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Sepiatone

Whaddya say?

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Ever notice there are certain words people mispronounce?  I mean, just about EVERYbody.....and often the same words.

 

two of the most mispronounced are:

 

Asphalt:   Many people will say ASH-fault, which IS incorrect.

 

Sherbet:  Long a pet peeve of mine, but I've noticed even FOODIES, like MICHAEL SYMON on "The Chew" and others on The Food Network would often say, "SHER-bert".  Which too, is wrong. 

 

Then there's:

 

Horseradish:  How many of us, and I'll also plead guitly, more often than not say HORSH-RADISH?

 

My ex used to say stuff like, oh----MEER, instead of Mirror, which SHOULD be pronounced, "MEER-Oar!"

 

She'd also pronounce it, "Toe-let paper"  and I've also heard, "TALL-LET paper" from some.

 

Once, when discussing this sort of thing with others, a friend of mine who worked in a hardware store mentioned there were lots of folks who'd come in looking to buy an---"Stenshun chord" instead of an EXTENTION CHORD.  Also, "Light Ballbs" and not "Bulbs".

 

I know there are probably( or, rather---"prolly", or "prob'ly") others I'm overlooking, or haven't heard for some reason.  Have any of YOU?

 

 

Sepiatone

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I certainly wouldn’t say that everyone mispronounces this word, but I am always intrigued by how frequently it is mispronounced as NEWK-ya-ler, rather than NEWK-lee-er, by people who have degrees from reputable schools (Yale, for example), or who have advanced degrees from any school, or who are in the upper-echelons of business or politics.

 

It’s pro’ly the word I hear mispronounced the most.

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Sherbet:  Long a pet peeve of mine, but I've noticed even FOODIES, like MICHAEL SYMON on "The Chew" and others on The Food Network would often say, "SHER-bert".  Which too, is wrong. 

 

What is the correct pronunciation?

 

I hear axe instead of ask quite often.  I have a co-worker who writes "eye swore" instead or eyesore.  Cracks me up, but then I have to correct those errors, and there are many!

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I certainly wouldn’t say that everyone mispronounces this word, but I am always intrigued by how frequently it is mispronounced as NEWK-ya-ler, rather than NEWK-lee-er, by people who have degrees from reputable schools (Yale, for example), or who have advanced degrees from any school, or who are in the upper-echelons of business or politics.

 

It’s pro’ly the word I hear mispronounced the most.

A former president who melted down the country in 2008 mispronounced it that very way. <_<

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A former president who melted down the country in 2008 mispronounced it that very way. <_<

 

Yes. That particular politician was foremost in my mind when I mentioned Yale and the upper-echelons of politics.He is also a product of Harvard Business School.

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Sherbet:  Long a pet peeve of mine, but I've noticed even FOODIES, like MICHAEL SYMON on "The Chew" and others on The Food Network would often say, "SHER-bert".  Which too, is wrong. 

 

What is the correct pronunciation?

 

I hear axe instead of ask quite often.  I have a co-worker who writes "eye swore" instead or eyesore.  Cracks me up, but then I have to correct those errors, and there are many!

It would be SHER-bet!  

 

And it seems to me that "Axe" instead of ASK is mostly an African American aberration.  I've never heard caucasians pronounce it. 

 

But, not common, but odd---my sister in law pronounces it "SAL-mun", instead of "SAM-on" (Salmon) AND she also says SALT by pronouncing the SAL part as one would the first half of the name SALLY, Like in "My Gal Sal"  instead of "Sawlt".

 

Sepiatone

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It would be SHER-bet!  

 

And it seems to me that "Axe" instead of ASK is mostly an African American aberration.  I've never heard caucasians pronounce it. 

 

But, not common, but odd---my sister in law pronounces it "SAL-mun", instead of "SAM-on" (Salmon) AND she also says SALT by pronouncing the SAL part as one would the first half of the name SALLY, Like in "My Gal Sal"  instead of "Sawlt".

