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What was the first film you saw in the theater?


starkhome
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I'm a new poster on this forum, so I thought I should start a new post.

 

The first movie I remember seeing in the theater was the Return of the Pink Panther in 1975.  That is also the last time I ever saw that movie.  Maybe I should watch it again for kicks.  I saw it at The Cooper Theater - a chain of 3 theaters (in Denver, Minneapolis & Omaha) that were so cool they deserve their own thread.

 

The first movie theater experience to ever have a big impact on me (like ten million other kids) was Star Wars which I saw in Boulder, Colo. in August 1977.  When it was first released, my Mom wouldn't let me go see it because a religious nut down the street told her that Darth Vader represented Satan it it was, thus, a satanic movie.  When my Grandma came to visit from North Dakota that summer, she asked me if I liked Star Wars.  I told her I wasn't allowed to see it, so she took me.  I think that's the only movie I ever saw in the theater with any of my grandparents.

 

As a kid, my allowance was based solely upon the price to see one movie with a small popcorn and a small pop.  In the late 70's this meant $3.00 per week.  My favorite movie candies were junior mints.  I never saw them outside a movie theater until many years later. 

 

Based on some of the "kids these days" posts, I'm guessing that I might be part of the "younger crowd" here.  I am curious to hear the various eras in which people saw their first movies and their recollections of the experience.

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My first movie experience, as I recall, was at the age of about 4 or 5 and going to downtown Los Angeles with my parents and seeing Cecil B. DeMille's 1956 remake of his TEN COMMANDMENTS. If fact, one of my earliest recollections in life is of the scene in this film where Heston's Moses, before discovering his actual heritage and thus in charge of the building of the pyramid, has the process momentarily stopped in order to save the life of his birth mother(coincidence, coincidence...well, that's DeMille for ya) from being squished to death after being caught between two large stone blocks by her tunic as they're being moved into position.

 

(...btw starkhome, welcome to the boards!)  

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Perhaps the first movie that I saw was when my parents took me to the drive-in to see a revival of 1950's King Solomon's Mines. I remember watching the Watusi doing their graceful rhythmic dance on screen, spears in their hands while doing so, I believe.

 

Even more than that, though, I recall the white faced clown, who stood in the darkness of the drive-in, suddenly sticking his huge, hideously painted face into our open car window, scaring the bejesus (among other things) out of me. I screamed, hitting the roof of our car in the process, as the clown cracked his head while pulling his head away, swearing at me in the process.

 

I reeeally hate clowns!

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Even more than that, though, I recall the white faced clown, who stood in the darkness of the drive-in, suddenly sticking his huge, hideously painted face into our open car window, scaring the bejesus (among other things) out of me. I screamed, hitting the roof of our car in the process, as the clown cracked his head while pulling his head away, swearing at me in the process.

 

I reeeally hate clowns!

 

LOL

 

Yeah, I had forgotten about your "Coulrophobia", Tom!

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Perhaps the first movie that I saw was when my parents took me to the drive-in to see a revival of 1950's King Solomon's Mines. I remember watching the Watusi doing their graceful rhythmic dance on screen, spears in their hands while doing so, I believe.

 

Even more than that, though, I recall the white faced clown, who stood in the darkness of the drive-in, suddenly sticking his huge, hideously painted face into our open car window, scaring the bejesus (among other things) out of me. I screamed, hitting the roof of our car in the process, as the clown cracked his head while pulling his head away, swearing at me in the process.

 

I reeeally hate clowns!

I wonder whether Kal Mann (who lived in my condo) saw this film before penning "The Wah-Watusi" for the Orlons in 1962.

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I wonder whether Kal Mann (who lived in my condo) saw this film before penning "The Wah-Watusi" for the Orlons in 1962.

 

Yeah, maybe. And maybe he also had watched a particular motorcycle movie starring Marlon Brando before he so-penned Bobby Rydell's hit "Wild One" TOO?!

