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DownGoesFrazier

Females in Rock

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I'm typing this while not even sure I can come UP with ten!

 

 

Paper Tiger---Sue Thompson

 

Barracuda--Heart

 

Try--Janis Joplin

 

Angel Baby--Rosie and the Originals

 

Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow--Shirelles

 

Sally Go 'Round the Roses---Jaynettes

 

Baby It's You---Smith

 

Proud Mary---Tina Turner

 

Sepiatone

Except for Heart, not even close to any overlap. Not surprising. I know you're not a "new wave" guy.

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From the largely masculin domain of Heavy Metal there's Girlschool.

 

After 35 years they're still rocking, still touring, and still the best. They may be grandmothers now but they can still bring the house down.

 

God bless you ladies.

 

Girlschool - Race With Devil

 

Girlschool - Take it all away

 

Best wishes
Metairie Road

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My personal dirtee dozen.

 

Sunday Girl~Blondie

Moonchild~Cibo Matto

Happy Home~Garbage

Rock Star~Hole

Fade Into You~Mazzy Star

Adult Books~X

Femme Fatale~Velvet Underground

My City Was Gone~The Pretenders

Untogether~Belly

Walking on a Wire~Richard and Linda Thompson

Saints~The Breeders

Blue Light~Mazzy Star

Blondie's "Hangin' on the Telephone" comes close to my top 10. So does the B52s' "Give Me Back My Man".

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Except for Heart, not even close to any overlap. Not surprising. I know you're(Sepiatone) not a "new wave" guy.

 

Neither am I so much, DGF. I'm more of a Heart and a Pretenders lover too.

 

However, I DID always like this New Wave ditty here...

 

 

(...btw, I loved one of the comments made in this YouTube page's comment section: "I'm old enough to remember when Lady Gaga was called Dale Bozzio") 

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Neither am I so much, DGF. I'm more of a Heart and a Pretenders lover too.

 

However, I DID always like this New Wave ditty here...

 

 

(...btw, I loved one of the comments made in this YouTube page's comment section: "I'm old enough to remember when Lady Gaga was called Dale Bozzio") 

Uh, NO group was more "new wave" than the Pretenders.

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Uh, NO group was more "new wave" than the Pretenders.

 

HUH?! Though I'm no musicologist, I don't get that statement at all, DGF. And far as I know or have ever thought of Chrissie and her band, they've always been considered more a flat out "Rock" band than "New Wave" by most.

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HUH?! Though I'm no musicologist, I don't get that statement at all, DGF. And far as I know or have ever thought of Chrissie and her band, they've always been considered more a flat out "Rock" band than "New Wave" by most.

I beg to differ. When "new Wave" began and peaked in 1978-1981, the most famous and most successful acts of the genre were considered to be the Police, Elvis Costello, the Talking Heads, and the Pretenders. Fast forward to 2014, and on Sirius XM First Wave, (classic alternative, i.e., New Wave), The LP's "Pretenders", "Pretenders II", and "Learning to Crawl", are prime sources of songs for their playlists.

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I beg to differ. When "new Wave" began and peaked in 1978-1981, the most famous and most successful acts of the genre were considered to be the Police, Elvis Costello, the Talking Heads, and the Pretenders. Fast forward to 2014, and on Sirius XM First Wave, (classic alternative, i.e., New Wave), The LP's "Pretenders", "Pretenders II", and "Learning to Crawl", are prime sources of songs for their playlists.

 

None of that really matters DGF.  I mean, if MADONNA can get inducted into the ROCK'n'ROLL hall of fame, it's clear these dips DON'T always know what's what, OR what they're doing!

 

By YOUR timeline, one would have to consider that "Punk" and "New Wave" are synonymous.  Now, I can't be sure, but I doubt that THE SEX PISTOLS would appreciate being lumped in the same box with HAIRCUT 100 and THE THOMPSON TWINS.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I beg to differ. When "new Wave" began and peaked in 1978-1981, the most famous and most successful acts of the genre were considered to be the Police, Elvis Costello, the Talking Heads, and the Pretenders. Fast forward to 2014, and on Sirius XM First Wave, (classic alternative, i.e., New Wave), The LP's "Pretenders", "Pretenders II", and "Learning to Crawl", are prime sources of songs for their playlists.

