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Sepiatone

Whaddya say?

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Good point, DGF. The “d” before the “n” cannot one syllable make. I knew something felt wrong with that, but I went right ahead and clicked “Add Reply” anyway. Faux pas for me.

 

In my defense, though, it was hard to see what I was typing with my head up my rear.

Speaking of overused expressions, I'm glad you didn't say "My bad".

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Speaking of overused expressions, I'm glad you didn't say "My bad".

 

Yeah, that whole "my bad" thing doesn't hold any "gravitas" anymore, huh! ;)

 

(...yep, kind'a like: "Black Friday has become SO commercialized lately!") 

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One of the more mis-pronounced words I hear is "exscape" instead of "escape".

 

OH YEAH. Even MrTiki says that, and he's a correction officer! (and yes, I correct him every time he says it) Guess that's what happens when everyone around you mispronounces a word.

 

I HATE "my bad".....I always ask "your bad what?" It's like you'll see "Eat Fresh!" written everywhere. You can't eat an adjective, where's the noun? Eat fresh WHAT?

crazy.gif

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I HATE "my bad".....I always ask "your bad what?" It's like you'll see "Eat Fresh!" written everywhere. You can't eat an adjective, where's the noun? Eat fresh WHAT?

 

 

I have been irreliably informed that the phrase: "Eat Fresh" was initially a racially-insensitive joke about Oriental Zombies.

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Of course, certain people can be excluded from prosecution  in this case.

 

Little kids and people NEW to English.

 

Kids more often than not come up with variations like, "Pasketti" or "Asketti"  for "Spagetti".  Or, I have a nephew who, when VERY young, called it "PaDETTI"!  Then there's "Sangitch", "Sammich"  or Slammich" for "Sandwich".  Or, like I stated earlier, my younger daughter calling them "Rice SCRIPPIES"  instead of "Rice Krispies".

 

Or, how about my Polish immigrant Grandfather always saying, "Summa-nah BEACH!"  instead of...well.....

 

 

Sepiatone

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Of course, certain people can be excluded from prosecution  in this case.

 

Little kids and people NEW to English.

 

Kids more often than not come up with variations like, "Pasketti" or "Asketti"  for "Spagetti".  Or, I have a nephew who, when VERY young, called it "PaDETTI"!  Then there's "Sangitch", "Sammich"  or Slammich" for "Sandwich".  Or, like I stated earlier, my younger daughter calling them "Rice SCRIPPIES"  instead of "Rice Krispies".

 

Or, how about my Polish immigrant Grandfather always saying, "Summa-nah BEACH!"  instead of...well.....

 

 

Sepiatone

 

You forgot to mention "Samwitch" here, Sepia!

 

I'm pretty sure I always heard Annette here say just that in this Skippy Peanut Butter commercial from 1981...at the 0:06 mark...

 

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...

 

I HATE "my bad".....I always ask "your bad what?" It's like you'll see "Eat Fresh!" written everywhere. You can't eat an adjective, where's the noun? Eat fresh WHAT?

crazy.gif

 

"Drive Slow" signs pose an adjectival problem as well.

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I was acquainted with a full-grown manager who was adamantly convinced that he was asposed to say asketti.

 

I knew a director who had an MBA from SMU. She wrote all of her e-mail using texting shorthand, including “OMG!” and “LOL.” Her stay with the company was abbreviated.

 

Since some have mentioned interactions between customers and customer service staff, I’ll add my note of discontent to the pet peeve category, from the customer’s perspective.

 

If, at the conclusion of the checkout process, a customer service representative says “Thank you” to me (which has become more and more rare these days), I am always happy to say “Thank you” in return. However, my happiness quickly turns sickly green if the person then takes a noticeable dump on the pleasantries by magnanimously saying, “No problem.”

 

I see no particular benefit in taking the person to task for his or her carefree editorial, but one day, if the mood is just right, I might mention that I couldn’t possibly see how getting paid to do one’s job would be, in any way, a “problem.” Yes, it’s “just a figure of speech,” and linguistically speaking, “meaning is in the person and not the words,” but if I were a business owner I would ensure that employees saying “not a problem” to customers did not become a problem.

