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I have the heebie jeebies watching The Hanging Tree


clore
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He's actually not bad there, in his patented role as the trouble-making weakling relative. The climax IIRC was an unconvincing fistfight between him and Janssen.

 

I'll have to admit to having forgotten about that. When this episode popped up on Me-TV maybe six months ago, I watched a few minutes of it and tuned out. As we've discussed before, I'm not partial to the color ones save for perhaps three, but this one was one that ranked low on my scale anyway. Nice that they got a guest star on the level of Celeste Holm, too bad it was so mediocre.

 

I am looking forward to A NIGHT OF ADVENTURE in an hour. By coincidence, it will be the fifth film that I'll have seen in the last week that has a Crane Wilbur connection.

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I'll have to admit to having forgotten about that. When this episode popped up on Me-TV maybe six months ago, I watched a few minutes of it and tuned out. As we've discussed before, I'm not partial to the color ones save for perhaps three, but this one was one that ranked low on my scale anyway. Nice that they got a guest star on the level of Celeste Holm, too bad it was so mediocre.

 

"The Old Man Picked a Lemon" was in B&W. You must have it confused with another episode.

 

I recall it was OK -- not great, but not bad. It's one of those episodes where if the heavy (BP) had just minded his own business, there would've been no story. lol

 

The biggest problem with "Lemon" was that it wasted Holm. IIRC she later did a color episode with Jack Warden, so she had to share the spotlight there too. She deserved an episode to herself.

 

Looking over BP's filmography, I'm reminded he was in the only Defenders episode I've seen, where the liberal crusaders defend the free speech rights of a neo-nazi (a not completely convincing Ben). The Defenders did yet another neo-nazi episode, starring Dennis Hopper. I've only seen a brief clip from it, where Hopper is on trial and causes a spectacle in the courtroom.

 

Hopper claimed that the episode was seen by Charles Manson, who admitted basing his own courtroom antics on those of Hopper's character.

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Ah, you're right - it must have been the one with Warden that I turned off. But while perhaps confusing the hues (or lack of them), I did tune out of the other one. Too many times the series had those Kimble is hired by a gardener/chauffeur/handyman and one member of the family wants what another member of the family has and will knock off that party and put the blame on Kimble because he just happened to pick up a crime mag with Kimble's picture in it. The one with Roy Thinnes stands out in my mind as the worst using this formula or some variation.

 

That's why I stopped at just buying season one of the show. The diminishing returns of the successive seasons as I saw with my Me-TV viewings, has me wishing that I could download (for a fee) selected episodes rather than have to purchase a whole season when maybe at best there are maybe eight each from seasons two and three that I would watch.

 

It would be the same for my beloved 77 Sunset Strip - I've got about 80 of them and there are only perhaps two dozen (if that many) that I would watch again. Which isn't to say that its bad TV, just not up to the best of the series.

 

I wonder if Johnny Cochran saw A NIGHT OF ADVENTURE - they just had a scene with a glove that anticipated "if the glove don't fit..."

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I'm different, as my name suggests. I'll watch any Fugitive except for the really awful ones (the Odd Couple precursor at the end of season one -- who wants comedy on the Fugitive?). It's like a serialized Victorian novel. Crossed with Kabuki threatre. You just have to accept all the conventions: Kimble can always get a job; he'll be recognized; a beautiful woman will fall in love with him; Lt Gerard will somehow learn where he is; Despite all evidence pointing to him as a murderer, Kimble will convince people to help him; he will make hair's breadth escape before the final commercial.

 

Sometimes I wonder if the plots even matter. It's the atmosphere of paranoia that's important. Certainly there's never been another TV series like The Fugitive -- it's a never-ending film noir.

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I'm different, as my name suggests. I'll watch any Fugitive except for the really awful ones (the Odd Couple precursor at the end of season one -- who wants comedy on the Fugitive?).

 

That's what I love about horse racing and entertainment - everyone gets to make their own choices. I get a kick out of that episode because it is so unique in the series and reminds me on NYC's Collyer brothers. And mind you, I have a very low tolerance for John McGiver. I also like the one with Pamela Tiffin because there's never any threat to Kimble so again it veers a bit from what's expected.

 

But I have seen them all in the initial ABC run, both the nighttime and daytime runs. Plus 25 years later on A&E.

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That's what I love about horse racing and entertainment - everyone gets to make their own choices. I get a kick out of that episode because it is so unique in the series and reminds me on NYC's Collyer brothers. And mind you, I have a very low tolerance for John McGiver.

 

I like McGiver but hate that episode. I think it's totally out of place in Kimbleland. It's like mating The Egg amd I with The Big Combo.

 

 I also like the one with Pamela Tiffin because there's never any threat to Kimble so again it veers a bit from what's expected.

 

I've read people describe "The Girl From Little Egypt" (a must-see for the murder and trial flashbacks) that way, but I don't really see it like that. I still get a sense of vulnerability from Kimble, even if there is no directly stated threat to him.

 

TGFLE is also a must see for Pamela Tiffin (rawr!)

 

But I have seen them all in the initial ABC run, both the nighttime and daytime runs. Plus 25 years later on A&E.

 

I'd never seen the show until after midway in its A&E run. It became my favorite TV drama. I didn't watch it for quite a while after that, then a few years ago went on a viewing spell. I was pleasantly surprised at how well it holds up. It's actually pretty timeless, existing in its own little universe.

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It's only the technology that dates the show, the drama for the most part is timeless. I recall when CBS had a remake of the show with Tim Daly. I gave the show a year - if that - because I didn't expect that in the internet age and the era of America's Most Wanted that the concept would hold up. Not for a guy who's going to move from town-to-town helping others while pursuing his wife's killer. Even the just captured Eric Frein knew better than to move about and just stay hidden among the terrain he knew best, the Pocono mountains.

 

The Harrison Ford film worked because they confined it to only a few days.

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