 

Sepiatone

Why are there 2 threads with this title?

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Why are there 2 threads with this title?

When I stared it, I mistakenly thought I was in the "off-topic" room, but noticed after I posted that I was in the "General discussions" room.  So I copy and pasted it into the correct room, but didn't know how to completely delete it from the other room, so there it is!

 

Sepiatone

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So, how BOTH of them wound up in here, I do not know!

 

 

The post in: General Discussions had indicator that Moderator moved it. 

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If you notice- Mammy says "axe" in GWTW, so it's not new street talk. It was pointed out that English would be a second language for many African born slaves and possibly they could not pronounce "ask" in the same way the Irish can't pronounce "th". Notice Maureen O'Hara says "tanks" for "thanks" in MIRACLE ON 34th ST.

 

Nowadays, I think there's no excuse for "axe", it's been several generations over 100 years to assimilate. Although whenever a customer buys one in my store, I make a point to say, "Do you want to AXE anything?" which always gets a big gaffaw from the customer.

 

My pet peeve are those who drop the "H" from the beginning of only some words. They will say "the uman race" but say "history" & "house" properly. What's up with that?

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One thing that DOESN'T seem to be less than a phenomenom is the fact that you can ask a simple question, and there will be plenty of people ready to jump in and be completely off point.

 

For example, on one FACEBOOK page that dealt with the history of my hometown, I asked a simple question:   "What was at the corner of Dix-Toledo Highway and Champaign street BEFORE the Spartan discount store that was there for more than 20 years?"

 

And plenty of people felt free to chime in with the names of just about every business that occupied that corner AFTER the Spartan store closed up and moved out!  AND THEY got upset with ME because I expressed my frustration with THEIR lack of being able to follow a simple train of thought.

 

So-----I DON'T CARE that Mammy said "AXE" in Gone With The Wind"

 

I DON'T CARE how they say "mirror" in NEW ENGLAND

 

I'm just looking for EVERYDAY, COMMON WORDS that MOST EVERYBODY mispronounces, like in my examples of "ASPHALT", "HORSERADISH" and "SHERBET"

 

WHAT is SO hard to comprehend?

 

 

Sepiatone

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My pet peeve are those who drop the "H" from the beginning of only some words. They will say "the uman race" but say "history" & "house" properly. What's up with that?

 

I remember an exchange in: My Fair Lady (1964) in which 'enry 'iggins tells that people who drop the letter: 'H' from beginnings of words will also at times add it to beginnings where it does not belong. I believe: 'hever' instead of: 'ever' is the example. I do not remember that exchange in the original play but I am sure that such was common in the period in which the play is set.

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I'm just looking for EVERYDAY, COMMON WORDS that MOST EVERYBODY mispronounces, like in my examples of "ASPHALT", "HORSERADISH" and "SHERBET"

 

 

I believe that the rule is that if a few people pronounce a word in non-standard way then it is: mispronunciation.

 

I believe that the rule is also that if a very large number of people pronounce a word in non-standard way then it is: alternate pronunciation.

 

When many people use same alternate pronunciation for variety of words then it becomes a dialect. Dialects are frequently regional but they can be based also on ethnicity, education, employment or other such divisions within a wider population.

 

I am sure that research into vernacular usage of most of the words which you bring into question would reveal variety of common pronunciations far beyond the few which space allows in dictionaries. 

 

I believe that it may be that the lack of responses which you find appropriate re: your original post is that many people do not share your floccinaucinihilipilification of the rich tapestry of human speech.

 

Q: Why can you not hear a pterodactyl go to the bathroom?

A: Their 'p' is silent.

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I believe that the rule is that if a few people pronounce a word in non-standard way then it is: mispronunciation.

 

I believe that the rule is also that if a very large number of people pronounce a word in non-standard way then it is: alternate pronunciation.

 

When many people use same alternate pronunciation for variety of words then it becomes a dialect. Dialects are frequently regional but they can be based also on ethnicity, education, employment or other such divisions within a wider population.