 

What this tells me:  New Wave is NOT a genre of music,  but instead just a term for ROCK bands that were 'new' to the scene in the late 70s \ early 80s.

 

Alternative is a sub-genre of rock music.    I do understand why Sirius would have to create sub-sub-sub genres as a way to separate rock music but at the end of the day these are just made up classifications to break up rock music.   

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What this tells me:  New Wave is NOT a genre of music,  but instead just a term for ROCK bands that were 'new' to the scene in the late 70s \ early 80s.

 

Alternative is a sub-genre of rock music.    I do understand why Sirius would have to create sub-sub-sub genres as a way to separate rock music but at the end of the day these are just made up classifications to break up rock music.   

 

Good point. James. However, what I was thinkin' when I made that comment to DGF was the idea that, and while I may only be familiar with The Pretenders' bigger hits which receive large airplay, I don't recall their sound being one of a great use of the Synthesizer and just as the group I think of as a prime example of "New Wave"(Missing Persons) did and was known for and which I posted that video of earlier.

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Good point. James. However, what I was thinkin' when I made that comment to DGF was the idea that, and while I may only be familiar with The Pretenders' bigger hits which receive large airplay, I don't recall their sound being one of a great use of the Synthesizer and just as the group I think of as a prime example of "New Wave"(Missing Persons) did and was known for and which I posted that video of earlier.

 

I view the Pretenders as a rock band because they have a very standard rock set up; 2 guitars, a bass and drums.   Some keyboards from time to time but not that synth sound required for folks that don't know how to listen to a bass line and therefore require a melody line all the time!    

 

That being said, using Sirius as a defacto standard for music classification is as good as any.     When I got my new car it came free for a few months.   One of the things I found interesting was picking one of their classification just to see what type of music they put in it;  e.g  classic alterative!   At first that made ZERO sense to me but after hearing the bands and songs played there I got what they were getting at.

 

I found their jazz breakdowns to be very lame but I didn't expect much to begin with.

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What this tells me:  New Wave is NOT a genre of music,  but instead just a term for ROCK bands that were 'new' to the scene in the late 70s \ early 80s.

 

Alternative is a sub-genre of rock music.    I do understand why Sirius would have to create sub-sub-sub genres as a way to separate rock music but at the end of the day these are just made up classifications to break up rock music.   

Not true. I was going to the dance clubs when I was living in NYC in that period. The "new wave" bands were played in clubs like the Mudd Club, Danceteria. etc. The straight rock bands were not. One criterion, I guess, were that the New Wave bands were considered danceable (the dancing was different from disco dancing)....... Also, many rock bands began in that period which were NEVER classified as "new Wave". Bon Jovi is just one example.

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Good point. James. However, what I was thinkin' when I made that comment to DGF was the idea that, and while I may only be familiar with The Pretenders' bigger hits which receive large airplay, I don't recall their sound being one of a great use of the Synthesizer and just as the group I think of as a prime example of "New Wave"(Missing Persons) did and was known for and which I posted that video of earlier.

On Sirius XM First Wave, one of the on-air promos they use is, "Sometimes guitars, sometimes synthesizers, always classic alternative". Synthesizers are not a requirement.

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On Sirius XM First Wave, one of the on-air promos they use is, "Sometimes guitars, sometimes synthesizers, always classic alternative". Synthesizers are not a requirement.

 

Hmmmm....well DGF, and not that I'm suggesting here that Wikipedia is the "final arbiter" of all things in the world, but I find it a little telling anyway that when one goes to the Wiki page of each of these musical groups, it starts out by defining each of these as:

 

"Missing Persons is an American band that plays a blend of new wave and hard rock. The band was founded in 1980 in Los Angeles by guitarist Warren Cuccurullo, vocalistDale Bozzio, and drummer Terry Bozzio. They went on to add bassist Patrick O'Hearnand keyboardist Chuck Wild."

