Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

A modest suggestion


SansFin
 Share

Recommended Posts

I must wonder if it would be popular for TCM to leave a block of each week's programming virtually blank when preparing schedules months in advance.

 

This time could then be filled with last-minute selections of movies which mirror current events. By this I mean that if the hot news of the week is a scandal in Washington, D. C. then the movies aired could be of such scandals in 1930s and 1940s. 

 

I believe this would allow perspective in that there is no thing which has not happened in similar manner many times in the past. 

 

I believe it would allow also to show that classic movies can add depth to discussions of current events and so show how classic movies retain relevance in today's world.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmmm..."Washington D.C. scandals" ya say, eh Sans?!

 

Not wastin' any time enjoying being a full-fledged and involved American Citizen are we, Sans???!!! LOL ;)

 

And, although I believe your suggestion here has merit, I also have to wonder about the "longevity"(if ya know what I mean) of some threads once a discussion would brew within them and once it percolates toward comparisons between present day politicos and those depicted in '30s and '40s cinema?

 

(...sorry about that lame "coffee" metaphor here, AND I hope I haven't been THAT much a "wet blanket" here)  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm relieved, Sansfin, to find that your modest proposal is not to deal with the serious problem of global overpopulation by consuming babies.

I had to make a swift response to your thread.

 

Actually, it's a potentially good idea. (the leaving a block of unscheduled time on TCM, not the consumption of newborns to control world population growth.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And, although I believe your suggestion here has merit, I also have to wonder about the "longevity"(if ya know what I mean) of some threads once a discussion would brew within them and once it percolates toward comparisons between present day politicos and those depicted in '30s and '40s cinema?

 

 

I believe that that would be part of entertainment.

 

It is well known that many people go to automobile races in hopes to see accidents. Fireworks are beloved by many. Threads sprouting from airing of such movies would surely be spectacular crashes with fireballs spewing in all directions. :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm relieved, Sansfin, to find that your modest proposal is not to deal with the serious problem of global overpopulation by consuming babies.

I had to make a swift response to your thread.

 

Actually, it's a potentially good idea. (the leaving a block of unscheduled time on TCM, not the consumption of newborns to control world population growth.)

 

Feed the homeless to the hungry? ;)

 

My mind has been churning over what effects we might see if/when there is dedicated push to enhance "branding" of TCM by new General Manager.

 

I envision little advantage to advertising of movies on TCM in significant number of venues if there is not "gimmick" to make them relevant to mainstream viewer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't do it often, but TCM already pre-empts its on programming on occasion-with no explanation.  NOT talking about in memorium specials when someone dies.

One problem is that Now Playing is printed 6-8 weeks in advance, at least.  For instance, I have had the December Now Playing for a couple of weeks now.  Always get them almost a month in advance.  So are they sending it to printers two months before it begins?

BTW, receiving NP a month out is frustrating when TCM changes movies listed for some unknown reason.  Thank goodness, I have the information feature on my cable so I can verify that TCM is actually showing the movie I wanted to record at 2 AM-usually.

When would TCM finalize the schedule?  How would people know what was being shown and when?  How would newspapers know what to list?

 I never look at the TCM.com scheduling site.

Why do they prepare listings months in advance anyway?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SansFin, your thread title reminded of the title of the infamous essay by Jonathan Swift, circa 1729. If you aren't familiar with it (and there's no reason why you should be) you would indeed be wondering what on earth I was talking about.

I'm sorry if I came across as a smart- azz here, I just couldn't resist.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SansFin, your thread title reminded of the title of the infamous essay by Jonathan Swift, circa 1729. If you aren't familiar with it (and there's no reason why you should be) you would indeed be wondering what on earth I was talking about.

I'm sorry if I came across as a smart- azz here, I just couldn't resist.

 

Now THAT'S actually a great a comparison of sorts here MissW, considering as how many of Swift's tales and not just this particular essay you mentioned were indeed stories he told which were thinly veiled satiric "essays" of his time's politics, and which is pretty much how I'm understanding Sans' "modest proposal" here.