 

Writing of customer service editorials – since I have overcome the inertia – another pet peeve of mine is when members of wait staff feel the need to interject small editorials while the customer is ordering.

 

“I’ll have a chunk of fried, dead field beast, with mashed-up, boiled tuber-and-greasy-flour, and a glass of high fructose corn syrup with food coloring,” the customer says.

 

“Excellent!” the waiter says, either to let the customer know that the order meets with his discriminating approval, or perhaps because he hasn’t been trained properly.

 

The pièce de résistance of such editorial tidbits is, of course, when the waiter responds to the customer’s order by saying, “Awesome!”

 

As overly sated with pointless stimuli as “generation [insert label du jour here]” is, and as generally blasé as our whole society has become, it’s odd that a simple order of food can inspire awe in someone.

 

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I was acquainted with a full-grown manager who was adamantly convinced that he was asposed to say asketti.

 

I knew a director who had an MBA from SMU. She wrote all of her e-mail using texting shorthand, including “OMG!” and “LOL.” Her stay with the company was abbreviated.

 

Since some have mentioned interactions between customers and customer service staff, I’ll add my note of discontent to the pet peeve category, from the customer’s perspective.

 

If, at the conclusion of the checkout process, a customer service representative says “Thank you” to me (which has become more and more rare these days), I am always happy to say “Thank you” in return. However, my happiness quickly turns sickly green if the person then takes a noticeable dump on the pleasantries by magnanimously saying, “No problem.”

 

I see no particular benefit in taking the person to task for his or her carefree editorial, but one day, if the mood is just right, I might mention that I couldn’t possibly see how getting paid to do one’s job would be, in any way, a “problem.” Yes, it’s “just a figure of speech,” and linguistically speaking, “meaning is in the person and not the words,” but if I were a business owner I would ensure that employees saying “not a problem” to customers did not become a problem.

 

Writing of customer service editorials – since I have overcome the inertia – another pet peeve of mine is when members of wait staff feel the need to interject small editorials while the customer is ordering.

 

“I’ll have a chunk of fried, dead field beast, with mashed-up, boiled tuber-and-greasy-flour, and a glass of high fructose corn syrup with food coloring,” the customer says.

 

“Excellent!” the waiter says, either to let the customer know that the order meets with his discriminating approval, or perhaps because he hasn’t been trained properly.

 

The pièce de résistance of such editorial tidbits is, of course, when the waiter responds to the customer’s order by saying, “Awesome!”

 

As overly sated with pointless stimuli as “generation [insert label du jour here]” is, and as generally blasé as our whole society has become, it’s odd that a simple order of food can inspire awe in someone.

 

Yes, that 'not a problem' saying is a good one for this thread.    I also laugh when someone says 'to be honest with you' especially when talking to a judge on one of those court TV shows.   It is great when the judge says back 'so what you said before this wasn't truthful?'  and the person gives that deer in the headlights look!

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...   I also laugh when someone says 'to be honest with you' especially when talking to a judge on one of those court TV shows.   It is great when the judge says back 'so what you said before this wasn't truthful?'  and the person gives that deer in the headlights look!

 

A couple of days ago, a friend of mine who is a JP mentioned that this very phrase makes a regular appearance in his court. I’ll have to tell him about the “So, what you said before wasn’t truthful?” comeback.

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Yes, that 'not a problem' saying is a good one for this thread.    I also laugh when someone says 'to be honest with you' especially when talking to a judge on one of those court TV shows.   It is great when the judge says back 'so what you said before this wasn't truthful?'  and the person gives that deer in the headlights look!

 

Oh now James...PLEASE don't tell me that you're a regular viewer of that woman "Judge Judy"'s program here!

 

(...'cause I COULD start to lose a little of all this respect you've built-up in my mind after all these years around here, ya know!!!) LOL ;)

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Oh now James...PLEASE don't tell me that you're a regular viewer of that woman "Judge Judy"'s program here!

