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Who has the best voice...?

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What do folks think about Marilyn Monroe's voice?

 

Is it her natural speaking voice in something like THE RIVER OF NO RETURN, or just part of the persona she crafted for herself in the 1950s at Fox? I haven't seen any of her earlier films from the 40s to compare it.

 

 

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What do folks think about Marilyn Monroe's voice?

 

Is it her natural speaking voice in something like THE RIVER OF NO RETURN, or just part of the persona she crafted for herself in the 1950s at Fox? I haven't seen any of her earlier films from the 40s to compare it.

She affected the breathless voice, just as Jackie Kennedy did.

 

I liken it to chalk on a blackboard.

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She affected the breathless voice, just as Jackie Kennedy did.

 

I liken it to chalk on a blackboard.

I figured she probably did. And Jayne Mansfield definitely did-- very put on.

 

Then we have someone like Georgia Engel who naturally (and innocently) sounds that way without even trying!

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Dargo, on 30 Nov 2014 - 2:36 PM, said:

 

Sorry, don't agree at all with this.

 

And you're allowed not to. See, Dargo, done with no passive aggressive snark. Oh darn, that was passive aggressive snark, wasn't it?

 

REALLY, primos?! You think THAT was "passive aggressive SNARK" I just posted in reply to your opinion there????

 

OR, what you just replied back to me with was in that form of a reply???

 

Sorry my dear, but in NEITHER case could yours OR mine be considered as such...well until you added the "passive aggressive" comment, that is.

 

And so, what say we keep any past-tense animosity which might have somehow developed between us away from this discussion.

 

(...I'm sure Warren William would approve of such a tact) ;)

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What do folks think about Marilyn Monroe's voice?

 

Is it her natural speaking voice in something like THE RIVER OF NO RETURN, or just part of the persona she crafted for herself in the 1950s at Fox? I haven't seen any of her earlier films from the 40s to compare it.

I agree that Marilyn affected her breathy voice.  She used it in All About Eve before she was Marilyn Monroe, she used it in her films that put her on the map.  I can't remember what she sounded like in The River of No Return.  I believe she uses her real voice in her later films (Bus Stop and The Misfits), when she was trying to break away from her dumb blonde stereotype roles.  In Some Like it Hot, she's kind of got the breathy voice going, but she also uses her real voice. 

 

I've seen a couple of her early early films, Let's Make it Legal and Monkey Business, but I can't remember what she sounded like in either film to make a definitive statement. 

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There's a very good description of this event in Lee Tannen's book I Loved Lucy. He says that she scaled back her appearances because she couldn't have plastic surgery (something about her skin bruising too badly). So when she did this appearance at the Oscars, she spent hours using a special kind of tape to pull up her sagging face and pin it up under her wig. It sounded like a very painful process. But people were not talking about her face the next day-- they were talking about the amount of leg she exposed in the dress she was wearing!

 

I think I read something about Lucy being uncomfortable because of the pins and wig.  I don't blame her, that sounds awful.  Her big sequin dress that she was wearing looks like it'd be very heavy.  It's a shame that an elderly woman feels that she isn't worthy of being out in public because she can't get plastic surgery to look younger.  It definitely says a lot about Hollywood and society in general. 

 

Regarding her showing a lot of leg.  She was a former model and did have very good legs.  The woman was 77 years old at the time, you go Lucy!

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Robert Ryan & Gregory Peck

 

LOL

 

(...and I suppose you folks know why I'm laughin' here, doncha?!) ;)

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She affected the breathless voice, just as Jackie Kennedy did.

 

I liken it to chalk on a blackboard.

I can see Marilyn's motive for the put-on voice, but I can't see Jackie's motive.

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Robert Ryan & Gregory Peck

 

LOL

 

(...and I suppose you folks know why I'm laughin' here, doncha?!) ;)

And let's not forget Melvyn Douglas. And Jane Fonda has a particularly rich, beautiful voice!  :)

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Just thought of one - not a face, but oh that voice:

 

Herbert Morrison.

 

Who?