 

(...and no, I didn't find you being a "smart- azz" here at all, MissW...and I would know, of course!) ;)

 

LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SansFin, your thread title reminded of the title of the infamous essay by Jonathan Swift, circa 1729. If you aren't familiar with it (and there's no reason why you should be) you would indeed be wondering what on earth I was talking about.

I'm sorry if I came across as a smart- azz here, I just couldn't resist.

 

I know well of Jonathan Swift's: A Modest Proposal as well as many of his other works. I love satire in nearly all forms and so semester of satire-as-political-discourse was one of my favorite courses. I knew you were not attempting to be smart-asz when you saw connection between title of essay and subject of post. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't do it often, but TCM already pre-empts its on programming on occasion-with no explanation.  NOT talking about in memorium specials when someone dies.

 

Why do they prepare listings months in advance anyway?

 

I have read that several issues commonly arise during time between when movies are scheduled and when they are due to appear. Among these are inability to obtain rights, lack of print of suitable quality, lack of print in acceptable format and failure to receive print in due time.

 

I believe that there are several reasons for preparing schedules long in advance:

 

There are published listings of whole-month schedules for nearly all channels. These listings are primarily for viewers who have independent satellite dishes. Those who publish these listings need schedules far in advance to allow time for printing and distribution.

 

Those who input listings shown on cable systems prefer to work a month or six weeks in advance because this is a buffer for those times when they must spend several days or even a week changing previously-input schedules due to changes caused by news or sporting events.

 

TCM must prepare projected schedules far in advance so that they will have time to acquire rights and prints. I believe that TCM is a rarity in their allowing viewers to see these projected schedules. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TCM must prepare projected schedules far in advance so that they will have time to acquire rights and prints. 

Don't they obtain thr rights and schedule the prints arrivals before they do the schedule?  How could they schedule a movie without having the rights to show it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't they obtain thr rights and schedule the prints arrivals before they do the schedule?  How could they schedule a movie without having the rights to show it?

 

It is by doing schedule first that they know which movies they wish to use and whether the movies will fit into time allowed. I believe that it would make little sense for them to acquire rights to movies before they know how and when they can schedule them. It would be as if buying clothing for niece who lives far away prior to having knowledge of her size and what colors and styles she can wear.

 

I have asked and been told that all channels must have schedules finalized a minimum of six weeks prior to airing. I believe that TCM must have much longer time than that between "wish list schedule" and "final schedule" because of time required to acquire rights and prints. Most channels do not have as many rights to secure and they have fewer primary sources from which to acquire rights because they buy packages of programming. The movies which TCM airs are mostly licensed on piecemeal basis.

 

I believe that TCM is rarity in allowing viewers to see schedules so very far in advance that the schedules are yet in "we hope to show this" stage. Having schedules so very far in advance increases viewers' anticipation but also increases risks of disappointment.

 
I would urge you to participate in the next TCM Programming Challenge because I believe it will provide you with insights into situations encountered while preparing schedules. The next TCM-P-C is scheduled to begin on January 11, 2015. Others and I are happy to provide information and assist those making schedules for first time. The Challenges are an excellent method of making suggestions for movies and themes to TCM as TCM programmers frequently steal borrow ideas from entry schedules to use in real schedules. The Challenges allow also an opportunity to showcase your taste in movies and to demonstrate your brilliance.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, I'll betcha THIS will probably be Topic One at the next shareholders' "meating", aright! 

 

I found a file on our computer which contains: Children's Menu. I am sorry to say that the only entree which I remember is: "Kindergartner Kabobs." I do not know source but I suspect it was whim of my husband who often writes things in order to purge them from his mind. It is unfortunate that files on computer have been rearranged several times and so I do no know how to find that one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found a file on our computer which contains: Children's Menu. I am sorry to say that the only entree which I remember is: "Kindergartner Kabobs." I do not know source but I suspect it was whim of my husband who often writes things in order to purge them from his mind. It is unfortunate that files on computer have been rearranged several times and so I do no know how to find that one.

