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Any ideas what films will be shown for 31 Days of Oscar?


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We should be getting the February schedule soon.  We know that most of Elia Kazan's films will air. All the films where Deborah Kerr was nominated will air. Both of Liz Taylor's Oscar films will air.

 

But what about some of the others?

 

I think they should show MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (Ingrid's supporting actress award). It's been ages.

 

Also, a fun theme might be nominations for the least amount of screen time. 

 

Let's hope they get really creative, especially if they are trotting out the usual suspects...

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When you say 'we know' is this because TCM has said so or because that has been their pattern in the past?

 

Hey, I'm not disputing what you said,  since I do recall seeing the Kazan and Kerr films during Oscar month  (e.g. it is a very safe bet On The Waterfront will be shown).  

 

Anyhow,  I do hope they get more creative and that means NOT trotting out the usual suspects (well at least to a lesser degree).

 

I like how last year they focused on a category and showed films associated with that category;  e.g. Oscar nominiated actresses from 194X.

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Let's hope they get really creative, especially if they are trotting out the usual suspects...

That would be awesome if TCM aired "The Usual Suspects", one of my faves!   :rolleyes:

Yeah, it's not gonna happen, but it's nice to dream once in a while.  LA Confidential would be another good flick to show.

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I don't think this is such an awful schedule. In fact, I think some of the selections are very good. I know it is scandalous to say so around these parts, but I'm pleased to see the inclusion of some more modern classics. CHICAGO (2002) and THE KING'S SPEECH (2010), for example, are most deserving of being aired on TCM, in my opinion.

 

Oh, and my guess would be that the March 2015 Star of the Month will NOT be Gregory Peck, seeing as how so many of his best films are airing in February (GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT (1947), TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH (1949), and ROMAN HOLIDAY (1953) among others).

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I don't think this is such an awful schedule. In fact, I think some of the selections are very good. I know it is scandalous to say so around these parts, but I'm pleased to see the inclusion of some more modern classics. CHICAGO (2002) and THE KING'S SPEECH (2010), for example, are most deserving of being aired on TCM, in my opinion.

 

Oh, and my guess would be that the March 2015 Star of the Month will NOT be Gregory Peck, seeing as how so many of his best films are airing in February (GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT (1947), TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH (1949), and ROMAN HOLIDAY (1953) among others).

Unless they have leased those Gregory Peck films for a three month period, in which case, he could be SOTM in April. The fact that they have brought ROMAN HOLIDAY back (an expensive rarity from Paramount) tells me they're going to do something more with that.

 

By the way, there is another category here we haven't addressed yet.  It's the Films-That-Only-Air-During-Oscar-Month that are in the Turner Library. We only see John Ford's THE INFORMER during this month. 

 

Plus there are non-Turner titles that only play during Oscar time, too. Titles like ALL THE KING'S MEN; IN COLD BLOOD and A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS. But if you miss them, you will be able to see them again like clockwork in February Two O One Six.

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I haven't been this riled up about a schedule in a long time (and not in a positive way unfortunately).

 

Way way way way way tooooooooooo many post-code movies on this schedule.

 

imgres30.jpg

 

You apparently can not count. Yes, there are a lot of post code films on the schedule. But if you look at the raw numbers, something you don't do, 63% of all the movies being shown for 31 Days are from 1959 and back. Only 37% of the films are being shown from 1960 forwards.

 

 

And being that 31 Days of Oscar has always celebrated the Academy Awards, and TCM has always shown newer films on their schedule, I find that 37% is an acceptable figure. Maybe James would disagree as you have indicated. A typical month sees no more than 20 to 30% of post code films on the schedule.

 

So these figures are not too bad.

 

The breakdown is this:

 

1920's:    5 films

 

1930's:  64 films

 

1940's:  78 films

 

1950's:  69 films

 

for a total of 216 films or 63% of the total.

 

1960's:   65 films

 

1970's:   30 films

 

1980's:   17 films

 

1990's:     7 films

 

2000's:     6 films

 

2010's:     2 films

 

for a total of 127 films or 37% of the total.