 

(...yeah, you got it, DGF...I wiki-ed "Kal Mann" before I wrote this) ;)

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This always confuses me because my earliest recollection of movie going is when my Grandmother took me and my brother to the United Artist Theater in Downtown Detroit to see SLEEPING BEAUTY.  But the confusion comes because I KNEW I was much younger than the eight years old I must have been when the 1959 release date my research insists it came out, and the "electric buses", buses that had a pole attatched to an overhead wire like the old trolley cars used to have were still running downtown, and THEY discontinued in 1956!  So you can see my confusion.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Yeah, maybe. And maybe he also had watched a particular motorcycle movie starring Marlon Brando before he so-penned Bobby Rydell's hit "Wild One" TOO?!

 

(...yeah, you got it, DGF...I wiki-ed "Kal Mann" before I wrote this) ;)

A little plug---Kal Mann was the president and chief songwriter-producer for Cameo-Parkway records, Philly's first big label, in the late '50s and early '60s. Responsible for many hits.

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The first movie I saw in a theater was that 1965 "classic", Two on a Guillotine.  Cesar Romero was great in it.  It also starred Connie Stevens and Dean Jones.  I think it has aired on TCM before, but it's been a very long time since I've seen it.  It would make a great film for October leading up to Halloween.

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The first film I ever saw in a de facto theatre was "The Lion King" when it came out in 1994. I was three. My mom took my brother and I to see it, and we were hooked, instantly. It got so bad that we actual,y used to reenact seemed from the film in the backyard and around the house, driving our family nuts in the process.

 

Along with TLK, I actually remember the other five films I saw early in my childhood, at around the same age:

 

1.) Cinderella (the Disney version)

2.) The Meteor Man (a cult classic)

3.) The Ten Commandments (a popular choice on this thread, it seems; this is probably where the classic movie love started)

4.) March of the Wooden Soldiers (the one with Laurel and Hardy, still a Christmas favorite with me)

5.) Coming to America (the edited version, of course)

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You know, for decades I walked around with an image of Santa Claus up in a tree and a devil in a fireplace. Well, come to find out, these were scenes in the Mexican movie about Santa Claus. And last year for Christmas I bought the DVD of the movie telling my wife and son that this was the very first movie I ever saw in a theater. I figure I must have been about four and a half years old when my mother took my friend and me to the theater in downtown Napoleon, Ohio back in 1962 (or close to that year, I guess).

 

Also about that time I remember seeing Disney's Pinocchio and Son of Flubber (I actually got some Flubber at the five and dime, which I promptly lost because it was clear and you couldn't see where it bounced off to!)

 

All in all, a very enjoyable thread.

Brian

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When I had just turned seven and entered 2nd grade, I walked down to the Uptown Theater on Washington's Connecticut Avenue and paid 35 cents to see The Mob, with Broderick Crawford.  I don't remember much about it at all, nor about the second movie I saw a few weeks later, which was Bambi.  But I'm pretty sure that the second movie was much more violent.

 

The movie I really wanted to see was The Day The Earth Stood Still, which had come out earlier that year, but I made the stupid mistake of telling my parents that I was going to see it, and got sentenced to the neighborhood playground until that movie had finished its run.  Parents just don't get it, do they?

 

What I remember even more was the movie I took my first date to:  Rosalind Russell's Auntie Mame, at the old Ambassador Theater at 18th St. and Columbia Road..  I sold my 1400 strong comic book collection for $14.00 to finance the occasion, and had plenty of money left over.

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I saw the 1987 re-release of Disney's The Aristocats when I was three.  I don't remember much.  I remember more about seeing 1989's The Little Mermaid when I was 5.  I pretty much saw all the Disney movies when they came out. 

 

The last movie I saw at a Drive-In was Wayne's World in 1992 when I was 8.

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It is not possible for me to know because I watched movies in variety of venues from time when I was an infant.

 

I know that I saw when very young: Bed and Sofa (1927) because it was a family story that I wanted a rug at the market because it was like the one "the pretty lady has." I was so very young that I could not articulate that I had seen it in that movie.