 

(...'cause I COULD start to lose a little of all this respect you've built-up in my mind after all these years around here, ya know!!!) LOL ;)

 

I'm a fan of Judge Marian on The People's Court.   She is nice on the eyes and she explains her rulings from a legal POV.    Judy is too much over the top and too into herself.

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"Drive Slow" signs pose an adjectival problem as well.

HMMmm...I've always chuckled a bit at the signs I've seen on the side of the road that say, "Slow Children".  I KNOW it means to state that as drivers, we should drive SLOW, because there are CHILDREN in the area that might run out into traffic.  But, that's NOT how it READS!  :lol:

 

 

Sepiatone

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HMMmm...I've always chuckled a bit at the signs I've seen on the side of the road that say, "Slow Children".  I KNOW it means to state that as drivers, we should drive SLOW, because there are CHILDREN in the area that might run out into traffic.  But, that's NOT how it READS!  :lol:

 

 

Sepiatone

 

That's an even better example!

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Here's a selfie I took just for that crazy sign:

 

slow.jpg

 

Wow my hair was long! This was at a remote path near my camp in the Adirondacks.

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Here's a selfie I took just for that crazy sign:

 

Wow my hair was long! This was at a remote path near my camp in the Adirondacks.

 

Ha! That’s hilarious!

 

And, of course, without the children around to demonstrate their challenges, the sign poses a bit of a mystery as well. One can imagine rotund children desperately trying to waddle their way out of oncoming traffic, or perhaps children from the remedial class, stuck at the crossroads of their best intellectual efforts, trying to decide whether to get out of the way, or finish picking their noses.

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Well, HELL, Tiki-----

 

MY hair was that long, AND longer at one point.  Just paste on a beard, change the glasses to wire rims and we could've been TWINS!  Well, except for them OTHER differences, I suppose!  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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HMMmm...I've always chuckled a bit at the signs I've seen on the side of the road that say, "Slow Children".  I KNOW it means to state that as drivers, we should drive SLOW, because there are CHILDREN in the area that might run out into traffic.  But, that's NOT how it READS!  :lol:

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Well Sepia, seein' as how you DO realize this, I suppose that at least gives you a leg-up on "Donna The Deer Lady" here, doesn't it!...;)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CI8UPHMzZm8

 

(...I still find this hilarious)

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... that at least gives you a leg-up on "Donna The Deer Lady" here, doesn't it!... ;)

 

 

If dear Donna has successfully procreated within the last few years, I can imagine the need for several “Slow Children” signs in her neighborhood. No doubt Donna would benefit from them as well.

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If dear Donna has successfully procreated within the last few years, I can imagine the need for several “Slow Children” signs in her neighborhood. No doubt Donna would benefit from them as well.

 

LOL

 

Yep Notan, That IS a very good point, indeed!

 

However, I suppose Donna COULD always just raise her youngins to live their lives a little more like THIS "Hippie" HERE lives HIS life and just disregard what all those signs say, RIGHT?!... ;)

 

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...

 

However, I suppose Donna COULD always just raise her youngins to live their lives a little more like THIS "Hippie" HERE lives HIS life and just disregard what all those signs say, RIGHT?!... ;)

 

 

Man! Such a great song! That sure takes me back!

 

Yes, I suppose she could. Selective Pressure doesn’t usually need much of a hand, but on busy days “ducks in a barrel” might be a welcomed respite.

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Well Sepia, seein' as how you DO realize this, I suppose that at least gives you a leg-up on "Donna The Deer Lady" here, doesn't it!... ;)

 

 

(...I still find this hilarious)

Deer are also taught to look both ways before they cross.

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Well Sepia, seein' as how you DO realize this, I suppose that at least gives you a leg-up on "Donna The Deer Lady" here, doesn't it!... ;)

 

 

(...I still find this hilarious)

Yeah, that WAS funny the first time I heard it, and it STILL gets me to chuckle.  I remember, before ever hearing it, on a trip up to Gladwin, MI  to visit family up there, we drove past a "Deer Crossing" sign, and I joked with my wife about, ----"How do the DEER know to come to where the SIGN is to cross the road?"   Of course, she looked at me as if I were crazy.  But, I've gotten USED to THAT!

 

 

Sepiatone

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