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You apparently can not count. Yes, there are a lot of post code films on the schedule. But if you look at the raw numbers, something you don't do, 63% of all the movies being shown for 31 Days are from 1959 and back. Only 37% of the films are being shown from 1960 forwards.

 

 

And being that 31 Days of Oscar has always celebrated the Academy Awards, and TCM has always shown newer films on their schedule, I find that 37% is an acceptable figure. Maybe James would disagree as you have indicated. A typical month sees no more than 20 to 30% of post code films on the schedule.

 

So these figures are not too bad.

 

The breakdown is this:

 

1920's:    5 films

 

1930's:  64 films

 

1940's:  78 films

 

1950's:  69 films

 

for a total of 216 films or 63% of the total.

 

1960's:   65 films

 

1970's:   30 films

 

1980's:   17 films

 

1990's:     7 films

 

2000's:     6 films

 

2010's:     2 films

 

for a total of 127 films or 37% of the total.

 

That 63% figure actually overestimates the percentage of post-code films, since the "code" didn't really evaporate until the late 1960's when the ratings system took over.  Films like Last Tango in Paris never could have been shown in U.S. theaters in the mid-60's.

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You apparently can not count. Yes, there are a lot of post code films on the schedule. But if you look at the raw numbers, something you don't do, 63% of all the movies being shown for 31 Days are from 1959 and back. Only 37% of the films are being shown from 1960 forwards.

 

 

And being that 31 Days of Oscar has always celebrated the Academy Awards, and TCM has always shown newer films on their schedule, I find that 37% is an acceptable figure. Maybe James would disagree as you have indicated. A typical month sees no more than 20 to 30% of post code films on the schedule.

 

So these figures are not too bad.

 

The breakdown is this:

 

1920's:    5 films

 

1930's:  64 films

 

1940's:  78 films

 

1950's:  69 films

 

for a total of 216 films or 63% of the total.

 

1960's:   65 films

 

1970's:   30 films

 

1980's:   17 films

 

1990's:     7 films

 

2000's:     6 films

 

2010's:     2 films

 

for a total of 127 films or 37% of the total.

 

Thanks for these stats.    I understand that during Oscar month TCM does show more post 1968 films than they typically do the other 11 months.    My 80% wish was only a general target and I believe TCM gets close to that for the overall year even with the increase in post 1968 movies during Oscar month.    

 

I also understand why TCM has Oscar month.   The Oscars are a well known 'brand' and therefore useful marketing tool.

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...the percentage of post-code films.

It has nothing to do with percentages. Apologists are going to try to be scientific and use data they can manipulate to suit their arguments. It's about the fact that these films show up at all. Every time a film from 1980 or 1990 or 2000 or 2010 is played, that is one less film from 1930 or 1940 or 1950 that gets a chance to see the light of day. So disappointed in TCM's programmers for this dreadful schedule.

 

Yeah, this just isn't acceptable to me. It is like they are using Oscar to introduce these later films into the schedule, and then will find ways to create primetime themes later where they can rebroadcast them. In my opinion, there should not be any films from the 2010's on this schedule. Where's the idea, said by many apologists before, that TCM broadcasts films from past decades. No longer the case, baby doll.

 

I still haven't seen anyone look at the issue I mentioned about Republic films and other golden age of Hollywood films where there were Oscar nominations (films TCM is not playing). We are just stampeding past those now in our mad rush to air films from the 2010's and beyond. It's ridiculous. This channel has now officially jumped the shark.

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I would hardly call that schedule "jumping the shark" as they have most of the movies from the classic era after all. TCM is limited by the Oscars in what they can show, and it is hard to be "fresh" when it is the same movies with the same Oscar nominations every year. TCM has had a ton of precode movies in the last couple of months, precode junkies probably OD's on them.

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I would hardly call that schedule "jumping the shark" as they have most of the movies from the classic era after all. TCM is limited by the Oscars in what they can show, and it is hard to be "fresh" when it is the same movies with the same Oscar nominations every year. TCM has had a ton of precode movies in the last couple of months, precode junkies probably OD's on them.

