me here?...I mean, didn't we have SO much "fun" with this whole thing just a while back???!!!) LOL

 

;)

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Just winging this one, isn't a "cad" one who has specifically treated WOMEN badly, while a "heel" may have treated ANYONE badly?

DGF, I was just about to come on here and say the same thing.  I see that you've already responded.  I concur that a heel is someone who is just rude and nasty toward people in general and a cad is usually a man who fails to display gentlemanly manners toward women.  I always think of a cad as not being someone who is openly rude and nasty; but someone who presents themselves as smooth and charming; but then will turn around and openly flirt with another woman while on a date with another woman or conveniently forgets his wallet while out on a date (that he invited the woman on) so that his date has to pay and things like that. 

 

Typically "heel" and "cad" are adjectives assigned to men.  Women who act in this manner, I imagine get labeled a "b itch."

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Typically "heel" and "cad" are adjectives assigned to men.  Women who act in this manner, I imagine get labeled a "b itch."

 

Well, yeah, maybe Speedy.

 

However, before I retired, we working stiffs would USUALLY just refer to people like this as "Corporate Types"! ;)

 

(...and REGARDLESS their gender)

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How about the term "wolf" to describe a predatory male?  It is used twice in 1959's "Middle of the Night" to describe Frederick March's intentions toward Kim Novak.  When did "wolf" go out of style?

i always enjoy the Rex Avery "wolves"

But then there's that "Wolf of Wall Street" - but I guess he was a different critter altogether!

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AND, word is the term "wolf" may soon once AGAIN become part of our common lexicon to describe a "predatory male" and after the recent joint effort between the U.S. Dept of The Interior and The City of Los Angeles and their placing a small pack of the formerly indigenous Hollywood Wolf( Canis lupus cinematicus ) along a stretch of Highland Ave just north of Franklin, and with the hope that they will eventually increase in numbers and migrate in a southeasterly direction toward Grauman's Chinese Theater.


 


(...or whatever the hell they're callin' that Chinese Theater now days anyway!)


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About the word "cad" , we all agree that our beloved George Sanders practically defined the term for movie roles. And in a film like REBECCA good old George treated everyone equally badly.   So what is the worst,  most derogatory remark one can make, villain, heavy, cad , heel, ....?  I have it, an UPSTART! :D

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About the word "cad" , we all agree that our beloved George Sanders practically defined the term for movie roles. And in a film like REBECCA good old George treated everyone equally badly.   So what is the worst,  most derogatory remark one can make, villain, heavy, cad , heel, ....?  I have it, an UPSTART! :D

 

"UPSTART?! Did I just hear someone say 'UPSTART'?"

 

duck-soup.jpg

 

"You realize of course that this means WAR!"

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DGF, I was just about to come on here and say the same thing.  I see that you've already responded.  I concur that a heel is someone who is just rude and nasty toward people in general and a cad is usually a man who fails to display gentlemanly manners toward women.  I always think of a cad as not being someone who is openly rude and nasty; but someone who presents themselves as smooth and charming; but then will turn around and openly flirt with another woman while on a date with another woman or conveniently forgets his wallet while out on a date (that he invited the woman on) so that his date has to pay and things like that. 

 

Typically "heel" and "cad" are adjectives assigned to men.  Women who act in this manner, I imagine get labeled a "b itch."

..or  a ****.

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How about the term "wolf" to describe a predatory male?  It is used twice in 1959's "Middle of the Night" to describe Frederick March's intentions toward Kim Novak.  When did "wolf" go out of style?

"Wolf" probably went out of style when people figured the word "LECH" was more fitting.

 

Besides, I've seen several wolves in zoos over the years, and saw several documentaries about them and a few Disney features about wolves, and not ONCE in ANY of them, or in ANY zoo setting, have I ever heard any wolf WHISTLE! 

 

 

Sepiatone

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