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When I had just turned seven and entered 2nd grade, I walked down to the Uptown Theater on Washington's Connecticut Avenue and paid 35 cents to see The Mob, with Broderick Crawford.  I don't remember much about it at all, nor about the second movie I saw a few weeks later, which was Bambi.  But I'm pretty sure that the second movie was much more violent.

 

The movie I really wanted to see was The Day The Earth Stood Still, which had come out earlier that year, but I made the stupid mistake of telling my parents that I was going to see it, and got sentenced to the neighborhood playground until that movie had finished its run.  Parents just don't get it, do they?

 

What I remember even more was the movie I took my first date to:  Rosalind Russell's Auntie Mame, at the old Ambassador Theater at 18th St. and Columbia Road..  I sold my 1400 strong comic book collection for $14.00 to finance the occasion, and had plenty of money left over.

 

Kind'a surprised to read the story of your parents balking at the idea of your going to see the story of Klaatu's arrival onto Earth, Andy. I guess maybe they didn't know it wasn't that violent or scary of a movie, and in fact as I'm sure you know, is pretty much a thinly veiled allegory of the Christ story.

 

(...btw...got a good chuckle out of your "Bambi being more violent than The Mob" line) 

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It is not possible for me to know because I watched movies in variety of venues from time when I was an infant.

 

I know that I saw when very young: Bed and Sofa (1927) because it was a family story that I wanted a rug at the market because it was like the one "the pretty lady has." I was so very young that I could not articulate that I had seen it in that movie.

Hey! I've seen that movie. When I had Netflix years ago I got on a kick of renting foreign Silents and this is one they had. I liked it.

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Kind'a surprised to read the story of your parents balking at the idea of your going to see the story of Klaatu's arrival onto Earth, Andy. I guess maybe they didn't know it wasn't that violent or scary of a movie, and in fact as I'm sure you know, is pretty much a thinly veiled allegory of the Christ story.

 

Well, they really didn't know much about The Day The Earth Stood Still except what they'd heard about it from the publicity, and one of the things they'd heard about it was that it was filmed in our home town of Washington.  That alone might have been enough to bring out the nanny mentality in them.

 

Ironically, I finally saw the movie many years later, and about the only thing interesting about it was seeing some of the old fashioned street signs that I remember from 60 years ago.  The movie itself was a snoozer compared to classics like The War of the Worlds and THEM!

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The thing I remember most is the first movie I didn't see. My parents thought I was too young to accompany them and my older brother to see "So Dear to My Heart" (1949) and I was one indignant three year old. My brother told me the whole thing in detail afterward, but I never got to see it until the VHS release. The first one I saw in a theater was (I think) "Cinderella" (1950), though I know we saw all of the Disney live action nature series too, so it could have been one of those first. A few years later I accompanied my older and younger brothers to Saturday matinees at the local theater to see all those dumb action and sci-fi programmers and tons of cartoons.

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The first film I saw in a theater was Aladdin when I was six.  Although it almost wasn't - I went with my dad, and there was this big poster of the genie next to one of the theaters, so we went in, and then Bill Murray appeared on the screen. It was the theater for Groundhog Day. By the time we got to the correct theater, Aladdin had already started. I didn't see the first 15 minutes of the movie until it came out on video.

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The first film I saw in a theater was Aladdin when I was six.  Although it almost wasn't - I went with my dad, and there was this big poster of the genie next to one of the theaters, so we went in, and then Bill Murray appeared on the screen. It was the theater for Groundhog Day. By the time we got to the correct theater, Aladdin had already started. I didn't see the first 15 minutes of the movie until it came out on video.

The first movie I saw in the theatre was THE RED BALL EXPRESS (1953) with my grandfather. The first movie I recall really liking that I saw in the theatre was THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI (1957), which I saw with my father.

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By the time we got to the correct theater, Aladdin had already started. I didn't see the first 15 minutes of the movie until it came out on video.

And when it came out on video, it had an altered opening because there had been accusations of racial stereotyping and Disney took heed.

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