 

Might I suggest another possible selection from that "children's menu" could have been...wait for it...

 

"Rug Rat Roast" ???

 

(...isn't alliteration a wonderful thing sometimes?!) ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

It is by doing schedule first that they know which movies they wish to use and whether the movies will fit into time allowed.

It would be as if buying clothing for niece who lives far away prior to having knowledge of her size and what colors and styles she can wear.

 

 

 
 

 

Has TCM said this or is this supposition on your part? 

As for the niece, the example would be to tell your niece you are sending her a blouse of a certain color, size, style, designer, etc. and THEN calling the sole store selling them to see if they have one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has TCM said this or is this supposition on your part? 

 

It has been specifically stated that substitutions in a schedule were due to their not being able to acquire rights to air the movies which they had scheduled. It is obvious by this that the schedules come first.

 

Would you have them acquire rights to movies at random and then try to find appropriate places to use them? It is logical to determine what they need and then buy only what fills that need.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It has been specifically stated that substitutions in a schedule were due to their not being able to acquire rights to air the movies which they had scheduled. It is obvious by this that the schedules come first.

 

Would you have them acquire rights to movies at random and then try to find appropriate places to use them? It is logical to determine what they need and then buy only what fills that need.

 

I assume they acquire most movies from studios based on a package (bundle) and based their schedule on that.  This is what TCM has said occurs.  Ok, every so often a movie in this bundle runs into 'rights' issues (but mostly for TCM Canada),  and TCM has to replace that movie.

 

I find it had to believe that TCM lays out a schedule and then seeks those movies from various studios based on said schedule.   This would lead to constance change of the plannd schedule when they ran into films they couldn't lease due to 'rights' issues or cost.

 

So the schedules does NOT come first just because of 'rights' issues that happen from time to time. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume they acquire most movies from studios based on a package (bundle) and based their schedule on that.  This is what TCM has said occurs.  Ok, every so often a movie in this bundle runs into 'rights' issues (but mostly for TCM Canada),  and TCM has to replace that movie.

 

I find it had to believe that TCM lays out a schedule and then seeks those movies from various studios based on said schedule.   This would lead to constance change of the plannd schedule when they ran into films they couldn't lease due to 'rights' issues or cost.

 

So the schedules does NOT come first just because of 'rights' issues that happen from time to time. 

 

The only 'bundle' of movies of which I am aware which TCM acquired for air was for the mutli-month theme concerning the history of cinema. This was necessary because of the exceptionally large number of foreign movies. 

 

The vast majority of movies shown in each month do not require negotiations to acquire rights to air in that month. I believe that movies from the original Turner library are readily available by sending a memo to the division of Turner Entertainment which now owns that library. Most movies from other libraries are available because the normal method of licensing is to acquire rights for multiple showings within a certain timeframe. It is likely also that renewal of a recently-expired license is most-often easy.

 

I believe that acquisition of rights becomes an issue primarily when a movie is TCM Premiere. Those movies are a very small percentage of the total which air in each month.

 

Vice President ico Programming Charlie Tabesh stated:

“So we try to structure deals with all the studios where, in addition to the traditional way of licensing a film, say, for twelve months or two years, and getting a certain number of runs within that period of time, we say, ‘Let us also dip into your library for one run of a film maybe forty times per year.’ So we’ll go to Universal or Fox and we’ll say, ‘We’re not going to want to play this movie 12 times over the next two years. We’re just going to want to play it once when Bette Davis is our Star of the Month.’ And, by structuring our deals that way, that’s allowed us a lot more diversity and it’s allowed us to bring in films that we couldn't.”

http://willmckinley.wordpress.com/2013/05/11/10-things-i-learned-at-the-tcm-classic-film-festival/

 

His statement: "... the traditional way of licensing a film ..." indicates that rights to movies are acquired on an individual basis. I believe that if TCM purchased rights to bundles of movies then he would have stated that they make deals for special movies in addition to bundles.

 

 

I would ask what sense it would be to acquire rights to air movies prior to there being a clear plan of how to use those movies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...