I think they did that to offset this February schedule, one of the worst in a long time. I repeat, any time they show a film from the later decades it is one less film they will show from the golden age of Hollywood. It's an insult to viewers who are fans of the golden age of Hollywood. This would be expected on other cable channels-- now et tu Brute,TCM?

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That 63% figure actually overestimates the percentage of post-code films, since the "code" didn't really evaporate until the late 1960's when the ratings system took over.  Films like Last Tango in Paris never could have been shown in U.S. theaters in the mid-60's.

 

Your point is well taken. The reason I use 1960 as the beginning of the count for post code films is simple. There are plenty of fans of TCM who write here that they find anything shown on TCM made after 1960 to be something of a problem. The problem for them as well as TopBilled (according to his latest post) is that TCM is a "classic" movie channel and therefore should "only" show insert year here on their schedule.

 

Even though the Hays Code existed well into 1968, many films by that time were being made contrary to their rigorous guidelines. The movie industry was well on it's way to different film making by the mid 1950's, but for many studio's I think that they simply thought they needed to make films using the Hays Code's guidelines and rules. Some studios obviously did not, where as others were still clinging onto the Hays Code guidleines. Over-simplification? Probably.

 

So, yes I would agree that for the most part the Hays Code went away in 1968 but in reality many films made during the early to late 1960's (before 1968) were already much differently filmed than what the Hays Code allowed. So I have included 1960 as the break for so-called Code films, and everything later is post Code. This is MHO, of course. Plus it makes it easier to count the sixties as a whole decade instead of just breaking the decade into two parts, one from 1960 to 1967 and the other from 1968 though the end of 1969.

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When the OD'd precode junkies rehabilitate then Oscar month will be over and they can get their fix then,lol. Seriously you have to allow the channel to show more recent movies or it will go the way of the Dodo.

 

I remember when the radio had tons of classic rock stations, those all went away too. Allow TCM to show all the years and it will be around longer, they have plenty of classic movies in Oscar month as it is.

 

And the more modern movies could be hooks to get new viewers interested in classic movies. Let's be positive about this.

 

;)

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When the OD'd precode junkies rehabilitate then Oscar month will be over and they can get their fix then,lol. Seriously you have to allow the channel to show more recent movies or it will go the way of the Dodo.

 

I remember when the radio had tons of classic rock stations, those all went away too. Allow TCM to show all the years and it will be around longer, they have plenty of classic movies in Oscar month as it is.

 

And the more modern movies could be hooks to get new viewers interested in classic movies. Let's be positive about this.

 

;)

This is an easy post to pick apart. I do not want to be too mean. I am sure readers can figure out the flaws in the logic of the above post.

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This is an easy post to pick apart. I do not want to be too mean. I am sure readers can figure out the flaws in the logic of the above post.

 

This is not only unbelievable, but in many ways downright mean, as you have written...

 

The moment someone makes what they consider a thoughtful response, you come along and make it sound like the guy is failing in your film studies class. How pathetic it must be that many of the posts written here do not obviously match with your style and or percieved substance.

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This is not only unbelievable, but in many ways downright mean, as you have written...

 

The moment someone makes what they consider a thoughtful response, you come along and make it sound like the guy is failing in your film studies class. How pathetic it must be that many of the posts written here do not obviously match with your style and or percieved substance.

Is it really necessary for you to chime in and be mean yourself? I do not see where you are setting a better example. :)

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This is not only unbelievable, but in many ways downright mean, as you have written...

 

The moment someone makes what they consider a thoughtful response, you come along and make it sound like the guy is failing in your film studies class.

 

Yep. It's typically abusive.

 

And yet, I don't see MovieMadness being so chickensh!t as to report it. There's only one bully in these forums that uses that tactic. Hopefully the authority here will catch on soon.