 

...and...

 

"Pretenders are an English-American rock band formed in Hereford, England, in March 1978. The original band comprised initiator and main songwriter Chrissie Hynde (lead vocals, rhythm guitar), James Honeyman-Scott (lead guitar, backing vocals, keyboards), Pete Farndon (bass guitar, backing vocals)..."

 

And so, while I will definitely take what you and that satellite DJ said about this into consideration, I'm sorry to say I still have some small reservations about this "New Wave" nomenclature used to define Chrissie and her band's primary genre.

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Pretenders did emerge from the punk/new wave movement (that movement itself beginning in the UK).

 

New Wave became such a broad term that it has been called "virtually meaningless" by The New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock.

 

Wiki's first paragraph on 'New Wave Music' begins:

New wave music is an umbrella term for several late-1970s to mid-1980s pop/rock musical styles with ties to 1970s punk rock.The wide range of bands categorized under this term has been a source of much confusion and controversy. The new wave sound of the late 1970s moved away from the smooth blues and rock & roll sounds to create music with a twitchy, agitated feel, choppy rhythm guitars and fast tempos. Initially new wave was broadly analogous to punk rock before branching as a distinctly identified genre, incorporating electronic/experimental music, mod, disco and pop. It subsequently engendered subgenres and fusions, including New Romantic and goth rock.

 

The Wiki article goes on extensively and makes for an interesting read.

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Thanks for the reply here, dark.

 

And so it seems, and as I believe it was James who in this thread at first posited a similar thought to what Wiki says here...attempting to quantify all the "sub-terminology" to describe all the various "sub-genres" in "Rock" music, is and can be a very nebulous endeavor to undertake. 

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Hmmmm....well DGF, and not that I'm suggesting here that Wikipedia is the "final arbiter" of all things in the world, but I find it a little telling anyway that when one goes to the Wiki page of each of these musical groups, it starts out by defining each of these as:

 

"Missing Persons is an American band that plays a blend of new wave and hard rock. The band was founded in 1980 in Los Angeles by guitarist Warren Cuccurullo, vocalistDale Bozzio, and drummer Terry Bozzio. They went on to add bassist Patrick O'Hearnand keyboardist Chuck Wild."

 

...and...

 

"Pretenders are an English-American rock band formed in Hereford, England, in March 1978. The original band comprised initiator and main songwriter Chrissie Hynde (lead vocals, rhythm guitar), James Honeyman-Scott (lead guitar, backing vocals, keyboards), Pete Farndon (bass guitar, backing vocals)..."

 

And so, while I will definitely take what you and that satellite DJ said about this into consideration, I'm sorry to say I still have some small reservations about this "New Wave" nomenclature used to define Chrissie and her band's primary genre.

What made you select "Missing Persons? And who is this Wikipedia guy anyway? The one song by the Pretenders that definitely has a New Wave feel,  (and I listen to more New Wave than any of you) is "Mystery Achievement". This was HEAVILY played at the Mudd Club and Danceteria, though others were also played. Incidentally, another NYC new wave dance club at that time was the re-opened Peppermint Lounge, at which the Twist had been so big years before. I recall hearing Duran Duran's "Planet Earth" here for the first time.

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Pretenders did emerge from the punk/new wave movement (that movement itself beginning in the UK).

 

New Wave became such a broad term that it has been called "virtually meaningless" by The New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock.

 

Wiki's first paragraph on 'New Wave Music' begins:

New wave music is an umbrella term for several late-1970s to mid-1980s pop/rock musical styles with ties to 1970s punk rock.The wide range of bands categorized under this term has been a source of much confusion and controversy. The new wave sound of the late 1970s moved away from the smooth blues and rock & roll sounds to create music with a twitchy, agitated feel, choppy rhythm guitars and fast tempos. Initially new wave was broadly analogous to punk rock before branching as a distinctly identified genre, incorporating electronic/experimental music, mod, disco and pop. It subsequently engendered subgenres and fusions, including New Romantic and goth rock.