 

Herb Morrison - Hindenburg Disaster, 1937

One of the most famous broadcasts in the history of radio journalism is Herb Morrison’s 1937 eyewitness report of the explosion and crash of the German passenger airship, Hindenburg. On May 6, 1937, while preparing to land at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey, the Hindenburg burst into flames and crashed to the ground, killing thirty-five of the ninety-seven people on board and one member of the ground crew.

Chicago radio station WLS had sent reporter Herb Morrison and sound engineer Charles Nehlsen to record the landing which was being celebrated as the first anniversary of the inauguration of transatlantic passenger service and the opening of the 1937 season. Morrison’s professional demeanor as he described the landing gave way to an emotional outburst of exclamations after the Hindenburg caught fire. Shaken and horrified, Morrison continued to record, struggling to compose himself as a hellish scene of fiery death unfolded before his eyes.

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And let's not forget Melvyn Douglas. And Jane Fonda has a particularly rich, beautiful voice!  :)

 

Yeah, good additions to the list here, Swithin. ;)

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Just thought of one - not a face, but oh that voice:

 

Herbert Morrison.

 

Who?

 

Herb Morrison - Hindenburg Disaster, 1937

One of the most famous broadcasts in the history of radio journalism is Herb Morrison’s 1937 eyewitness report of the explosion and crash of the German passenger airship, Hindenburg. On May 6, 1937, while preparing to land at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey, the Hindenburg burst into flames and crashed to the ground, killing thirty-five of the ninety-seven people on board and one member of the ground crew.

Chicago radio station WLS had sent reporter Herb Morrison and sound engineer Charles Nehlsen to record the landing which was being celebrated as the first anniversary of the inauguration of transatlantic passenger service and the opening of the 1937 season. Morrison’s professional demeanor as he described the landing gave way to an emotional outburst of exclamations after the Hindenburg caught fire. Shaken and horrified, Morrison continued to record, struggling to compose himself as a hellish scene of fiery death unfolded before his eyes.

 

Well, THEN there was always Walter Cronkite, of course.

 

(..."And that's the way it is!")

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I think Ray Milland had a distinctive voice and it could be either evil, represent the NE intellectuals or English. Actually I don't recall whether he was English or not now that I think about it.

 

Dean Martin had a speaking voice that would more or less melt into song and is easily distinct from others. I agree with the individual who noted that most of today's actors are indistinguishable and I hazard it is because they either never had public speaking, debated or any elocution classes.

 

Another voice that is distinct is Eugene Pallatt and Groucho Marx...like we wouldn't recognize that voice ???

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I think Ray Milland had a distinctive voice and it could be either evil, represent the NE intellectuals or English. Actually I don't recall whether he was English or not now that I think about it.

 

Dean Martin had a speaking voice that would more or less melt into song and is easily distinct from others. I agree with the individual who noted that most of today's actors are indistinguishable and I hazard it is because they either never had public speaking, debated or any elocution classes.

 

Another voice that is distinct is Eugene Pallatt and Groucho Marx...like we wouldn't recognize that voice ???

It sounds as if you are lumping the two together. The only thing they had in common was two arms and two legs.

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I couldn't find where anyone had mentioned this person, so I'll also throw in Phil Harris: Baloo the bear in The Jungle Book (1967), O'Malley the cat in The AristoCats (1970), et. al.

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James Earl Jones

Jimmy Stewart

Paul Harvey but he wasn't in movies. ;)

Patricia Neal

Maureen O'Hara

Mel Blanc

Sam Elliot

Peter O'Toole

Julie Andrews

Lauren Bacall

Morgan Freeman

Katharine Hepburn

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In the original post I made in this thread, I listed George Macready as my favorite voice in classic movies. I am watching a 1958 episode of the western TV series Wanted: Dead or Alive starring Steve McQueen. I heard a very familiar voice but the man was older so I did not immediately recognize him. But I knew it had to be George Macready. It was.

 

I looked him up on the IMDb and in the biographical section, it says one of his trademarks was his 'gravelly smoke burnished voice.' I think that's a perfect description!

 

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