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Crack-Up (1946)


cigarjoe
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Anybody catch the Noir Crack-Up this morning? Anybody ever read "Madman's Holiday" by Fredric Brown the book it was suggested by? Curious to know the story line and the historical time frame. Anyway the reason I ask is because in the film's finale seems to take place on Park Ave along the tracks to Grand Central. Its funny  because you hear the sounds of steam locomotives passing by, but once the new Grand Central Terminal was built the tracks went underground below 97th street and the lines were electrified to Croton, so there shouldn't be steam locomotives running about. The electrics were almost silent comparatively unless they sounded their horns.

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Anybody catch the Noir Crack-Up this morning? Anybody ever read "Madman's Holiday" by Fredric Brown the book it was suggested by? Curious to know the story line and the historical time frame. Anyway the reason I ask is because in the film's finale seems to take place on Park Ave along the tracks to Grand Central. Its funny  because you hear the sounds of steam locomotives passing by, but once the new Grand Central Terminal was built the tracks went underground below 97th street and the lines were electrified to Croton, so there shouldn't be steam locomotives running about. The electrics were almost silent comparatively unless they sounded their horns.

OK, is this a thread about Film Noir or about use of trains in movies?  Personally I think it belongs in General Discussions, but someone might disagree.

Regardless, I am a train fan and it is always interesting to see how Hollywood used or misused them.  For instance, in Narrow Margin (original), they took the railroad name off some of the trains.  They also used names of actual passenger trains, but also made up names for others.  Of course, they also played loose with bedrooms, compartments, drawing rooms, lounges, bar cars, rest rooms, etc. as to what they looked like and the sizes.

Oh, they also used a very short (4 car?) train for one of exterior views when it was supposed to be a very long premium train.

Edited by TheCid
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There is a similar train faux pas in Kiss Of Death when Tony (Victor Mature) takes his family to the train station (Philipse Manor) along the Hudson River. You see a steam locomotive approaching the station but you can see the third rail for the electric locomotives also. The shot then cuts to the passenger coaches, all passenger trains were electrified to Croton on the Hudson, so the steam locomotive was actually pulling a freight, hence the cut.

 

The steamer was more dramatic.  ;)

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The best foley faux pas I've seen was our last week's screening of LOVE THY NEIGHBOR (1940)

 

There was a scene of speed boats chasing each other on open water and the sound effects were tires skidding & squealing on pavement! Don't know if it was added for comic effect, but our table was rolling in laughter!

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