 

I am sure that research into vernacular usage of most of the words which you bring into question would reveal variety of common pronunciations far beyond the few which space allows in dictionaries. 

 

I believe that it may be that the lack of responses which you find appropriate re: your original post is that many people do not share your floccinaucinihilipilification of the rich tapestry of human speech.

 

Q: Why can you not hear a pterodactyl go to the bathroom?

A: Their 'p' is silent.

THIS sort of stuff just proves my point!

 

No matter HOW many people pronounce it HORSH-RADISH, it's INCORRECT!  There CAN be NO alternative to it's pronounciation.!

 

There is only ONE "R" in SHERBET!

 

There is NO "R" in WASH!

 

Cute gag about the pterodactyl.  I would imagine you can't hear them go to the bathroom because:

 

1.  They're long EXTINCT!

2. They wouldn't have used a bathroom to begin with!

 

Oh, it's OK to an extent to mispronounce many words that have foreign roots that are finding everyday use in English speaking countries.  Like, it drves my Mexican wife's sisters CRAZY to hear us "Whettoes" say stuff like "Tore-TILL-ahs", or "CALLY-ENTAY".   Just as it galls me to hear ignoramuses say "PER-OH-Gies"  and "GWUMP- keys"

 

 

Sepiatone

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I believe that the rule is that if a few people pronounce a word in non-standard way then it is: mispronunciation.

 

I believe that the rule is also that if a very large number of people pronounce a word in non-standard way then it is: alternate pronunciation.

 

When many people use same alternate pronunciation for variety of words then it becomes a dialect. Dialects are frequently regional but they can be based also on ethnicity, education, employment or other such divisions within a wider population.

 

I am sure that research into vernacular usage of most of the words which you bring into question would reveal variety of common pronunciations far beyond the few which space allows in dictionaries. 

 

I believe that it may be that the lack of responses which you find appropriate re: your original post is that many people do not share your floccinaucinihilipilification of the rich tapestry of human speech.

 

Q: Why can you not hear a pterodactyl go to the bathroom?

A: Their 'p' is silent.

Don't pterodactyls ever take a s***?

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One thing that DOESN'T seem to be less than a phenomenom is the fact that you can ask a simple question, and there will be plenty of people ready to jump in and be completely off point.

 

For example, on one FACEBOOK page that dealt with the history of my hometown, I asked a simple question:   "What was at the corner of Dix-Toledo Highway and Champaign street BEFORE the Spartan discount store that was there for more than 20 years?"

 

And plenty of people felt free to chime in with the names of just about every business that occupied that corner AFTER the Spartan store closed up and moved out!  AND THEY got upset with ME because I expressed my frustration with THEIR lack of being able to follow a simple train of thought.

 

So-----I DON'T CARE that Mammy said "AXE" in Gone With The Wind"

 

I DON'T CARE how they say "mirror" in NEW ENGLAND

 

I'm just looking for EVERYDAY, COMMON WORDS that MOST EVERYBODY mispronounces, like in my examples of "ASPHALT", "HORSERADISH" and "SHERBET"

 

WHAT is SO hard to comprehend?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

So Sepia, allow me to explain why as an airline supervisor(before my retirement...and thus now days allowing me ALL this "free time" to sit at this here keyboard and while away the hours...ah, but I digress) my agents would often say the following to each other:

 

"Don't ask Dwight how to correctly perform a work function, because if you ask him what the time is, he's likely to tell you how to build a watch!"

 

And the REASON they'd say that is because I always wanted them to know HOW their job function interfaced with all the OTHER various job functions performed by everyone else in our operation, and so they'd know WHY I wanted them to do their job in a complete manner and thus why "cutting corners" would often cause a malfunction in said operation, theory being: The more you know, the better you are at what you're doing, and the less likely you'll be at screwing up and screwing up everybody ELSE along the way.

 

And so, THIS is why I may often seem to do the very thing you said you hate when people do it!

 

In other words: It's a bad habit and I CAN'T STOP DOIN' IT!!!