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Is it really necessary for you to chime in and be mean yourself? I do not see where you are setting a better example honey lamb chop. :)

 

Well Professor, I am not the one who goes around chastising people for what they may think are well-meaning and thoughtful comments.

 

I see where you have now edited your original comment to me. I wonder why that is?

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Your point is well taken. The reason I use 1960 as the beginning of the count for post code films is simple. There are plenty of fans of TCM who write here that they find anything shown on TCM made after 1960 to be something of a problem. The problem for them as well as TopBilled (according to his latest post) is that TCM is a "classic" movie channel and therefore should "only" show insert year here on their schedule.

 

Even though the Hays Code existed well into 1968, many films by that time were being made contrary to their rigorous guidelines. The movie industry was well on it's way to different film making by the mid 1950's, but for many studio's I think that they simply thought they needed to make films using the Hays Code's guidelines and rules. Some studios obviously did not, where as others were still clinging onto the Hays Code guidleines. Over-simplification? Probably.

 

So, yes I would agree that for the most part the Hays Code went away in 1968 but in reality many films made during the early to late 1960's (before 1968) were already much differently filmed than what the Hays Code allowed. So I have included 1960 as the break for so-called Code films, and everything later is post Code. This is MHO, of course. Plus it makes it easier to count the sixties as a whole decade instead of just breaking the decade into two parts, one from 1960 to 1967 and the other from 1968 though the end of 1969.

 

I understand your reasoning, and I was more trying to reinforce your point. My recollection of the final nail in the Hays Code's putrid coffin was I Am Curious: Yellow, a thoroughly trite movie that nevertheless was the first real crack in the armor of the intercourse taboo. Before that, it's clear that the code was getting chipped away in bits and pieces. First you had the cynicism and amorality in many of the noir films that were absent from the previous Breen era gangster movies of the "Rocky Dies Yellow" stripe.  After that, you had all sorts of sexual tension in many of the 50's features like Vertigo and Baby Doll that wouldn't have been allowed outside of the B-circuit in previous decades.  And then you had the wholly cynical takes on authority embodied in such films as Dr. Strangelove.  It didn't happen all at once, and all the pieces of the Breen code hadn't even fallen by the late 60's, but by the time the ratings system came along it was more of an acknowledgement of reality than any radical shift.  I've always viewed the post-code films as more of a continuity from the 60's than a real break, even though if you compare today's movies to those of 1969 and skip all the countless transitional movies that came in between, it may not seem that way.

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I understand your reasoning, and I was more trying to reinforce your point. My recollection of the final nail in the Hays Code's putrid coffin was I Am Curious: Yellow, a thoroughly trite movie that nevertheless was the first real crack in the armor of the intercourse taboo. Before that, it's clear that the code was getting chipped away in bits and pieces. First you had the cynicism and amorality in many of the noir films that were absent from the previous Breen era gangster movies of the "Rocky Dies Yellow" stripe.  After that, you had all sorts of sexual tension in many of the 50's features like Vertigo and Baby Doll that wouldn't have been allowed outside of the B-circuit in previous decades.  And then you had the wholly cynical takes on authority embodied in such films as Dr. Strangelove.  It didn't happen all at once, and all the pieces of the Breen code hadn't even fallen by the late 60's, but by the time the ratings system came along it was more of an acknowledgement of reality than any radical shift.  I've always viewed the post-code films as more of a continuity from the 60's than a real break, even though if you compare today's movies to those of 1969 and skip all the countless transitional movies that came in between, it may not seem that way.

 

'Reflections in a Golden Eye' in 1967 was the first movie that was obvious in its theme of homosexuality - a breakage from the "code".

 

Although the code may have technically met its demise in 1968 (or was it '69?), the truth is that movie-makers were aggressively pushing against it, and defying it, for several years. I detected it's growing loss of influence in the movies of 1966 onward, 1965 being the last year where it was really still observed with true obedience. And even then, a British movie called 'The Collector' had broken the code that year (apparently by accident when the individual appraising it for the ratings board - an elderly gentleman - dozed off during the viewing and missed noticing that the antagonist gets away with his crime).

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