 

The Wiki article goes on extensively and makes for an interesting read.

The first song that I would classify as New Wave was Roxy Music's "Love is the Drug" (1975)

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So, WHERE in all this would you place Thomas Dolby?

 

His "The Flat Earth" LP is STILL one of my favorites, and world's above most "new wave" offerings of the '80's.

 

In the entire history of recorded popular music you can find there were those who "created" a new direction, and those who exploited it into crass commerial plastic dreck.  But not ALL the "dreck" was bad.  Example---

 

There was Chick Webb.  THEN there was Benny Goodman.  Now, Webb's band was miles above Goodman's, but Goodman's band did achieve fame and popularity, and was also good.  This sort of thing also happened a lot in the ROCK'N'ROLL genre, blues and jazz as well.  "Punk" is to "New Wave" what "Acid Rock" was to "Bubblegum".  IMHO!

 

 

Sepiatone

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So, WHERE in all this would you place Thomas Dolby?

 

His "The Flat Earth" LP is STILL one of my favorites, and world's above most "new wave" offerings of the '80's.

 

In the entire history of recorded popular music you can find there were those who "created" a new direction, and those who exploited it into crass commerial plastic dreck.  But not ALL the "dreck" was bad.  Example---

 

There was Chick Webb.  THEN there was Benny Goodman.  Now, Webb's band was miles above Goodman's, but Goodman's band did achieve fame and popularity, and was also good.  This sort of thing also happened a lot in the ROCK'N'ROLL genre, blues and jazz as well.  "Punk" is to "New Wave" what "Acid Rock" was to "Bubblegum".  IMHO!

 

 

Sepiatone

That analogy seems pretty humble to me.

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So, WHERE in all this would you place Thomas Dolby?

 

His "The Flat Earth" LP is STILL one of my favorites, and world's above most "new wave" offerings of the '80's.

 

In the entire history of recorded popular music you can find there were those who "created" a new direction, and those who exploited it into crass commerial plastic dreck.  But not ALL the "dreck" was bad.  Example---

 

There was Chick Webb.  THEN there was Benny Goodman.  Now, Webb's band was miles above Goodman's, but Goodman's band did achieve fame and popularity, and was also good.  This sort of thing also happened a lot in the ROCK'N'ROLL genre, blues and jazz as well.  "Punk" is to "New Wave" what "Acid Rock" was to "Bubblegum".  IMHO!

 

 

Sepiatone

Here he with is his New Toy as sung by the ever intriguing Lene Lovich:  

 

 

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So, WHERE in all this would you place Thomas Dolby?

 

His "The Flat Earth" LP is STILL one of my favorites, and world's above most "new wave" offerings of the '80's.

 

In the entire history of recorded popular music you can find there were those who "created" a new direction, and those who exploited it into crass commerial plastic dreck.  But not ALL the "dreck" was bad.  Example---

 

There was Chick Webb.  THEN there was Benny Goodman.  Now, Webb's band was miles above Goodman's, but Goodman's band did achieve fame and popularity, and was also good.  This sort of thing also happened a lot in the ROCK'N'ROLL genre, blues and jazz as well.  "Punk" is to "New Wave" what "Acid Rock" was to "Bubblegum".  IMHO!

 

 

Sepiatone

Just from my familiarity with 'Blinded Me With Science", I would place Thomas Dolby in the trash can.

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Just from my familiarity with 'Blinded Me With Science", I would place Thomas Dolby in the trash can.

So, I take it you've NEVER HEARD "the Flat Earth". 

 

Oh, (snicker ) YOU were busy ( snork! )  listening to DURAN-DURAN! ( hee-hee-snort! :wacko:  :wacko:  :lol:

 

 

Sepiatone

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So, I take it you've NEVER HEARD "the Flat Earth". 

 

Oh, (snicker ) YOU were busy ( snork! )  listening to DURAN-DURAN! ( hee-hee-snort! :wacko:  :wacko:  :lol:

 

 

Sepiatone

FYI. John Taylor was considered one of the best bassists in rock.

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