 

(...now what were you sayin' again???) LOL

 

;)

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In that case it might be OK.  But it's possible to explain someone's job function WITHOUT going into how it relates to EVERY OTHER JOB IN THE PLACE.  Now, SOME jobs might require it.  As a supervisor, it would be prudent of you to be able to recognize the WHEN of such a thing.

 

But I fail to see it's relationship in the case of a simple online FORUM thread.

 

But, as I put in near thirty years as an HOURLY WAGE employee,before my medical retirement, questioning and criticizing the actions of supervision is the habit I find hard to drop! :P

 

 

Sepiatone

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My pet peeve are those who drop the "H" from the beginning of only some words. They will say "the uman race" but say "history" & "house" properly. What's up with that?

 

Yes Tiki, but answer(btw, what happened to the "w" in THIS word, HUH?!) me this:

 

Do YOU call those ingredients often used in the culinary arts "Herbs", and like those "Superfluous-U Users" call the stuff in Jolly Ole England, OR do you call that stuff "Erbs", and just as ALL us good ol' Americans call it???

 

(...and so, IF it might be the latter instance of these two, then I certainly hope you don't get "peeved" at yourself every time YOU hear yourself say it that way!) ;)

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OK. Here’s another one: WENS-day rather than WEDns-day or WED-ns-day.

 

(I take back my previous comment about the word “nuclear” being the most mispronounced word I hear.)

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Yes Tiki, but answee me this:

 

Well, I call them by their full name: Herbert.  ;)

 

Sepia's frustration of people not answering a simple question simply, reminds me of another pet peeve of mine lately: very few people say "yes" or "no" to a basic question.

 

For example; I'll ask a customer if they'd like their merchandise in a bag. The answer is rarely "yes" or "no" but sometimes a "yeah", "yup", "nope", "nahh" like a bunch of toddlers.

 

But even worse is what I call the "non answer" (Sepia's gripe) 

Instead of a simple yes or no, they say, "I'm good" or "no worries" or worse "no problem".

 

My snotty response? "Well, I agree you're good, but do you want a bag?" usually results a big smile.

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OK. Here’s another one: WENS-day rather than WEDns-day or WED-ns-day.

 

(I take back my previous comment about the word “nuclear” being the most mispronounced word I hear.)

I'd like to hear you pronounce Wednesday, pronouncing the "d" without using an additional syllable.

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Yes Tiki, but answee me this:

 

Well, I call them by their full name: Herbert.  ;)

 

Sepia's frustration of people not answering a simple question simply, reminds me of another pet peeve of mine lately: very few people say "yes" or "no" to a basic question.

 

For example; I'll ask a customer if they'd like their merchandise in a bag. The answer is rarely "yes" or "no" but sometimes a "yeah", "yup", "nope", "nahh" like a bunch of toddlers.

 

But even worse is what I call the "non answer" (Sepia's gripe) 

Instead of a simple yes or no, they say, "I'm good" or "no worries" or worse "no problem".

 

My snotty response? "Well, I agree you're good, but do you want a bag?" usually results a big smile.

First off, DGF, I think that person was trying to be facetious.  Not even my WEBSTER'S has the "d" being pronounced in WEDNESDAY!

 

TIKI, I often TRY to have fun with the check-out girl, depending on what she asks and HOW----

 

For example, if she asks me if I want a particular item in a bag, I WILL respond with either a "yes" or "no".

 

But sometimes they WON'T ask me IF i have "any coupons, coinstar or bottle slips", but rather, just ask,---"Any coupons, coinstar or bottle slips?"  To which I'll respond, "No thank you".

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'd like to hear you pronounce Wednesday, pronouncing the "d" without using an additional syllable.

 

Good point, DGF. The “d” before the “n” cannot one syllable make. I knew something felt wrong with that, but I went right ahead and clicked “Add Reply” anyway. Faux pas for me.

 

In my defense, though, it was hard to see what I was typing with my head up my rear.

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